The Vampire of New York

The Vampire of New York

by Lee Hunt, Lee M. Hunt

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Overview

Enoch Bale stalked the streets of New York City nearly one hundred and fifty years ago.

He is long dead.

He is long forgotten.

But he is not long gone...

Archaeologist Carrie Norton makes a startling find in a historic New York City site: the remains of a Civil War-era murder victim. Detective Max Slattery sees something more-uncanny parallels to a recent series of brutal slayings. What seems impossible becomes terrifyingly real as Carrie and Max's investigation unearths a conspiracy between the living and the dead nearly two centuries in the making-one that has yet to claim its final victims.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451222794
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/02/2008
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 4.36(w) x 7.14(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

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Vampire of New York 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
mtnbiker1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I just finished this book and thought it was a very enjoyable romp through Civil War era New York City! The historical viewpoint reminded me of Caleb Carr or Harold Schechter, and I of course am very fond of vampire novels. Probably the only thing I found a little bit tiresome was how the book actually ended. Other than the ending I enoyed this one quite a bit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book started off good but about 2/3 of the way through things got confusing. The ending felt like a poorly structured attempt to wrap up a complex story with little explanation of how things occurred. Also editing problems, such as using the wrong character's name, made this a less than enjoyable read.
harstan More than 1 year ago
During the American Civil War Echo Van Helsing comes to New York seeking revenge on Count Draculiya. The Count was driven out of Bohemia and London by Abraham Van Helsing, who thought Draculiya was pure evil. Echo believes he killed her father and she intends to pay him back in kind once she finds him. Pinkerton Agent Kate Warene helps Echo on her quest as she seeks to end the terror of a serial killer preying on women this predator violently rips out their throats, and leaves behind a double eagle gold coin in their bodies.-------------- In the present the Lincoln Corporation hires archeologist Dr. Carrie Norton to determine if there is any historical treasure that would prevent them from building high priced condos on a piece of land they own in Manhattan. No one is more surprised than Carrie is when the corpse of a perfectly preserved black man is found below ground with his throat ripped out and a gold coin in his body. As in 1863 many women have recently been murdered with their throats ripped apart and a double eagle gold coin left behind in their bodies. Carrie sees a connection although she does not understand how or what, but investigates learning much about her bloodlines as she does re a world that should not exist outside of literature and the movies. She allies with a creature who cannot be real as they work as a team to end the serial killings haunting New York.------------------- Lee Hunt writes a bold different version of the vampire thriller in which he builds on Stoker¿s mythos and prime protagonist with the transference to Manhattan past and present. The chapters rotate between 1863 and today so that the audience can compare two generations of vampire hunters as well as a sly killing machine readily adapting to any environs. Although Echo is more of a professional hunter, she and the tyro amateur Carrie share much in common as both are brave, independent and obstinate yet quite different especially in their respective objective beyond the outcome of ending the terror. THE VAMPIRE OF NEW YORK is an enjoyable horror thriller, as no one not even Giuliani will want to bring it on after sunset.----------------- Harriet Klausner