Votes for Women!: American Suffragists and the Battle for the Ballot

Votes for Women!: American Suffragists and the Battle for the Ballot

by Winifred Conkling

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781616207342
Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers
Publication date: 02/13/2018
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 100,780
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range: 13 - 17 Years

About the Author


Winifred Conkling is an award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction for young readers, including Passenger on the Pearl, Radioactive!, and the middle-grade novel Sylvia & Aki. You can find her online at winifredconkling.com.

Table of Contents

Preface "Aye" 1

Chapter 1 "Oh, my daughter, I wish you were a boy!": Before Seneca Falls 6

Chapter 2 "All men and women are created equal": Seneca Falls Convention, 1848 30

Chapter 3 "The right is ours": Creating a National Suffrage Movement 43

Chapter 4 "In thought and sympathy we were one": A Feminist Friendship 62

Chapter 5 "You must be true alike to the women and the negroes": Division in the Suffrage Movement 80

Chapter 6 "Madam, you are not a citizen": Victoria Woodhull Speaks to Congress 107

Chapter 7 "I have been & gone & done it!!": Susan B. Anthony Votes for President 128

Chapter 8 "We ask justice, we ask equality": Forward, Step by Step 144

Chapter 9 "Failure is impossible!": The Next Generation 171

Chapter 10 "Votes for Women": The Second Wave of Suffragists 180

Chapter 11 "How long must women wait for liberty?": Parades and Protests 193

Chapter 12 "Power belongs to good": The Silent Sentinels 215

Chapter 13 "This ordeal was the most terrible torture": Hungering for Justice 239

Chapter 14 "Don't forget to be a good boy": The Battle for Ratification 258

In Her Own Words: Key Primary Sources 273

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792): Mary Wollstonecraft 273

Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and the Condition of Woman (1838): Sarah Grimké 273

Declaration of Sentiments (1848): Elizabeth Cady Stanton 274

"Ain't I a Woman?" (1851): Sojourner Truth 274

Wedding Vows of Lucy Stone and Henry Blackwell (1855) 275

"Are Women Persons?": Susan B. Anthony's Address after Her Arrest for Illegal Voting (1873) 275

Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (1920) 275

The Suffrage Sisters: A Timeline 276

Bibliography 280

Books 280

Films 283

Manuscript Collections 283

Websites 284

Places of Interest 284

Notes 285

Acknowledgments 305

Index 307

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Votes for Women!: American Suffragists and the Battle for the Ballot 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous 28 days ago
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
Thanks to NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers for the opportunity to read and review Votes for Women! by Winifred Conkling which tells the story of events that took place between the beginning of the women’s rights movement in 1848 and when women were given the right to vote in 1920. The appendix includes a list of the primary sources used for this book’s research and there’s also a timeline included. The preface describes how women from both sides of the suffrage movement approached a political candidate for his support in 1920. I’m shocked that some women were actually against having the right to vote! The story opens with an eleven year old Elizabeth Cady (eventually Elizabeth Cady Stanton) mourning the loss of her twenty year old brother Eleazar, the last male heir in the family. Her father is inconsolable and she makes it a mission to be everything her brother was and this became the beginning of Elizabeth’s goal towards learning and courage. The support for women’s rights is impressive and includes Frederick Douglass (an escaped slave and civil rights leader), Sojourner Truth (an escaped slave and strong speaker) and Susan B. Anthony (abolitionist) and many more supporters. A march for the suffrage movement in 1913 became so powerful that a mob forced the marchers into a single file. The marchers suffered from police brutality and this brutality was helpful to the movement because women gained public sympathy and attention. Picketers in 1917 took their stand in front of the White House and were arrested for “obstructing traffic”. These protesters were released eventually because the government was worried that the women would become martyrs. Later in this same year, picketers were sent to workhouses with unsanitary conditions and mistreatment. Alice Paul, the suffrage leader during this time, was severely mistreated and began a hunger strike which many other protesters joined. By 1920, the Senate approved ratification of the 19th Amendment. This is a definitive account of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s and Susan B. Anthony’s and many others’ actions towards women’s rights that will be a perfect source for research. 5 stars! * I received a complimentary copy of this book for voluntary review consideration.