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Waggle
     

Waggle

by Sarah McMenemy
 
Welcome Waggle! A vibrant picture book debut that’s as bright and lively as a brand-new puppy.

Rosie’s new puppy is wiggly, waggly, wonderful! He loves to play, he loves to run, and he loves Rosie best of all - you can tell by the way his tail is always waggling. Now all he needs is a name. What should Rosie call him? First-time author-illustrator

Overview

Welcome Waggle! A vibrant picture book debut that’s as bright and lively as a brand-new puppy.

Rosie’s new puppy is wiggly, waggly, wonderful! He loves to play, he loves to run, and he loves Rosie best of all - you can tell by the way his tail is always waggling. Now all he needs is a name. What should Rosie call him? First-time author-illustrator Sarah McMenemy evokes an enticingly retro feel with her boldly colored, primitive artwork style, while the simple story line and nonstop action will keep even the littlest listeners rapt.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
In McMenemy's easygoing and accomplished debut, illustrated in looping black outlines and soft-edged paper collage, a girl and her father play with their new puppy. "One day Rosie's dad came home early," bringing a white puppy with a saddle-shaped spot on its back. Rosie discovers that "The puppy thought everything was exciting,/ especially the shoes." In understated images that suggest harmless but messy fun, the two investigate a wastepaper basket and a flower garden (" `This is a very muddy puddle,' laughed Rosie./ `Woof, woof, woof,' agreed the puppy"). When the puppy goes on a mad dash and hides somewhere in the house, Rosie notices that its happy tail gives it away: "The curtain was waggling./ Waggle, waggle, waggle!/ ... / Rosie looked at the puppy. `I think we/ should call you Waggle,' she said." Rosie's merriment comes across in the repetitive language, and her father's indulgent smileDeven when a trail of black dots indicates dirty footprints on a floor-suggests the honeymoon phase of dog ownership. McMenemy keeps the storytelling and imagery simple, and quietly builds the blossoming bond between girl and pup. The artist works in a limited set of solid-color construction papers, which are torn into chunky shapes and detailed with a smooth gouache line that recalls Chris Raschka's freestyle doodles; occasional horizontal and vertical swaths of color create multiple panels within a single spread. McMenemy's playful page design and enthusiastic narration convey a family's delight in puppy behavior-and a new talent to watch. Ages 2-5. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Little Rosie's Dad brings home a new puppy, and the two playfully and excitedly romp inside and outside the house�racing in the yard, digging in the dirt and mud, rummaging through wastebaskets and closets of shoes and ties. Throughout it all, the smiles of Dad and Rosie never waver and the pup's tale always waggles. By the end of the day, Rosie knows exactly what to name her pup: Waggle! Both story and pictures are simple, emphasizing the delight the young girl and her dog are finding in each other. McMenemy uses collage and gouache to make illustrations that are bursting with life. Her large, simple shapes are mostly placed against bright, monochromatic backgrounds, although she occasionally makes vertical or horizontal panels on a page using torn strips of paper. The book's design and lively story are sure to charm young listeners, who will want to hear it again. The simple text could also be read by beginning readers. McMenemy's debut is auspicious; keep an eye out for future books by her. 2003, Candlewick Press,
— Peg Glisson
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-When a father gives his daughter a white-and-brown puppy, the child quickly discovers all the mischief a dog can get into, such as overturning wastebaskets, chewing shoes, and digging in the garden. When it comes time to name the pet, the girl realizes the one constant about him has been his active tail, and Waggle becomes his name. Colorful, cartoon illustrations dynamically portray puppy and child energy. However, the story line is slight and Waggle offers no competition to such memorable dogs as Peter McCarty's Hondo, Susan Meddaugh's Martha, or Peggy Rathmann's Gloria.-Carol Schene, Taunton Public Schools, MA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
McMenemy mixes broad strokes of paint with big pieces of torn paper in a debut that seems to wiggle with the same enthusiasm as the tail of the puppy-from-hell she portrays. With a delighted Rosie chasing--sometimes far--behind, the pup her Dad brings home excitedly heads straight for shoes and wastepaper basket, races outside to dig up flowers and to gambol in mud, and then dashes back inside over the bed and into a closet. "What do you think we should call him?" Dad asks. Rosie doesn�t take long to decide (see title), and is last seen receiving a slurp of approval from the new family member. The art is all big, bright, simple shapes against vibrant monochromatic backgrounds, with just a few details sketched in; Rosie and her father never lose their fond smiles (Mom perhaps wisely, is absent), and young readers, too will instantly adore this doggy dynamo. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763620592
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
04/15/2003
Edition description:
1ST US
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.50(w) x 8.75(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Sarah McMenemy graduated from the Brighton College of Art. Her signature use of torn-paper collage combined with paint and ink can be seen on everything from clothing to the London Underground to brochures for the Hudson River Festival of New York City. Sarah found her way to children’s books quite by accident when a series of sketches that she had done as a distraction for her young children captured the interest of an editor. These same sketches were fine-tuned to create WAGGLE, Sarah McMenemy’s first picture book.

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