Using Co-Operative Inquiry to Raise Awareness of the Leadership and Organizational Culture in an English Primary School

Using Co-Operative Inquiry to Raise Awareness of the Leadership and Organizational Culture in an English Primary School

by V. J. Thacker

Hardcover

$129.95

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780773482722
Publisher: Mellen, Edwin Press, The
Publication date: 01/01/1998
Series: Studies in Education
Pages: 452
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 1.50(h) x 9.50(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgementsxvii
Forewordxix
List of Figuresxvi
List of Tablesxvi
Introduction1
Chapter 1'Appreciative inquiry': A co-operative way of doing research7
A starting point7
Outside researcher: 'Why this school and why then?'7
The school in its context8
Inside researcher12
Comments13
Dramatis personae14
Full-time teaching staff14
Part-time teaching staff16
Ancillary staff16
University Researcher17
Getting agreement17
A new way of doing research22
A new view of science25
Implications for research26
A different world view27
Issues raised by the study30
Trust31
Trustworthiness31
Critical distance32
Protecting the management35
Participation35
Particular role of the outside researcher37
Fleshing out the model38
Chapter 2Surfacing the culture49
Forming: The question is 'How shall we do it?'49
Forming50
Storming50
Norming51
Performing51
Storming: Reading the transcripts--'They are interesting but not the Fernhill way'54
Interlude between the third and fourth meeting60
Storming62
Interlude: Individual interviews77
Performing78
Taking stock at Christmas 199289
Chapter 3Making sense of the data97
Naming the elements of the organizational culture97
Bringing us all up to date98
Images begin to emerge108
Generating cultural concepts109
Recognizing the darker side of life114
Finding a way forward117
Map making on a wall124
Confirming the map and showing a mandala127
Interlude132
An ending and a 'new' beginning133
Summer term 1993134
Chapter 4The organizational culture and leadership displayed137
Methodology of the analysis of staff culture and leadership137
The organizational culture142
1.A starting point. We are all learners on a journey142
All are learners142
Individuals and thus the school are travelling on a journey142
2.The Fernhill way is...142
Through struggle142
Through fear143
Through the shadow side being acknowledged, not projected144
Through following the maxim 'If you take care of the process, the task takes care of itself'146
3.Goals146
Awareness of self and others146
Developing a person from the inside146
Whole person priorities147
4.The Fernhill way requires...147
Honesty147
Being real148
Real personal connection149
Being here as a person--not just in a role150
Integrity151
5.Standards demanded151
Challenged here--by yourself151
Challenged here--by others153
Expectations154
Sense of quality154
Responsibility155
Inner discipline156
Standards--professional values held against the view of some parents156
6.Outcomes enabled157
Empowerment157
Creativity is freed158
Energized158
Constructive freedom159
Risk allowed160
'Anything is possible'161
Permission. Saying 'Yes' and being open161
Confidence--good self-esteem162
7.Permissions163
Failure is instructive if you reflect on it163
OK to make mistakes163
8.Support for the Fernhill way163
Not competitive164
Trust165
Safety for risks166
Mutual support166
Unconditional acceptance168
Little or no judgment168
Everyone valued (all who are present are included)169
Everyone valued--but a difficulty over some parents171
Everyone valued--but some children don't appreciate173
Sense of individual worth174
Mutual respect174
People really listen175
9.Underpinnings of support176
Physical contact176
Emotional support177
Bonding177
Really caring177
Love178
Humanity181
Nurturing nature of group182
Spiritual quality182
Culture seen in structures and processes182
10.Quality of environment183
11.Sense of ritual especially as seen in the school assembly184
12.Leadership creates protected space and time185
13.'Cascade' or 'How we are with each other affects how we are with the children'187
14.Sense of the indefinable189
The leadership194
Hands off198
Gives space198
Gives trust199
Manages boundaries--filters external demands199
Models lack of busy-ness201
Makes self available202
Models Fernhill qualities202
Hands on203
Holds formal power203
Chooses staff204
Holds vision206
Maintains standards208
Self208
Others209
Against parents and Governors210
Jobs list210
Curriculum philosophical211
Point of readiness211
Devolving tasks211
Giving responsibility211
Seeding ideas212
Practical213
Connecting with the structure213
Mundane jobs213
Working with non-teaching staff213
Routines213
Maintains fabric213
Personal qualities214
Consistent214
Acts decisively214
Being real214
Struggle216
Risking216
Chapter 5Organizational culture and leadership219
Organizational culture--What it is and why it is important219
Culture or cultures?221
Thinking about culture223
Form226
Substance227
Basic Underlying Assumptions at the level of 'Mind and Heart sets'228
1.Humanity's relationship to the environment228
2.The nature of human activity228
3.The nature of reality and truth229
4.The nature of time230
5.The nature of space230
6.The nature of human nature231
7.The nature of human relationships231
8.Homogeneity vs. conformity232
Leadership and change in the culture over time232
Leadership actions234
Establishing the culture--Primary embedding mechanisms234
1.By criteria for recruitment, selection, promotion, retirement and excommunication234
2.By criteria for allocation of rewards and status234
3.By what they pay attention to, measure and control235
4.By their reaction to 'critical incidents'235
5.By their deliberate role modelling, teaching, and coaching236
Maintaining the culture237
1.By design of physical space237
2.The organization design and structure238
3.Design of systems and procedures238
4.Stories, legends, myths and parables about important events and people238
5.Formal statements of organizational philosophy, creeds and charters238
6.By holding a vision and articulating it239
Chapter 6The school as a particular type of organization241
Introduction241
Handy and Aitken's 'Four features of schools'241
'No time for management'241
'The pile of purposes'245
'Role-switching'248
'The children'253
Size254
Environment255
Geography255
Social/political255
History256
Senior management257
Primary task of an organization258
Chapter 7Inquiry into the forms of the Fernhill culture259
Introduction and recapitulation259
Assemblies262
Use of the grounds273
Group work278
Staff-meetings292
How visitors are treated304
How we deal with difficult children310
Chapter 8Joining the Fernhill culture--induction and 'coming home'321
Joining Fernhill321
Older hands335
Jacqui Matthews335
Sally Larkin337
Chapter 9Fernhill--a culture of collaboration?341
Chapter 10Putting it all together at the classroom level363
The relationship between leadership, culture, and class-teaching--a case-study and the results of an Ofsted report363
Educational principles at Fernhill366
The whole and the parts378
Fernhill--an image378
Preparation398
Notes on the observation of Elinor on the 2nd November 1993400
Spitting Lila404
An ending and a beginning405
Bibliography409
Index417

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