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Umpires: Classic Baseball Stories from the Men Who Made the Calls
     

Umpires: Classic Baseball Stories from the Men Who Made the Calls

by John C. Skipper
 

They are known by a variety of names, many of them unprintable. Like the big league players, they are the very best in their profession and spend years honing their craft, yet some fans pretend to believe they are incompetent boobs. They are the men in blue on the baseball diamond, major league umpires.
In this work, nineteen umps provide their unique insight

Overview

They are known by a variety of names, many of them unprintable. Like the big league players, they are the very best in their profession and spend years honing their craft, yet some fans pretend to believe they are incompetent boobs. They are the men in blue on the baseball diamond, major league umpires.
In this work, nineteen umps provide their unique insight on some of the most important and pivotal moments in baseball history. Don Denkinger recounts his call that turned the 1985 World Series. “Red” Flaherty and Bill Kinnamon recall the excitement of Roger Maris’ 61st homer. From these men and Bill Jackowski, Bill Haller, John Rice, Dutch Rennert, John Kibler, Bill Valentine, Terry Cooney, Andy Olsen, Marty Springstead, Doug Harvey, Ken Burkhart, Ed Runge, Hank Morgenweck, Art Frantz, Jerry Neudecker, and Steamboat Johnson, we get a different view of the game and a new appreciation for the job the umpires do on a daily basis.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
includes Red Flaherty and Bill Kinnamon's memories of Roger Maris's 61st home run, Ed Runge's account of Don Larson's perfect game and more. Most large collections should have this
Yankees Magazine
loaded with humor and interesting anecdotes
Brooklyn Spectator
"the stories will delight any dyed in the wool baseball fan! It's a good one!"
From the Publisher
“includes Red Flaherty and Bill Kinnamon’s memories of Roger Maris’s 61st home run, Ed Runge’s account of Don Larson’s perfect game and more. Most large collections should have this”—Library Journal; “loaded with humor and interesting anecdotes”—Yankees Magazine; “the stories will delight any dyed in the wool baseball fan! It’s a good one!”—Brooklyn Spectator.
VOYA - Raymond Houser
Umpires are a necessary part of the game of baseball, but though necessary, they remain largely anonymous, especially if they do their jobs well. Here, Skipper relates the memorable moments of nineteen umpires. John "Red" Flaherty tells of the day Roger Maris hit his sixty-first home run, to break Babe Ruth's single-season record. Don Denkinger makes the call, although a bad one, that allows the Kansas City Royals to rally and defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1985 World Series. Doug Harvey is behind the plate when Kirk Gibson homes in the bottom of the ninth in 1988 to defeat the Oakland Athletics and lead the Los Angeles Dodgers to a World Series win. These great moments are paid for by years of toil in the minor leagues, following umpire's school. Once in the minors, umpires learn their craft, and then, if lucky, they get the call to the big leagues. Almost all of the umpires in this book admit to a lucky break or to being noticed by an important person who made it possible for them to get to the major leagues. As with minor league ballplayers, many umpires aspire to be major leaguers, but few ever make it. A big-league umpire can make as much as $225,000 a year, but their life is very difficult. Unlike the ballplayers who play at home half the season, umpires are on the road the whole season. Umpires will appeal to YA readers who have an interest in baseball. It is written in four- to five-page segments, a plus for those with short attention spans. The book might inspire sympathy for umpires and their difficult role, and also might provide the blueprint for a YA looking for a career in professional sports other than as a player. Index. Photos. Charts. Biblio. Chronology. Appendix. VOYA Codes: 3Q 2P M J S (Readable without serious defects, For the YA with a special interest in the subject, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8, Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9 and Senior High-defined as grades 10 to 12).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786403646
Publisher:
McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
Publication date:
06/01/1997
Pages:
190
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.38(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

John C. Skipper, a political reporter for the Mason City (Iowa) Globe Gazette, has written numerous books on politics and baseball, including a history of the The Iowa Caucuses and acclaimed biographies of Grover Cleveland Alexander, Dazzy Vance and Charlie Gehringer.

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