A View from the Bridge

A View from the Bridge

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Overview

A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller

In this Tony Award winning play, longshoreman Eddie Carbone is obsessed with his niece, Catherine, and his unhealthy and inappropriate feelings for her are inflamed when his wife's relatives arrive from Italy.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781857584936
Publisher: Letts Educational
Publication date: 01/31/1997
Pages: 61
Product dimensions: 5.92(w) x 8.22(h) x 0.15(d)

About the Author

Arthur Miller was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock. He has also written two novels, Focus (1945), and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. More recent works include a memoir, Timebends (1987), and the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1993), which won the Olivier Award for Best Play of the London Season, and Mr. Peter's Connections (1998). His latest book is On Politics and the Art of Acting. Miller was granted with the 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

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A View from the Bridge 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This play is a perfect example of what a playwright should strive for. Miller illustrates everyting in such a way that makes you not want to stop reading until you're done. Clearly structured and has an unbelievable climax. I'd call it an extremely sophisticated soap opera.
emma-bear_ More than 1 year ago
A View From the Bridge by Arthur Miller, is the story of Eddie Carbone, a seemingly normal Brooklyn man, who works unloading ships, and lives with his wife, Beatrice, and his orphaned niece, Catherine. It is obvious from the start of this play that Eddie and Catherine have a very strong relationship, as though she was really his daughter. Or so it seems... When Beatrice's cousins from Italy illegally immigrate to America, they stay with Eddie and his family. Their names are Marco and Rodolpho. Marco is happily married with three children, and sends all of the money he makes to his children and wife in Italy. Rodolpho is unmarried and soon falls in love with Catherine, as she falls in love with him. Eddie soon becomes more and more jealous of Rodolpho, because his love for Catherine is more than just a father/daughter love, it is a sexual kind of love. Eddie eve tries to convince himself that Rodolpho is gay because he can cook, sew, and sing. With a climax beyond belief, and an ending that will leave you shocked, and both glad and sad, Arthur Miller wrote an absolutely wonderful play.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
It's well-written and keeps you reading. I'm not a big play reader but this one was worht it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
it is ok because it only proove Arthur just wanted to write by that time and did not know what to write.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had high hopes for this play. When I read the description of it, it sounded like something I would really enjoy. But when I was finished reading it, I didn't feel the same emotional satisfaction I experienced after reading All My Sons. This was definately not his best, or even close to it. Right now I'm reading Death of a Salesman in school, and in the few short pages that I have read, it was 10 times better than A View From The Bridge.