×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Uganda and the Egyptian Soudan
     

Uganda and the Egyptian Soudan

by Charles Thomas Wilson
 

See All Formats & Editions

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 Excerpt: ...the young king being meanwhile trained up in the traditions of his ancestors. Should, however, the three chiefs not agree in the choice of a successor, they

Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 Excerpt: ...the young king being meanwhile trained up in the traditions of his ancestors. Should, however, the three chiefs not agree in the choice of a successor, they go to war about it, and the victor places his nominee on the throne. The reason of this singular law is, no doubt, to prevent intrigues during the king's lifetime. The brothers of the king elect are kept in confinement during his minority, and when he comes of age all are burnt, with the exception of two or three who are preserved to keep up the succession, in case the young sovereign should die childless. The children of the king have no rank or status on account of their birth, and the princesses are not as a rule allowed to marry, only a few of Mtesa's numerous daughters having been given as wives to neighbouring kings or to the great nobles of Uganda. The administration of justice has already been described. The punishments which are inflicted are imprisonment in the stocks, mutilation, and death. The stocks consist of a heavy block of wood with a hole in it through which the foot is placed, and a peg is driven in which prevents it being withdrawn. This is a punishment confined to small offences, such as petty thefts and insubordination on the part of wives or slaves. Theft is punished frequently by cutting off the hands, ears, or nose. Adultery is punished invariably by death, and murder occasionally, but more often only by a fine. The Waganda have a variety of modes of execution, some of them being horribly barbarous. Beheading and strangling are those commonly employed, and human sacrifices are always beheaded. For the worst offences the victim is bled slowly to death by gashing the body with sharp splinters of a reed, care being taken to avoid the larger arteries and veins. A small army of execu...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940022264678
Publisher:
London, S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews