Uncle Tom's Cabin, Young Folks' Edition

Uncle Tom's Cabin, Young Folks' Edition

by Harriet Beecher Stowe

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Overview

Uncle Tom's Cabin, Young Folks' Edition by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom's Cabin, Young Folks' Edition
Harriet Beecher Stowe

This edition includes 26 illustrations. "Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly", is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel "helped lay the groundwork for the Civil War", according to Will Kaufman. Stowe, a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Seminary and an active abolitionist, featured the character of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave around whom the stories of other characters revolve. The sentimental novel depicts the reality of slavery while also asserting that Christian love can overcome something as destructive as enslavement of fellow human beings. "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was the best-selling novel of the 19th century and the second best-selling book of that century, following the Bible. It is credited with helping fuel the abolitionist cause in the 1850s. In the first year after it was published, 300,000 copies of the book were sold in the United States; one million copies were sold in Great Britain. In 1855, three years after it was published, it was called "the most popular novel of our day." The impact attributed to the book is great, reinforced by a story that when Abraham Lincoln met Stowe at the start of the Civil War, Lincoln declared, "So this is the little lady who started this great war." The quote is apocryphal; it did not appear in print until 1896, and it has been argued that "The long-term durability of Lincoln's greeting as an anecdote in literary studies and Stowe scholarship can perhaps be explained in part by the desire among many contemporary intellectuals ... to affirm the role of literature as an agent of social change." The book and the plays it inspired helped popularize a number of stereotypes about black people. These include the affectionate, dark-skinned "mammy"; the "pickaninny" stereotype of black children; and the "Uncle Tom", or dutiful, long-suffering servant faithful to his white master or mistress. In recent years, the negative associations with "Uncle Tom's Cabin" have, to an extent, overshadowed the historical impact of the book as a "vital antislavery tool."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781727697346
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 10/07/2018
Pages: 74
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.15(d)

About the Author

Date of Birth:

June 14, 1811

Date of Death:

July 1, 1896

Place of Birth:

Litchfield, Connecticut

Place of Death:

Hartford, Connecticut

Education:

Homeschooled

Read an Excerpt

Late in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone
over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P—, in Kentucky.
There were no servants present, and the gentlemen, with chairs closely
approaching, seemed to be discussing some subject with great earnestness.

For convenience sake, we have said, hitherto, two gentlemen. One of the parties,
however, when critically examined, did not seem, strictly speaking, to come under
the species. He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and
that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his
way upward in the world. He was much over-dressed, in a gaudy vest of many
colors, a blue neckerchief, bedropped gayly with yellow spots, and arranged with a
flaunting tie, quite in keeping with the general air of the man. His hands, large and
coarse, were plentifully bedecked with rings; and he wore a heavy gold
watch-chain, with a bundle of seals of portentous size, and a great variety of colors,
attached to it,—which, in the ardor of conversation, he was in the habit of
flourishing and jingling with evident satisfaction. His conversation was in free and
easy defiance of Murray's Grammar, and was garnished at convenient intervals with
various profane expressions, which not eventhe desire to be graphic in our account
shall induce us to transcribe.

His companion, Mr. Shelby, had the appearance of a gentleman; and the
arrangements of the house, and the general air of the housekeeping, indicated easy,
and even opulent circumstances. As we before stated, the two were in the midst of
an earnest conversation.

'That is the way I should arrange the matter,' said Mr. Shelby.

'I can't make trade that way—I positively can't, Mr. Shelby,' said the other, holding
up a glass of wine between his eye and the light.

'Why, the fact is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow; he is certainly worth that sum
anywhere—steady, honest, capable, manages my whole farm like a clock.'

'You mean honest, as niggers go,' said Haley, helping himself to a glass of brandy.

'No; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible, pious fellow. He got religion at
a camp-meeting, four years ago; and I believe he really did get it. I've trusted him,
since then, with everything I have,—money, house, horses,—and let him come and
go round the country; and I always found him true and square in everything.'

'Some folks don't believe there is pious niggers, Shelby,' said Haley, with a candid
flourish of his hand, 'but I do. I had a fellow, now, in this yer last lot I took to
Orleans—'twas as good as a meetin', now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was
quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap
of a man that was 'bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider
religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake.'

'Well, Tom's got the real article, if ever a fellow had,' rejoined the other. 'Why, last
fall, I let him go to Cincinnati alone, to do business for me, and bring home five
hundred dollars. 'Tom,' says I to him, 'I trust you, because I think you're a
Christian—'I know you wouldn't cheat.' Tom comes back, sure enough; I knew he
would. Some low fellows, they say, said to him—'Tom, why don't you make tracks
for Canada?' 'Ah, master trusted me, and I couldn't'—they told me about it. I am sorry
to part with Tom, I must say. You ought to let him cover the whole balance of the
debt; and you would, Haley, if you had any conscience.'

'Well, I've got just as much conscience as any man in business can afford to
keep,—just a little, you know, to swear by, as 'twere,' said the trader, jocularly; 'and
then, I'm ready to do anything in reason to 'blige friends; but this yer, you see, is a
leetle too hard on a fellow—a leetle too hard.' The trader sighed contemplatively, and

Table of Contents

Vol. I
IIn Which the Reader Is Introduced to a Man of Humanity7
IIThe Mother17
IIIThe Husband and Father20
IVAn Evening in Uncle Tom's Cabin25
VShowing the Feelings of Living Property on Changing Owners37
VIDiscovery45
VIIThe Mother's Struggle54
VIIIEliza's Escape67
IXIn Which It Appears That a Senator Is But a Man82
XThe Property Is Carried Off99
XIIn Which Property Gets into an Improper State of Mind108
XIISelect Incident of Lawful Trade122
XIIIThe Quaker Settlement139
XIVEvangeline148
XVOf Tom's New Master, and Various Other Matters158
XVITom's Mistress and Her Opinions174
XVIIThe Freeman's Defence193
XVIIIMiss Ophelia's Experiences and Opinions209
Vol. II
XIXMiss Ophelia's Experiences and Opinions, Continued226
XXTopsy245
XXIKentuck260
XXII"The Grass Withereth--the Flower Fadeth"265
XXIIIHenrique272
XXIVForeshadowings280
XXVThe Little Evangelist286
XXVIDeath291
XXVII"This Is the Last of Earth"304
XXVIIIReunion312
XXIXThe Unprotected326
XXXThe Slave Warehouse334
XXXIThe Middle Passage344
XXXIIDark Places350
XXXIIICassy359
XXXIVThe Quadroon's Story366
XXXVThe Tokens377
XXXVIEmmeline and Cassy383
XXXVIILiberty390
XXXVIIIThe Victory396
XXXIXThe Stratagem406
XLThe Martyr416
XLIThe Young Master423
XLIIAn Authentic Ghost Story429
XLIIIResults436
XLIVThe Liberator444
XLVConcluding Remarks447

Reading Group Guide

Uncle Tom, Topsy, Sambo, Simon Legree, little Eva: their names are American bywords, and all of them are characters in Harriet Beecher Stowe's remarkable novel of the pre-Civil War South. Uncle Tom's Cabin was revolutionary in 1852 for its passionate indictment of slavery and for its presentation of Tom, "a man of humanity," as the first black hero in American fiction. Labeled racist and condescending by some contemporary critics, it remains a shocking, controversial, and powerful work -- exposing the attitudes of white nineteenth-century society toward "the peculiar institution" and documenting, in heartrending detail, the tragic breakup of black Kentucky families "sold down the river." An immediate international sensation, Uncle Tom's Cabin sold 300,000 copies in the first year, was translated into thirty-seven languages, and has never gone out of print: its political impact was immense, its emotional influence immeasurable.


From the Paperback edition.

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Uncle Tom's Cabin, Young Folks' Edition (Illustrated Edition) (Dodo Press) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A used dirt road runs in each dirrection out or deeper in the forest. It sits neatly in the middle of the clearing with a stables in the back and a small shed beside the stable. I small black and white sheperd sits patiently in front of the door, looking for anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gtg bbs