University of Chicago Law Review: Volume 79, Number 4 - Fall 2012

University of Chicago Law Review: Volume 79, Number 4 - Fall 2012

by University of Chicago Law Review

NOOK Book(eBook)

$0.99
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

University of Chicago Law Review: Volume 79, Number 4 - Fall 2012 by University of Chicago Law Review

A leading law review offers a quality ebook edition. This fourth issue of 2012 features articles from internationally recognized legal scholars, and extensive research in Comments authored by University of Chicago Law School students. Contents for the issue are:

• Elected Judges and Statutory Interpretation
by Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl & Ethan J. Leib

• Delegation in Immigration Law
by Adam B. Cox & Eric A. Posner

• What If Religion Is Not Special?
by Micah Schwartzman

COMMENTS:

• A Common Law Approach to D&O Insurance “In Fact” Exclusion Disputes

• Taming the Hydra: Prosecutorial Discretion under the Acceptance of Responsibility
Provision of the US Sentencing Guidelines

• Are Railroads Liable When Lightning Strikes?

• Who’s Allowed to Kill the Radio Star? Forfeiture Jurisdiction under the Communications Act

• Federal Diversity Jurisdiction and American Indian Tribal Corporations

• The Right to Trial by Jury under the WARN Act

The issue also includes a Review Essay by Saul Levmore, analyzing the Public Choice implications of "Why the Law Is So Perverse" by Leo Katz

In the NOOKBook edition, Tables of Contents are active, including those for individual articles; footnotes are fully linked and properly numbered; graphs and figures are reproduced legibly; URLs in footnotes are active; and proper eBook formatting is used.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940016015736
Publisher: Quid Pro, LLC
Publication date: 01/18/2013
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 471
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

The University of Chicago Law Review first appeared in 1933, thirty-one years after the Law School offered its first classes. Since then the Law Review has continued to serve as a forum for the expression of ideas of leading professors, judges, and practitioners, as well as students, and as a training ground for University of Chicago Law School student-editors.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews