Venetia

Venetia

by Georgette Heyer
4.3 56

Paperback

$18.06 $18.99 Save 5% Current price is $18.06, Original price is $18.99. You Save 5%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Tuesday, November 28 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Venetia 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 56 reviews.
Balina More than 1 year ago
Such a good read. beautifully written. will buy more.
AustenStudent More than 1 year ago
This is a very mature historical romance novel. It reminds me of Jane Austen’s Persuasion with its two older protagonists and, like Austen, there is a lot of clever and witty dialogue that moves the story forward as hero and heroine get to know one another. They become good natured friends who also happen to be very attracted to each other.  Venetia Lanyon is a very elegant and level headed woman. Raised in the countryside of Yorkshire and considered “on the shelf” at five and twenty, she lives quietly with her eccentric and sickly younger brother, Aubrey. She feels the beginnings of attraction to well-known rake, Lord Damarel, their nearest neighbor. He befriends both Venetia and Aubrey after Aubrey suffers a riding accident near his estate. Aubrey stays with Damarel at  his estate, known as the Priory, while he recuperates and Venetia visits him there, much to the shock of their country society, including her two stuffed-shirt suitors. But Damarel quickly distances himself from Venetia once he realizes that he feels much more for her than he wants to or intended. He fears for her reputation that an acquaintance with him might endanger her reputation. She is heartbroken but doesn’t show it or dramatize; she is a true lady to all outward appearances, even if she is pained when he harshly trivializes their “idyll” in the country. When her eldest brother, Conway, takes Charlotte, a timid young woman, as his wife who will displace her as lady of the house—encouraged along by Charlotte’s harridan of a mother, Venetia travels to London for a Season.  This is a dialogue heavy and introspective novel read beautifully by Phyllida Nash. Her voice is appropriately deep and older sounding for the pushing forty Damarel—to tell the truth, he’s exactly Mr. Knightley’s age, thirty-eight, so not so very old after all. And she reads Venetia with an air of elegant ease and confidence, aptly capturing her self-assuredness, her no nonsense personality, and maturity. The scene when Damarel separates himself from Venetia is quite heartbreaking to hear, a sure sign of an effective reader. I admire Venetia’s determination to make a home for herself when she realizes that marriage isn’t a possibility, even if Edward Yardley persists in his most unwanted attentions. She refuses to marry if she cannot marry for love, a position that takes great strength of character and fortitude in a time when women usually had to marry to survive. And, despite her aunt’s disapproval, she forges ahead on plans to take a house for herself and to live her own life. When circumstances bring Venetia’s long lost mother back into her life and she learns of some interference that threatens to thwart her own happiness, she smoothly takes control once again. I had to almost smile, however, at the lighthearted way that both Aubrey and Venetia talk about their mother, a self-centered woman who has absented herself from the family for years. They seem not the least bit bothered by her lack of maternal love and affection, nor even at the scandalous divorce of their parents. Perhaps this is a case of the famous British “stiff upper lip” and all that? Anyway, it is quite amusing to this American reader. Venetia was published in 1958, later in Heyer’s prolific and successful career.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So, I bought this because it was the less expensive edition. Little did I know that it was in Spanish. Nothing about this book indicated it was a Spanish translation. The book description is even in English. Now I'm stuck with a book I can't read. :(
meDC More than 1 year ago
Venetia was the first Heyer book I read years ago. It was also the first book I bought for my Nook. Such a great story. If you haven't read Heyer, start with this one (or possibly Regency Buck).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you know Georgette Heyer books, you know what to expect when you pick up one of her Regency Novels. Venetia is a fun read. Heyer's descriptions bring you back to the time and what the lives of the aristocracy were like. Her books are to be read, set aside, and re-read at a later date.
Anonymous 7 days ago
Venetia and the wicked baron, the slayer of innocent damsels. Great characters and excellent dialogue. No simpering misses making their debut to the ton, but real life characters with scars and foibles. I reread this every few years and always discover something anew.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is in Spanish!!!!!! B and N, you owe me a refund!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although the description is in English, this version of the book is in Spanish! Not helpful B&N! Wasted money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the wit and the characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ishgh More than 1 year ago
All Georgette Heyer books are great, Venetia is feisty, she gets thing done.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ask any two people their favorite Heyer and you'll get at least three answers. For me, it's easy, it's "Venetia" all the way. I enjoy almost all of Heyer's Regencies, but this is my favorite for three reasons. The first is the give and take between the hero and the heroine. The second is that the author makes you believe that two such disparate characters can find a common meeting ground. The third is that her heroine, despite an existence that was very sheltered in many ways, never came across as stupid or naive. Read it once for the dialogue and then read it again for the characters.
EntertainingCM More than 1 year ago
Another Regency romance. Very entertaining
Anonymous More than 1 year ago