Visibility

Visibility

by Boris Starling
3.5 8

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Visibility 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book incorporates many historical details that are very intriguing. However, I found the first half of the book to be extremely slow. It was hard to stay focused when reading, but I managed and it was worth it. The 2nd half of the book makes up for the slow start! After struggling to read the first part of the book, there was finally a point where I could not put the book down. Literally, I read it in one sitting! Overall a good book if you get past the first part. Left me doing further research to find out more about the historical aspects. I always consider this a plus. A historical based book should leave you wanting to know more about the real "truth."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I personally love books set in this time period (post WW2). Good use of location (London) and interesting plot.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While I haven't read any of Starling's other books, this books gives me the feeling I'd be wasting my time with them as well. This book was literally a chore to read. Each chapter made me want to go do something else, but I stuck with it. And now I sorely miss those hours of my life. The only good thing, I would say, would be the cover. Beautifully made and definitely catches the eye. This book almost says nothing about the Nazis, if that is what drew you to the book as it did me. When I see a swastika on the cover, I want there to be a Nazi villain, or at least a cult of some sort. Instead it's mostly about communism and the cold war. They should of put a sickle and a hammer around that double-helix. If you want to be bored, then this is the book for you. If not, it's a waste of your time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As far as Boris Starling books go, Messiah was truly a work of art, a very very good book. Storm was a terrible book. Vodka was ambitious, credible and full of information, but ultimately lacking in excitement. Clearly Starling's books cover a wide range, but in Visibitly he equals the greatness of Messiah. Amazing twists, fascinating historical details and he never loses sight that his goal is to write a good story. I was worried for a while, but Boris Starling has returned! A must read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author was able to conglomerate his multiple themes between the covers of the book, however the continuing relevance was severly lacking. The first and last Starling book I shall read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1952 former M15 operative, Herbert Smith works as a homicide detective with the Metropolitan Police's Murder Squad. His current case seems like a no brainer accident caused by the thick fog a man drowned in a Kensington Gardens pond.--------------- However instead of closing the book, Smith tries to at least uncover the identity of the dead floater. He succeeds as the deceased is King's College graduate student Max Stensness. The sleuth also learns that Max was gay and an active member of the Communist Party. Smith finds a tie to his former M15 boss, odious Richard de Vere Green. Hating Green whose treachery cost him his MI5 position, Smith keeps digging hoping to destroy his sneaky deceitful supervisor. Smith begins to find a connection to the Russians and the Americans as Stensness was apparently selling top-secret DNA information to the highest bidder, but the detective wonders if Green was the silent partner.------------------ Using real people like double Nobel Prize winner Pauling and incognito Nazi criminal Mengele to anchor the 1950s anti-Communist fervor that swept America (McCarthy era ¿sounds similar to today¿s official scares) and somewhat England, Boris Starling provides readers with an exciting deep espionage thriller. The story line looks at the salad days of DNA research combining it with the Red scare and the WWII aftermath still devastatingly visible in foggy London. Readers will appreciate this fast-paced period piece that grips the audience with a whodunit spy thriller.-------------- Harriet Klausner