The Vault (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #23)

The Vault (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #23)

by Ruth Rendell
4.2 41

Paperback

$16.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Wednesday, January 24 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Vault (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #23) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anything Ruth Rendell writes is a great read. When I first discovered Ruth Rendell I thought of her as a female Alfred Hitchcock. Her stories are unique, never dull and will turn you on your head at times. She writes about situations you would consider a dark thought if they were yours. Her characters are developed gradually and at the end you understand why they are as they are. I have read everything Ruth Rendell has written and can't wait for her next book.
druidgirl More than 1 year ago
This was my first Inspector Wexford book and it will not be my last. It held my interest and peaked my curiosity throughout. A retired inspector being asked to help the police on a tough and old case adds his experience and knowledge to the local police. He also has a few problems of his own to sort out. But all the twists and turns of the story keeps the readers attention until the very end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a bloody disappointment. Too many characters and no surprises and dull dull dull.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read many books by Ruth Rendell,and I would recommend this one to everyone who enjoys a good mystery.I would also recommend it for a book discussion.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
What started out promisingly enough tuned into quite a dull book. The pace just plodded along with little suspense being built as not a whole lot was happening. A waste of my time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nice..
cellopets More than 1 year ago
Although I'd previously read, 'A Sight for Sore Eyes', it was a long time ago, so I decided to give myself a real treat and buy it, and, 'The Vault', for my holiday reading. I was thoroughly satisfied, and highly recommend them. I've been reading Ruth Rendell for years, although I have to be careful to time my reads to coincide with internal sunniness, because she can be very dark. A Sight for Sore Eyes is the kind of Rendell I sometimes need to protect myself from temporarily, but having The Vault to go to right away took away the sting. And in The Vault, Rendell allows us a kind of closure that I wouldn't mind seeing from her more often (although I realize I'm a wuss and she's a genius). On top of that, Wexford seems to grow more and more lovable and admirable with age. I actually found myself hoping that he could stay alive longer than I do, because I think I would mourn him like a real person. Usually I am at best grudgingly tolerant of, or, at worst, downright annoyed at, the side plots in the personal lives of detectives, cops, and amateur sleuths, and the fact that I keep thinking about Wexford's interactions with his granddaughters is further proof for me that Rendell is a genius. Hope she's writing another Wexford right now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tedfeit0 More than 1 year ago
Old soldiers may just fade away, but apparently not so Reginald Wexford. Retired as a chief inspector, free to read and enjoy his leisure, now that he also has access to a second home in London, he is chomping at the bit. When he gets a phone call from Tom Ede, now a detective superintendent, asking him to act as a consultant on an unusual case, he jumps at the chance. The police investigation is at a standstill. Four bodies were discovered down a coal chute, three apparently there for more than a decade, another just a couple of years. Who are they? Why hadn’t they been discovered before? Why were they murdered, and who killed them? Painstakingly, Wexford pursues each elusive “clue,” logically and doggedly. Just as important is his intuition, which propels him forward, conjuring new theories and assisting his analysis. Artfully written, the author provides a sweeping view of London as Wexford follows the various paths leading to solving the mystery. Especially poignant is a side story involving Wexford’s daughter. Recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BookCore More than 1 year ago
So far: Rendell is my favorite author, Wexford is one of my favorite characters, and "Sight for Sore Eyes" had one of Rendell's best villains - really looking forward to this! After finish: It was so good to see Wexford again, I didn't mind that not much attention was paid to Teddy, the villain of "Sight for Sore Eyes." There was a new quirk added, just to make things interesting, and I enjoyed following that. Also, Wexford's daughter Sylvia once again did something really boneheaded. I disapprove of parents who have a favorite child; and I still think that their blatant preference for Sheila might have damaged Sylvia, and maybe that's why she does boneheaded things. But y'know, she must be in her late 40s by now. I don't blame Wexford and Dora for finally getting fed up with her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fe More than 1 year ago
Seamlessly flowed from first installment-"A Sight For Sore Eyes", but stands alone with the introduction of new characters and story line.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Um...