Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

by Harriet Beecher Stowe
3.7 269

NOOK Book(eBook)

$2.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom's Cabin was a sensation upon its publication in 1852. In its first year it sold 300,000 copies, and has since been translated into more than twenty languages. This powerful story of one slave's unbreakable spirit holds an important place in American history, as it helped solidify the anti-slavery sentiments of the North, and moved a nation to civil war.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780679641988
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/01/2000
Series: Modern Library Series
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 656
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Harriet Beecher Stowe, a prolific writer best remembered today for Uncle Tom's Cabin, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on June 14, 1811, into a prominent New England family. Her father, Lyman Beecher, was a well-known Congregational minister, and her brother Henry Ward Beecher became a distinguished preacher, orator, and lecturer. Like all the Beechers she grew up with a strong sense of wanting to improve humanity. At the age of thirteen Harriet Beecher enrolled in the Hartford Female Seminary and subsequently taught there until 1832, when the family moved to Cincinnati. In Ohio she was an instructor at a school founded by her elder sister Catharine, and she soon began publishing short stories in the Western Monthly Magazine.

Four years later, in 1836, Harriet Beecher married Calvin Stowe, a respected biblical scholar and theologian by whom she had seven children. In order to supplement the family's meager income she continued writing. The Mayflower, her first collection of stories and sketches, appeared in 1843. During this period abolitionist conflicts rocked Cincinnati, and Mrs. Stowe witnessed firsthand the misery of slaves living just across the Ohio River in Kentucky. But not until the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was she inspired to write about their plight. After the family resettled in Brunswick, Maine, when Mr. Stowe was hired as a professor at Bowdoin College, she began working on a novel that would expose the evils of slavery.

First serialized in the National Era, an abolitionist paper, in forty weekly installments between June 5, 1851, and April 1, 1852, and published as a book on March 20, 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin was an enormous success. Tolstoy deemed it a great work of literature 'flowing from love of God and man,' and within a year the book had sold more than 300,000 copies. When Uncle Tom's Cabin appeared in Great Britain Queen Victoria sent Mrs. Stowe a note of gratitude, and enthusiastic crowds greeted the author in London on her first trip abroad in 1853. In an attempt to silence the many critics at home who denounced the work as vicious propaganda, Mrs. Stowe brought out A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin in 1853, which contained documentary evidence substantiating the graphic picture of slavery she had drawn. Dred (1856), a second antislavery novel, did not enjoy the acclaim of Uncle Tom's Cabin, yet the author had already stirred the conscience of the nation and the world, fueling sentiments that would ignite the Civil War. When Abraham Lincoln met her at the White House in 1862 he allegedly remarked: 'So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war!'

In subsequent novels Stowe shifted her attention away from the issue of slavery. Beginning with The Minister's Wooing (1859), and continuing with The Pearl of Orr's Island (1862), Oldtown Folks (1869), and Poganuc People (1878), she presented a perceptive and realistic chronicle of colonial New England, focusing especially on the theological warfare that underscored Puritan life. In a second and less popular series of novels—My Wife and I (1871), Pink and White Tyranny (1871), and We and Our Neighbors (1875)—she depicted the mores of post-Civil War America. Mrs. Stowe did enjoy success, however, with the controversial Lady Byron Vindicated (1870), a bold defense of her friend Anne, Lady Byron, that scandalously revealed Lord Byron's moral delinquency. In addition she became a regular contributor to the Atlantic Monthly, which published many of the memorable short stories later collected in Oldtown Fireside Stories (1872) and Sam Lawson's Oldtown Fireside Stories (1881).

Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote little during the last years of her life. She died in Hartford, Connecticut, on July 1, 1896. Perhaps Mrs. Stowe's achievement was best summed up by abolitionist Frederick Douglass who said: 'Hers was the word for the hour.'

Date of Birth:

June 14, 1811

Date of Death:

July 1, 1896

Place of Birth:

Litchfield, Connecticut

Place of Death:

Hartford, Connecticut

Education:

Homeschooled

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Uncle Tom's Cabin 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 269 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is only the first 4 chapters!!!!!!!! DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Book starts at chapter twenty nine. Save time and nook memory. Do not bother with this edition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a classic. It is a touching story about what slaves went through. It was even good enough to be put in the movie The King and I. That is what first moved me to read this book. Seriously give this book a try. You wont be disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a fantastic book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After so many years i finally read this classic and i must say its an emotional rollercoaster.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While the events described in this book may seem highly unethical, the author had little recourse except to depict them in a straightforward manner. Slavery was not and is not ever a pretty picture. Readers turned off by the content are forced to acknowledge the degrading conditions of the oppressed in the antebellum U. S. South. That Uncle Tom could maintain such a positive sense of self-dignity and deep spirituality through the atrocities visited upon him, represents the indomitable spirit displayed by many African Americans during the era portrayed in this novel.
Kasey Andrews More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for a project in my American literature class last year and I really enjoyed it. Mrs. Stowe did an excellent job with characterization and descriptions. After researching her use of literary techniques, I could really appreciate her style of writing. It was a very well developed story with very interesting characters, all off them had their own story. I love how you could see the author's faith shine through in the book. It really gives you a different perspective on the religion of the day. I recommend this to readers who are up to a challenge as it is a rather hard book to just sit and read.
pcj60 More than 1 year ago
As an african american i think this is a must read. I never knew how compelling this book would be. Even with the errors it was still worthy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This classic is a must read for those who have missed this tale of the pain of human suffering in slavery...a pain that must not be forgotton, ever. I enjoyed this book as a 'reading again' experience, as classics such as this always have new meanings and enlightment with each reading. I highly recommend this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome! We are studying this in social studies!
ANDILOU More than 1 year ago
Something that everyone should read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Made me think of slavery in a whole new way. Highly recommended reading material.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Empty
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Please do not waste your time and energy on this piece of junk. Thank you! - a reader
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Upon reading this work it was easy to see how it came to influence the end of slavery. The call to action for Christians was well written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fhnjvgytytirqe
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"We don't have to do this right now. If your scared. Just tell me." He said, the britishyness in his voice really showing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I kinda wanna read it , heard its a good book, but I'm thirteen and have also heard that its really confusing and hard to read. Please reply- should I read it?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cant read a thing and there is only ten friggin pages...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like the way the book was written. Good because Stowe actually lived during the time of the story and wrote her book based upon personal interviews with slaves.