Versailles: A Novel

Versailles: A Novel

by Kathryn Davis
3.7 11

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Versailles 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kathryn Davis beautifully portrays the life of Marie Antoinette in her novel Versailles. From the time she is married to her death on the guillotine. It reads as if Marie Antoinette were relating the events of her brief life now, from heaven when she¿s had some time to think things over. Because she is dead, her perspective is in tangible. Therefore, the book was set up with her wandering in and out of what happened, through prose, poetry and playwriting; conversations at which she wasn¿t present; the many rooms and garden pathways and stairways of Versailles; and the motions of history. It flows perfectly through all the many rooms in the palace of Versailles, and stairs, and the occasional play without skipping a beat. This alive book is full of history and is entertaining, and amazingly live.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't think I am sticking out my neck by saying that this book is fascinating and insightful. Although it shouldn't be read as a history lesson, it does provide such lessons obliquely. It reads as if written in French and then beautifully translated into English. If you know French, you can easily reverse-translate it as you go along. See the film "Marie Antoinette" with Norma Shearer right after reading the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is not the usual story told by a historical figure. There's a twist in the way the tale is told. Not that easy to follow, if told be truth. Yet it is intriguing and touching. It's easier to read if you have some knowledge on Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. I did enjoy this book but I was puzzled at times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was hoping for something more historical. This novella seems to be a flippant assortment of tales from the queen's life. While the author is clever in telling the story as a tour of Versaille, the fact that the chapters are no more than 3-7 pages long does not give an ample sense of either Versailles or the wife of Louis XVI. Quite a disappointment. I would not recommend this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book MIGHT be a must for poetic Marie Antoinette fans, but was very hard to follow and sort-of-say boring.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The comlexity of events and personalities that caused the Storm of Revolution to commence in 1789 is far beyond Miss Davis' light weight grasp of the subject. Her fantasy confection gives Marie Antoinette the predictable persona of a XXth century woman from rich suburbs, country clubs and designer boutiques. Is the author inable or simply clueless as to the genuine nature of the Aristocratic and Royal players who inhabited the late 18th century? Perhaps it explains why the characters are of "20th century experience" dressed in and surrounded by a mediocre period stage set. Miss Davis commits a great act of hubris by attempting to suppose the inner thoughts and secrets of this Hapsburg Archduchess who became Queen of France. The many insults and indignities Marie Antoinette suffered ended Oct 1793. It is a blessing that she will never suffer from reading this poorly crafted make believe story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nothing new or even very deep. Just a very pretty retelling of the Marie Antoinette story.Something like a ice cream sundae on a hot afternoon
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is beautifully written, and the author makes it clear that it is a work of fiction. This is not meant as a biography of Marie Antoinette's life, but a fictional account of the goings-on of her mind.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. The language is rich and the images fascinating. Its purpose is not historic, though the title may lead you to think so, but rather poetic. It has an immediacy, a deftness in rendering of thought into form, that makes you feel each word, and revisit sentences and paragraphs as you read.