Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa

Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa

by R.A. Scotti
3.2 31

Paperback(Large Print)

$17.08 $23.95 Save 29% Current price is $17.08, Original price is $23.95. You Save 29%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa by R.A. Scotti

On August 21, 1911, the unfathomable happened–Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa vanished from the Louvre. More than twenty-four hours passed before museum officials realized she was gone. The prime suspects were as shocking as the crime: Pablo Picasso and Guillaume Apollinaire, young provocateurs of a new art. As French detectives using the latest methods of criminology, including fingerprinting, tried to trace the thieves, a burgeoning international media hyped news of the heist.

No story captured the imagination of the world quite like this one. Thousands flocked to the Louvre to see the empty space where the painting had hung. They mourned as if Mona Lisa were a lost loved one, left flowers and notes, and set new attendance records. For more than two years, Mona Lisa’s absence haunted the art world, provoking the question: Was she lost forever? A century later, questions still linger.

Part love story, part mystery, Vanished Smile reopens the case...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780739328361
Publisher: Diversified Publishing
Publication date: 04/07/2009
Edition description: Large Print
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

R. A. Scotti is the author of Vanished Smile, a 2010 Edgar Award nominee, as well as three previous works of nonfiction, including Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal—Building St. Peter’s and Sudden Sea: The Great Hurricane of 1938, and four novels.  She lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
regina77004 More than 1 year ago
This book is promoted as a historical fiction piece but reads like a well documented non fiction work with ample foot notes and inclusion of quotes from primary sources. I will warn that if you are reading this for the mystery aspect you may be disappointed because the book focuses more on the history of Paris, The Mona Lisa, and the emergence of modern art in all of its conflicts with Renaissance art. That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. There were many theories afloat as to the responsible parties from Picasso and Apollonaire, to the government in order to deflect tension from the approaching war, to emerging American wealthy intent on increasing their holdings, to those trying to expose the inadequacies of The Louvre security. Scotti lays out the evidence and events in a concise interesting read.
coepii More than 1 year ago
A disappointment at best. Stretched from a two page newspaper article to a book with little insight or resolve.
willardcat More than 1 year ago
I really looked forward to this book. The subject was very interesting and unknown to me. It was not the exciting book that we are used to. The way this was presented made it sound like another "DaVinci Code." However this was very factual reading, not the truly thrilling. I'm glad I read the story, but it is not one of my favorite books.
gedCA More than 1 year ago
“By 1911 the fleecing of American millionaires was a cottage industry in Europe.”—page 148 Who knew? Probably millions of people, but I wasn’t one of them. 'Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa,' by R. A. Scotti was my introduction to the fact that the Mona Lisa had once been stolen from the Louvre in Paris—a very high profile art theft by an apparently low profile, even amateurish, but very successful, thief. Was he but one more foil of a capable con-man? Or are we, the readers? And what about those wild and crazy friends of Picasso? Recommendation: This is a very good, true-crime, whodunit and why. “…but it is a fine, romantic tale, which ought to be true if it isn’t.”—page 163 NOOKbook from Barnes and Noble, 184 pages
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WA6UVF More than 1 year ago
After reading this book one can understand why the "Mona Lisa" has reently been moved to a more secure area with massive layers of protective shielding. Ones now taking photos will capture themselves to reflect society today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago