Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman's Quest to Become a Mother

Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman's Quest to Become a Mother

by Peggy Orenstein
4.5 36

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Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman's Qu 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
Franne More than 1 year ago
I didn't get married until I was forty. Mother nature is not your friend at that age. It's sad that, by the time you are truly emotionally and financially ready to have children your body is way past wanting to cooperate. I could see myself in Peggy, driven, accomplishing what you set out to do. Not being able to have a child was hard. Once trying to have a baby became another "job" that's when I decided to surrender. If we had a child, or not, I was ready to accept that. I look at my husband and see a great guy who would have been a wonderful dad. But, Steven got it right...you have to enjoy what you do have.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Waiting for Daisy is that rare extraordinary book that takes up an immediate and permanent spot in your heart. This is a book that may possibly change your life. The framework for this amazing story is one woman¿s articulate narration of an infertility ordeal. From the decision to have a child through difficulty in conception, from the grinding trial of the infertility industry to the agony of frustrated efforts, Peggy paints an emotional portrait of what so many women endure. Her sympathetic sharing of her own struggle is an outstanding addition to this field of literature and makes Daisy worth reading for anyone, but for any member of the reluctant sisterhood of infertility, it should be considered required reading. But where most infertility books begin and end with what is unquestionably a consuming drama, Peggy goes beyond and explores topics which enrich the story immeasurably. Her bout with cancer, the saga of the survivors of Hiroshima, the choices of women in a modern professional society: these topics and others are explored with insight and empathy and contribute to the recurring theme of her infertility in an unexpected but rewarding way. Perhaps the most surprising but ultimately resonant thread is Peggy¿s emphasis on her relationship with her husband. Her interactions with him, and the effects of her actions and choices on their mutual relationship, are given equal weight with her attempts to deal with her fertility issues. The book somehow becomes as much a story of faith in each other, of the miracle of unshakeable love between a man and a woman, of making mistakes, of honesty, and of repentance and forgiveness. Her unflinching analysis of how her relationship weathered the storm makes Daisy as much a manual on marriage as it is on motherhood. This book will win your heart. Peggy¿s style, which is so personal and real that you almost imagine her sitting with you as you read her words, draws you in and captivates you from the first page. You will laugh and cry and most of all you will be enlightened and inspired in so many ways. And when you are done, you will tell everyone you know to read it too.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is nothing short of a stunning tour de force! At first I thought, why would I read a book about a woman's battle with infertility?? I don't have children and am not trying to get pregnant right now. And noone I know is suffering through this kind of harrowing ordeal. But I read Peggy's last book, Flux and absolutely loved it. I made my bookclub read it and raved about it to everyone I knew. So when I heard 'Waiting For Daisy' was coming out, I thought, why not? And what I discovered surprised me deeply. This book is not just about Peggy's excruciating experiences trying to become a Mother. It's also a profoundly intimate portrait of her marriage and the kind of love that transcends grief, loss and disappointment. At times, her searing portrayal of the toll that her quest for a child takes on her marriage is so intensely personal that I feel as if I am literally sitting at her kitchen table as the events unfold. She spares nothing and shows their shared joy at the first pregnancy and the profound disppointment at the subsequent miscarriage and successive harrowing attempts at fertility treatment. Through it all, she paints her husband Steven in such a fully multidimentional way that I feel as if I've known him for years. And above all I come to see the love they have for each other and the way that that loves sustains in spite of the anger, tears, frustration and longing. As a single woman, witnessing that kind of loyalty and steadfastness in this day and age of 50% divorce rates is profoundly reassuring. It may sound cliched, but her writing is truly transcendent. I didn't think it was possible to laugh and cry at the same time. Peggy has the phenomenal ability to convey heartbreak with wit and humour, and laces in truly hysterical vignettes with bittersweet moments. And all with absolutely no trace of maudlin or sappy prose. And through it all, the book is a veritable nailbiter that you can't put down. It's probably the first book I've ever been truly tempted to turn to the end to find out exactly how it turns out! I strongly recommend this book to everyone woman or man who's ever wanted to see what a truly incredible marriage looks like and how you can survive just about anything if you have love on your side.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am in the throws of infertility treatment, and this book was a tremendous help to me. Even though I have been open with my friends and family about what I'm going through (I've just completed injections and am moving onto IVF), and even though they have been sympathetic, I have often felt as though no one can truly understand how painful, draining, and frustrating this process has been for me and my husband. Waiting for Daisy captured many of these emotions perfectly for me, and managed to somehow insert a little spot-on humor into the whole situation that, for the first time, helped me to laugh at the absurd nature of everything I've had to endure. At one point Peggy Orenstein writes about the Clomid spiral, comparing it to cautionary tales of drug addiction -- first you pop a little Clomid, then next thing you know you're taking out a second mortgage on your home to pay for IVF. I laughed out loud at this passage. Just last year I took my first Clomid, thinking that I'd immediately get pregnant. Just yesterday I was calculating whether I should consider a home equity loan for IVF. Likewise, when the author describes how she didn't buy clothes for 3 years because she kept expecting to get pregnant, I was moved by how this little detail sums up the experiencing of being in a holding pattern for years because you know that your life will change at any moment once you get pregnant. For example, I didn't take a 'real' vacation for a year and a half, always expecting to need my vacation time to tack onto my maternity leave. Other passages have moved me to tears, since the author gives voice to the pain I am experiencing the roller coaster of periods coming, of trying to maintain some amount of hope when all I have felt is despair, and of trying to protect my marriage throughout the entire process. Please read this book if you are going through infertility treatments, know someone who is, or even if you just want to read an authentic, beautiful story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! It has the perfect balance of detail and storyline. In many ways, it goes through a lot of the emotional issues my husband and I have been working through with our infertility.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is very readable, and the author does tell a good story. My only problem with the book is that she is so ambivalent about wanting a child throughout most of the book, you are left wondering where her struggle is coming from. Worth reading, but not that inspiring.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I hate reading technical books on infertility. I like to read real stories about it and how people dealt with it. This book did just that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this book could have been written just for me! I liked the humor, it read quickly, and had heart. Finally a book I wanted to pass on to a friend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Peggy Orenstein does a brilliant job of bringing highs, lows, and humor to the hard path of infertility. Bravo.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My twins arrived after 2.5 years of infertility, countless tests, injections, and ridiculous suggestions from people trying to be "helpful"..."Just relax, it'll happen", ect. I felt cut off from lifelong friends and family members who could conceive so easily. Thankfully, I found a wonderful group of infertiles to suffer through with me. I wish I'd had this book ten years ago as well! It is painfully honest and while I'm a decade removed from my own struggle, I could still feel the author's pain. I highly recommend to anyone fighting the fight...if you have ever fought infertility and felt that you were alone, you should read this book. Again, I wish it'd been around ten years ago.
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tee111 More than 1 year ago
I usually don't write many reviews, but this was a special story. I recommend it not only for anyone dealing with fertility issues, but really for anyone contemplating becoming a mom (or dad) - it is a wonderful book and will make you laugh and cry and actually bite your nails at the end. Thank you Ms Orenstein!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I cannot say enough good things about this book. As someone going through the frustrating early phase of 'fertility issues', i truly felt like someone understood where I am right now and came out on the other side of it. I would recommend this book to anyone tackling their own fertility journey--or supporting someone who is going through difficult times trying to conceive. It's an engrossing read that I could not put down. Peggy Orenstein's candor combined with her amazing strength make for a truly incredible book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This had to have been a tough book to write. It's so honest and moving. It's rare I find a book that I literally can't put down. This is one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Peggy Orenstein's portrayal of a quest for a child in 'Waiting for Daisy' is candid and humorous. I enjoyed every chapter of this thought-provoking book. Orenstein's honest eloquence in expressing her feelings throughout her incredible journey moved me so much. Time and time again, I found myself thinking, 'I thought I was the only one who felt that way!' Whether you have ever been through any of Ms. Orenstein's challenges: cancer, infertility, IVF treatments, and adoption attempts, or whether you have simply felt somewhat ambivalent about parenthood.... this book is for you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I highly recommend that anyone experiencing fertility challenges read this book. After you do, come back and read this review. While this book is beautifully written, entertaining at times and extremely moving, I did not feel inspired to follow in the author¿s footsteps. As someone who is in the midst of infertility, I seek hope at every corner. The author¿s quest to conceive a biological child had many significant costs. While she inevitably succeeds in giving birth to her daughter, Daisy, I wonder how she would feel about her quest now, had she not been so lucky. To what lengths would she have sacrificed her health, her marriage, and even her own sanity to achieve her goal? At what point do you say your own life is worth something, that it should be preserved, nourished, and celebrated to the utmost so that when the time is right to receive a child you can offer him or her the unconditional love he or she deserves? If ¿getting a baby¿ means risking your health, your marriage, and ultimately your happiness, what hope do we have for showing children how to love themselves? While I can relate to the issues the author experienced on her journey time and time again, this book was the final straw that allowed me to redirect my own fertility journey on a path filled with greater love for myself, my husband and my own cherished life. Please also see my review for Julia Indichova's Inconceivable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Peggy Orienstein really opened up her life to share with her readers. The book was touching, inspiring, interesting and worth the read. Add this to your reading list for the spring or summer!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found Waiting for Daisy a courageous and honest account of how infertility can turn into a obsessive spiral, blinding people from some of the most dear things in life. Having struggled with infertility, I could relate to many of Peggy's experiences. But I could have never described them so eloquently or honestly, and with humor¿I would have rather dug a hole and never come out. I'm grateful to her for her openness and for willing to be vulnerable. I shed many, many tears throughout the book, which was hard to put down each night. Highly, highly recommended!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This Book Was Very Seductive It Was Interesting I Read It As A Biograghy For A School Project And We Had To Dress Up Like The Author And The Class Enjoyed My Acting.This Book Was Helpful In My Ways!
Guest More than 1 year ago
A few years ago I read her amazing book Flux and it completely resonated. So when I learned that `Waiting for Daisy¿ was about Peggy¿s struggle with infertility and that she¿d been through breast cancer, I couldn¿t wait to read it, as I too, have been through both by the age of 43. I find her writing is eloquent and will take you through the gamut of emotions. There was a sentence in her book that reminded me of the famous quote by author Rilke (try to love the questions themselves¿). Peggy said that she is ¿learning to love the question marks and recognize that closure doesn¿t always occur.¿ After going through infertility and breast cancer, you learn that you can¿t control many outcomes and some of us will never have an answer for why we had to go through such adversity. We can only learn how to keep moving forward with courage and gratitude for the lessons. Thank you Peggy for having the courage to share yourself and your story with us.