Understanding DB2: Learning Visually with Examples

Understanding DB2: Learning Visually with Examples

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780132797412
Publisher: Pearson Education
Publication date: 12/29/2007
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 1056
File size: 35 MB
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About the Author

Raul F. Chong, DB2 on Campus Program Manager at the IBM Toronto Laboratory, is a DB2 Certified Solutions Expert in administration and application development with ten years of experience in DB2. He has helped customers resolve DB2 migration, performance, and design issues; developed new DB2 solutions; taught DB2 workshops; contributed to DB2 exam tutorials; and was the lead author of the first edition of Understanding DB2.

Xiaomei Wang, a technical consultant at the IBM Toronto Laboratory, has nine years of DB2 experience. She has handled critical DB2 customer and business partner situations worldwide.

Michael Dang, DB2 Technical Sales Specialist, specializes in solution design, database sizing, product licensing, and Balanced Warehouse configurations. He formerly served as a DB2 Support Analyst and spent seven years as a DB2 DBA.

Dwaine R. Snow, DB2 Senior Product Manager, has worked with DB2 for seventeen years. He is the coauthor of Advanced DBA Certification Guide and Reference for DB2 Universal Database for Linux, UNIX, and Windows, DB2 UDB for Windows, and the first edition of Understanding DB2.

Table of Contents

Foreword xxiii Preface xxv Acknowledgments xxxi About the Authors xxxiii Chapter 1 Introduction to DB2 1

1.1 Brief History of DB2 1

1.2 The Role of DB2 in the Information On-Demand World 4

1.3 DB2 Editions 13

1.4 DB2 Clients 20

1.5 Try-and-Buy Versions 22

1.6 Host Connectivity 23

1.7 Federation Support 23

1.8 Replication Support 24

1.9 IBM WebSphere Federation Server and WebSphere Replication Server 25

1.10 Special Package Offerings for Developers 25

1.11 DB2 Syntax Diagram Conventions 26

1.12 Case Study 28

1.13 Summary 29

1.14 Review Questions 30

Chapter 2 DB2 at a Glance: The Big Picture 33

2.1 SQL Statements, XQuery Statements, and DB2 Commands 33

2.2 DB2 Tools Overview 38

2.4 Federation 55

2.5 Case Study: The DB2 Environment 56

2.6 Database Partitioning Feature 58

2.7 Case Study: DB2 with DPF Environment 74

2.8 IBM Balanced Warehouse 79

2.9 Summary 81

2.10 Review Questions 81

Chapter 3 Installing DB2 85

3.1 DB2 Installation: The Big Picture 85

3.2 Installing DB2 Using the DB2 Setup Wizard 88

3.3 Non-Root Installation on Linux and Unix 102

3.4 Required User IDs and Groups 105

3.5 Silent Install Using a Response File 108

3.6 Advanced DB2 Installation Methods (Linux and UNIX Only) 113

3.7 Installing a DB2 License 116

3.8 Installing DB2 in a DPF Environment 118

3.9 Installing Multiple db2 Versions and Fix Packs on the Same Server 119

3.10 Installing DB2 Fix Packs 126

3.11 Migrating DB2 129

3.12 Case Study 131

3.13 Summary 133

3.14 Review Questions 134

Chapter 4 Using the DB2 Tools 137

4.1 DB2 Tools: The Big Picture 137

4.2 The Command-Line Tools 138

4.3 Web-Based Tools 157

4.4 General Administration Tools 158

4.5 Information Tools 165

4.6 Monitoring Tools 167

4.7 Setup Tools 171

4.8 Other Tools 175

4.9 Tool Settings 179

4.10 Case Study 179

4.11 Summary 184

4.12 Review Questions 185

Chapter 5 Understanding the DB2 Environment, DB2 Instances, and Databases 189

5.1 The DB2 Environment, DB2 Instances, and Databases: The Big Picture 189

5.2 The DB2 Environment 190

5.3 The DB2 Instance 198

5.4 The Database Administration Server 216

5.5 Configuring a Database 217

5.6 Instance and Database Design Considerations 224

5.7 Case Study 225

5.8 Summary 227

5.9 Review Questions 227

Chapter 6 Configuring Client and Server Connectivity 231

6.1 Client and Server Connectivity: The Big Picture 231

6.2 The DB2 Database Directories 233

6.3 Supported Connectivity Scenarios 243

6.4 Configuring Database Connections Using the Configuration Assistant 258

6.5 Diagnosing DB2 Connectivity Problems 276

6.6 Case Study 283

6.7 Summary 285

6.8 Review Questions 286

Chapter 7 Working with Database Objects 289

7.1 DB2 Database Objects: The Big Picture 289

7.2 Databases 292

7.3 Partition Groups 298

7.4 Table Spaces 299

7.5 Buffer Pools 300

7.6 Schemas 301

7.7 Data Types 302

7.8 Tables

7.9 Indexes

7.10 Multidimensional Clustering Tables and Block Indexes 347

7.11 Combining DPF, Table Partitioning, and MDC 351

7.12 Views 352

7.13 Packages 357

7.14 Triggers 358

7.15 Stored Procedures 360

7.16 User-Defined Functions 362

7.17 Sequences 364

7.18 Case Study 366

7.19 Summary 369

7.20 Review Questions 370

Chapter 8 The DB2 Storage Model 375

8.1 The DB2 Storage Model: The Big Picture 375

8.2 Databases: Logical and Physical Storage of Your Data 377

8.3 Database Partition Groups 384

8.4 Table Spaces 388

8.5 Buffer Pools 406

8.6 Case Study 410

8.7 Summary 412

8.8 Review Questions 412

Chapter 9 Leveraging the Power of SQL 417

9.1 Querying DB2 Data 418

9.2 Modifying Table Data 433

9.3 Selecting from UPDATE, DELETE, or INSERT 434

9.4 The MERGE Statement 436

9.5 Recursive SQL 437

9.6 The UNION, INTERSECT, and EXCEPT Operators 439

9.7 Case Study 441

9.8 Summary 445

9.9 Review Questions 445

Chapter 10 Mastering the DB2 pureXML Support 453

10.1 XML: The Big Picture 454

10.2 pureXML in DB2 478

10.3 Querying XML Data 486

10.4 SQL/XML Publishing Functions 507

10.5 Transforming XML Documents Using XSLT Functions 509

10.6 Inserting XML Data into a DB2 Database 509

10.7 Updating and Deleting XML Data 511

10.8 XML Indexes 514

10.9 XML Schema Support and Validation in DB2 522

10.10 Annotated XML Schema Decomposition 529

10.11 XML Performance Considerations 532

10.12 pureXML Restrictions 533

10.13 Case Study 534

10.14 Summary 538

10.15 Review Questions 538

Chapter 11 Implementing Security 543

11.1 DB2 Security Model: The Big Picture 543

11.2 Authentication 545

11.3 Data Encryption 558

11.4 Administrative Authorities 558

11.5 Database Object Privileges 565

11.6 Label-Based Access Control (LBAC) 583

11.7 Authority and Privilege Metadata 590

11.8 Windows Domain Considerations 594

11.9 Trusted Contexts Security Enhancement 596

11.10 Case Study 598

11.11 Summary 599

11.12 Review Questions 600

Chapter 12 Understanding Concurrency and Locking 603

12.1 DB2 Locking and Concurrency: The Big Picture 603

12.2 Concurrency and Locking Scenarios 604

12.3 DB2 Isolation Levels 607

12.4 Changing Isolation Levels 612

12.5 DB2 Locking 619

12.6 Diagnosing Lock Problems 630

12.7 Techniques to Avoid Locking 643

12.8 Case Study 646

12.9 Summary 647

12.10 Review Questions 647

Chapter 13 Maintaining Data 651

13.1 DB2 Data Movement Utilities: The Big Picture 651

13.2 Data Movement File Formats 653

13.3 The DB2 EXPORT Utility 654

13.4 The DB2 IMPORT Utility 667

13.5 The DB2 Load Utility 676

13.6 The DB2MOVE Utility 697

13.7 The db2relocatedb Utility 700

13.8 Generating Data Definition Language 701

13.9 DB2 Maintenance Utilities 703

13.10 Case Study 715

13.11 Summary 717

13.12 Review Questions 717

Chapter 14 Developing Database Backup and Recovery Solutions 721

14.1 Database Recovery Concepts: The Big Picture 721

14.2 DB2 Transaction Logs 725

14.3 Recovery Terminology 737

14.4 Performing Database and Table Space Backups 738

14.5 Database and Table Space Recovery Using the RESTORE DATABASE Command 746

14.6 Database and Table Space Roll Forward 754

14.7 Recovering a Dropped Table 758

14.8 The Recovery History File 760

14.9 Database Recovery Using the RECOVER DATABASE Command 762

14.10 Rebuild Database Option 764

14.11 Backup Recovery through Online Split Mirroring and Suspended I/O Support 773

14.12 Maintaining High Availability with DB2 782

14.13 The Fault Monitor 799

14.14 Case Study 801

14.15 Summary 805

Chapter 15 The DB2 Process Model 811

15.1 The DB2 Process Model: The Big Picture 811

15.2 Threaded Engine Infrastructure 814

15.3 The DB2 Engine Dispatchable Units 816

15.4 Tuning the Number of EDUs 831

15.5 Monitoring and Tuning the DB2 Agents 833

15.6 The Connection Concentrator 834

15.7 Commonly Seen DB2 Executables 835

15.8 Additional Services/Processes on Windows 836

15.9 Case Study 837

15.10 Summary 838

15.11 Review Questions 839

Chapter 16 The DB2 Memory Model 843

16.1 DB2 Memory Allocation: The Big Picture 843

16.2 Instance-Level Shared Memory 845

16.3 Database-Level Shared Memory 846

16.4 Application-Level Shared Memory 850

16.5 Agent Private Memory 853

16.6 The Memory Model 855

16.7 Case Study 857

16.8 Summary 861

16.9 Review Questions 861

Chapter 17 Database Performance Considerations 865

17.1 Relation Data Performance Fundamentals 866

17.2 System/Server Configuration 866

17.3 The DB2 Configuration Advisor 869

17.4 Configuring the DB2 Instance 877

17.5 Configuring Your Databases 879

17.6 Lack of Proper Maintenance 884

17.7 Automatic Maintenance 888

17.8 The Snapshot Monitor 890

17.9 Event Monitors 893

17.10 The DB2 Optimizer 896

17.11 The Explain Tool and Explain Tables 897

17.12 Using Visual Explain to Examine Access Plans 898

17.13 Workload Management 899

17.14 Case Study 902

17.15 Summary 905

17.16 Review Questions 905

Chapter 18 Diagnosing Problems 909

18.1 Problem Diagnosis: The Big Picture 909

18.2 How DB2 Reports Issues 909

18.3 DB2 Error Message Description 911

18.4 DB2 First Failure Data Capture 913

18.5 Receiving E-mail Notifications 919

18.6 Tools for Troubleshooting 921

18.7 Searching for Known Problems 930

18.8 Case Study 931

18.9 Summary 934

18.10 Review Questions 935

Appendix A Solutions to the Review Questions 937 Appendix B Use of Uppercase versus Lowercase in DB2 961 Appendix C IBM Servers 965 Appendix D Using the DB2 System Catalog Tables 967Resources 981 Index 987

Introduction

In the world of information technology today, it is more and more difficult to keep up with the skills required to be successful on the job. This book was developed to minimize the time, money, and effort required to learn DB2 Universal Database (DB2 UDB) for Linux, UNIX, and Windows. The book visually introduces and discusses the latest version of DB2 UDB, Version 8.2. The goal with the development of DB2 was to make it work the same regardless of the operating system on which you choose to run it. The few differences in the implementation of DB2 UDB on these platforms are explained in this book.

Who Should Read This Book?

This book is intended for anyone who works with databases, such as database administrators (DBAs), application developers, system administrators, and consultants. This book is a great introduction to DB2, whether you have used DB2 before or you are new to DB2. It is also a good study guide for anyone preparing for the IBM DB2 Universal Database Version 8 Certification exams 700 (DB2 UDB Family Fundamentals) and 701 (DB2 UDB Database Administration), or the DB2 UDB Version 8.1 Database Administration upgrade exam, number 706.

This book will save you time and effort because the topics are presented in a clear and concise manner, and we use figures, examples, case studies, and review questions to reinforce the material as it is presented. The book is different than many others on the subject because of the following.

1. Visual learning: The book relies on visual learning as its base. Each chapter starts with a "big picture" to introduce the topics to be discussed in that chapter. Numerous graphics are used throughout thechapters to explain concepts in detail. We feel that figures allow for fast, easy learning and longer retention of the material. If you forget some of the concepts discussed in the book or just need a quick refresher, you will not need to read the entire chapter again. You can simply look at the figures quickly to refresh your memory. For your convenience, some of the most important figures are provided in color on the CD-ROM accompanying this book. These figures in color can further improve your learning experience.

2. Clear explanations: We have encountered many situations when reading other books where paragraphs need to be read two, three, or even more times to grasp what they are describing. In this book we have made every effort possible to provide clear explanations so that you can understand the information quickly and easily.

3. Examples, examples, examples: The book provides many examples and case studies that reinforce the topics discussed in each chapter. Some of the examples have been taken from real life experiences that the authors have had while working with DB2 customers.

4. Sample exam questions: All chapters end with review questions that are similar to the questions on the DB2 Certification exams. These questions are intended to ensure that you understand the concepts discussed in each chapter before proceeding, and as a study guide for the IBM Certification exams. Appendix A contains the answers with explanations.

Getting Started

If you are new to DB2 and would like to get the most out of this book, we suggest you start reading from the beginning and continue with the chapters in order. If you are new to DB2 but are in a hurry to get a quick understanding of DB2, you can jump to Chapter 2, DB2 at a Glance: The Big Picture. Reading this chapter will introduce you to the main concepts of DB2. You can then go to other chapters to read for further details.

If you would like to follow the examples provided with the book, you need to install DB2. Chapter 3, Installing DB2, gives you the details to handle this task.

A Word of Advice

In this book we use figures extensively to introduce and examine DB2 concepts. While some of the figures may look complex, don't be overwhelmed by first impressions! The text that accompanies them explains the concepts in detail. If you look back at the figure after reading the description, you will be surprised by how much clearer it is.

This book only discusses DB2 UDB for Linux, UNIX, and Windows, so when we use the term DB2, we are referring to DB2 UDB on those platforms. DB2 UDB for iSeries, DB2 UDB for OS/390 and z/OS, and DB2 UDB for VM and VSE are mentioned only when presenting methods that you can use to access these databases from an application written on Linux, UNIX, or Windows. When DB2 UDB for iSeries, DB2 UDB for OS/390 and z/OS, and DB2 UDB for VM and VSE are discussed, we refer to them explicitly.



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