Wait Till Next Year

Wait Till Next Year

by Doris Kearns Goodwin
4.6 42

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Wait Till Next Year 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
MargieM1 More than 1 year ago
I too was the youngest of three children, and I love Baseball as much as I revear Doris Kearns Goodwin. Not as fortunate as she, I lost my family to divorace at age 11 ( a gem that I never recovered). Baseball always connected my absent father and myself creating what memories I have of him. I was delighted to learn about her and that her memories of childhood ; her neighborhood friends, the catholic church (and its' structure) , the importance of community, and baseball resulted in so much of who we all see when she is on television shows. Her Father gave her the gift of the rules of Baseball game scoring, and her Church gave her the gift of knowing right from wrong. Her friends added dimension and her community gave her the gift of acceptance and understanding of differing views. We are all so lucky that she shares these gifts with us.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't put off reading a truly delightful, moving, and entertaining book. Doris Kearns Goodwin brings back memories of childhood that makes me think she lived my childhood, except I was a Yankees fan. This is laugh out loud funny, covering A-bombs, fall out shelters, family and friends, and baseball, Brooklyn Dodger baseball. You don't have to be a baseball fan to love this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Wait Till Next Year' was my required summer reading book. I'm not intrested in reading, but once I began the book I couldn't put it down. Being a teenage girl and loving baseball, I could relate SOOO much to the book. This would be a great book for those die hard baseball fans!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful story of life in the late 40's and 50's. Once you start reading, it's hard to put down.
ShadyKay More than 1 year ago
I didn't grow up with baseball as part of my life, but after reading this book, I wish I had. Doris lived a magical childhood peppered with some harrowing times. Thank you, Doris, for this wonderful story.
DDriver More than 1 year ago
Wait Till Next Year is a very unconventional book. Doris Kearns Goodwin recreates her past in the post-war error by framing it in the context of both family and baseball. It is a great book from start to finish.
SarahMcClurg More than 1 year ago
Wait 'Till Next Year is a very well written memoir. It is interesting to hear about baseball (and the love of the game) from a female prospective. But, Doris Kearns Goodwin does a fantastic job capturing the sport and its meaning to her growing up. Highly recommended.
BooksonBaseball More than 1 year ago
I have seen Presedential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin appear many times on TV political talk shows. I have also heard her speak on several occasions about her love for the Brooklyn Dodgers. You can imagine mydelight when I came across a copy of her 1997 book Wait Till Next Year: A Memoir at a used book sale. A favorite topic of mine--The Brooklyn Dodgers-- by a favorite writer. This memoir recounts Doris' childhood in the 40s and 50s in Brooklyn and later in Rockville Center, NY. Goodwin uses the season-to-season rhythms of baseball to create the arch of her formative years. She uses this baseball canvass to weave several distinct plot lines, involving family, community, catholicism, and world events. The book is about baseball, but baseball is not its central theme, far from it. Doris has nothing but wonderful memories of her parents; each somewhat flawed, her mother dying at the age of 51 and being sick for most of Doris¡¯ early life. Her father had experienced the death of two siblings and both parents, the last from suicide as a boy and was shipped off to a foster home. Neither parents' situation seemed to negatively impact Doris' relationship with her parents. On the contrary, it helped broaden her appreciation of her parents; an unusual trait for a youngster. Doris grew up the youngest of three sisters by a number of years which thrust her into adult-type conversations. This experience gave her the traits of inquisitiveness and precociousness. This familial experience also seemed to have left her with an indomitably positive person¨Ca trait which comes across throughout her book. Even during the apparent idyllic time of the 50s, many unsettling historical events took place, the polio epidemic, McCarthyism, Little Rock School integration, and nuclear air raid drills being among them. Doris writes about both the Dodgers and the Giants leaving New York city for the West Coast and uses that incident to talk about how the old neighborhood had changed as well, many families moved out to further their careers and status in life as well as the demise of the corner drug store and local butcher shop--both closed down. It seems the end of her childhood perfectly coincided with this dramatic move of two of NYC's homegrown treasures and the disappearance of her beloved neighborhood. Wait contains many wonderful stories from her childhood. --How she and best friend Elaine shared a blanket during the Summer with dueling radios, Doris¡¯ with Red Barber announcing for the Dodgers while Elaine's radio was tuned to Mel Allen broadcasting for the arch enemies, the Yankees. --Doris had a running friendly rivalry with a local butcher shop who owners were rabid fans of the Giants. After Bobby Thomson's historic home run in 1951, Doris couldn¡¯t get herself to visit the butcher shop until they sent her a bouquet of flowers. --How Doris was nervous during her first Catholic confession because she had to admit to the Priest that she wished ill of the opposing teams' players.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being both a baseball and Doris Kearns Goodwin fan, I greatly enjoyed this memoir. If you like reading history: 1940-50's, family, neighborhood connections, and BASEBALL, this is the book. It is entertaining and for others like me, it leads to research about experiences and incidents mentioned in the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book as I grew up in NJ in this time period & can relate to so many things. Well written & very enjoyable. Loved knowing this was a true story. Finally someone who remembers the Dugan man. Found this family's story to be so real & heartfelt. Their love of baseball tied this family & friends together.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I actually recently purchased this book for a gift. I have my own copy, but love this one so much that I like to share it. If you love baseball and you were a kid --- this book will be one of your favorites, too.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Daddy and the Dodgers - what a combination, especially in the all-too-capable hands of Doris Kearns Goodwin. What differentiates this book most from others in the genre is the way in which we also see the emergence of the historian, and the ways in which her upbringing brought out her gift in the area. Wonderful book, not at all sappy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wait Till Next Year is a touching and humorous memoir of life as both a Dodger fan and a young girl in the 1950s. I'm not a huge fan of baseball, but Goodwin's enthusiasm for the game is compelling. I especially love her touching tales of Robinson, Reese, and Labine.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is simply something magical about this extremely touching and wonderfully readable memoir by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Poignant, entertaining, insightful and informative, this is a refreshing retrospective look into our country in the 1950's and the world of a young girl...a world primarily comprised - as she sees it - of those seemingly endless 'Summer Afternoons with [Her] Father and Baseball.' For those of us born into the 'great' technological boom which has effectively engulfed (and I might also argue smothered) American pop 'culture,' the profoundly simple life which Ms. Goodwin depicts in her autobiography is one that I find really fascinating. I also found enormous historical value among Ms. Goodwin's anecdotal recollections; her story is not confined to her personal life and the family and friends who played a part in it. Her memories and perceptions of historical and societal happenings of her day are abundant throughout the memoir. The reader is presented with McCarthyism, for example, through the eyes of a ten year old, and the great Commuter Train crash of 1950 related by a little girl who believed her father might have been in it. These are invaluable historical accounts, offering us wonderfully original and exciting perspectives. And then, of course, there is the phenonemon from which the book gets its title: the Brooklyn Dodgers not quite ever winning the World Series... In 'Wait Till Next Year, ' Ms. Goodwin offers us an enchanting glimpse back into and era that can only be labelled as golden. Historically comprehensive, extremely enjoyable, and a charming piece of Americana, this memoir ranks near the top of my all-time favorite reads. **I would also like to add a brief note regarding the book's author, Doris Kearns Goodwin. Having read her work and seen her speak in person, I find her to be someone worthy of every American's utmost respect and admiration. She is most definitely a woman of extremely impressive intelligence and capability - as well as inherent dignity - and we are very fortunate to have her accomplishments documented in her books, from which we can all learn so much.**
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a WONDERFUL read!!! I absolutely LOVED this book. Ms. Goodwin tells a wonderful story of her childhood in Brooklyn during the 50's. The initial plot line is about the Brooklyn Dodgers, Goodwin's favorite team, as she roots for the hero's of her time. Though, this book is about so much more: her families relationship, her friends, growing up, and most of all change. What a wonderful description of suburban New York during a wonderful time in history.
jimmytico More than 1 year ago
A very sweet and so well-written nostalgic story of a young girl, her family and the passion of loving their baseball team woven throughout. Very enjoyable read. Thank you Doris!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Doris's family and her love for the Dodgers when they were in Brooklyn. Her childhood reminded me a lot about my childhood growing up in Baltimore in the 1950s. We were Oriole fans. My dad took me to Memorial Stadium which was built in 1954. I saw a lot of Hall of Fame players as Doris did. She saw Dodgers like Jackie Robinson and Roy Campenella play.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Memoir is well written and researched. Viewing life in a village in Brooklyn NY through the eyes of a child spans topics such as baseball, neighborhoods, family relationships and hardships, cultural changes such as the influence of that new invention television and upward mobility, McCarthyism, the threat of atom bomb annihilation, and more. Kearns again creates a well drawn picture, this time of her own life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MUST READ FOR BASEBALL FANZ
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
bleacherbum99 More than 1 year ago
Great look at baseball in the 50s, and specifically the Brooklyn Dodgers. Doris Kearns Goodwins shows what is was like growing up rooting for a team that didn't win the big one--but then finally breaks through to win it. She shows how NY was split between the Dodgers, Giants and Yankees. Great book, written by one of the top writers ever.
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