A Walk on the Beach: Tales of Wisdom from an Unconventional Woman

A Walk on the Beach: Tales of Wisdom from an Unconventional Woman

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A Walk on the Beach: Tales of Wisdom from an Unconventional Woman 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Scrambling along rocks on a Cape Cod beach, following the sound of a foghorn, Joan Anderson suddenly finds herself almost nose-to-nose with an old woman she doesn't know. The stranger turns out to be Joan Erikson, wife of psychoanalyst Erik Erikson. Feeling an immediate connnection, the two Joans rapidly become close companions. Joan Anderson has come to the Cape, running away from home, to re-evaluate her marriage and the direction of her life. Always a people-pleaser, she now feels exhausted and confused, no longer fulfilled by family or her career as the author of children's books. Seeking a small town nursing home where her husband will receive attentive care during his final days, Joan Erikson has relocated to the same town. Her running-awy came years ago when she went, a young girl alone, to Europe to dance with Isadora Duncan, at a time when such things simply weren't done. Anderson's book is the account of the two women's blossoming friendship and the lessons they learn from one another. She recounts a multitude of conversations which took place as they go about their daily activities, walking the beaches, weaving cloth to represent the stages of their lives, sharing meals and ideas. Erikson urges Anderson to make time for play in her life each day, to get out of her head and into her body. Now in her nineties, she demonstrates the benefits of keeping one's body machinery well-functioning. The friendship reinvigorates her and she excitedly begins to rework and build on the pioneering work on life stages she shared with her husband. Meanwhile Anderson grows in confidence and clarity of purpose to the point that she can hike the Inca trail to Machu Picchu, a feat that would have been impossible for her before. She walks back into her marriage but as a changed person, more independent, more aware of who she is and the person she wants to become. Erikson quotes a Japanese scholar: In order not to fail in the end, you have to be dependent on yourself, and know that you can handle things, and most importantly, bring a little humor into the despair. Lightness, imagination, flexibility-these are the things that go into making a new start. And so, make a new start they do, each growing from the other, becoming stronger and more vibrant in the process.
Guest More than 1 year ago
All my friends have read it and love it. For the true woman artist,mother,career woman & world explorer, a must read for every woman. Reminded me of Anne Morrow Lindberg's A Gift by the Sea only better!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
DoranneLongPTMS More than 1 year ago
I love reading Joan's earlier books, A Year by the Sea, and An Unfinished Marriage. I read them frequently to remind me of the wisdom shared. This book is good as well; sharing many wonderful insights. My favorite: "So,I advise you to take care of yourself and let yourself grow old." We are never to old to savor life and learn something new. Thanks for the reminder and the challenge!
MaryL-Ohio More than 1 year ago
Joan Anderson is a brilliant writer. She captivates you from you the start and holds you throughout the book. Her messages are simply if you can look at yourself honestly. As you read her books, you will feel as though she knows you and you her for years. She is an amazing woman and in person even more amazing. Read them all you owe it to yourself.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
In the interest of full disclosure, I am a 59 year old man (so everyone who thinks this book is worth reading can stop reading my review right here); married for thirty-eight years - my wife and I have separate, common, and joint interests. But the author hasn't learned much from her mentor, Joan Ericson, who obviously gets it. With unintended irony, the author carefully describes Joan's attendance at the death of her husband. Elsewhere in the book, she notes (as she practically flees her home, where her recently retired but loving husband now lives) to go to her 'office' - a room in Joan's house she has chosen to work because her husband isn't in the building. As she is heading out, she thinks that 'reigniting' a marriage is hard work. By the end of this story, the author has apparently discovered herself, but her husband has practically disappeared. But then he is obviously superflous to this story and to her life. One wonders why they ever married in the first place. Don't waste your time with this drivel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Joan Anderson has captured the beauty and wisdom of Joan Erickson. I kept thinking that this book compares with Anne Morrow Lindberg's Gifts from the Sea. Keep this book by your bedside table to reread for moments of confusion. It is a special book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Joan was blessed with an amazing relationship with a wonderful woman. I admire her Ms. Andersons ability to, poignantly, put into words such a life changing experience. I look forward to her other books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book by Joan Anderson. I have read her first two books about her experiences and think this evolution into a vision beyond just her situation is wonderful. Of course Joan Erikson's journey and wisdom stimulated so much thought. However this is about taking that wisdom and making it your own just as we, the readers, must do with anything we read. Thanks Joan for another great book. Anne S.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Joan Anderson's keen ability to absorb and poignantly share her mentor, Joan Erickson's 'life lines' is a glorious gift to the reader. Through her writing, the author is truly a 'people changer', an inspiration...it is encouraging to know that it is a good thing to be 'unfinished.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Walk on the Beach is the perfect following to Joans Year by the Sea and Unfinished Marriage. It pulls many things from the first two together and and seems a fitting sequal and conclusion (in a sense) after the others. In Year by the Sea you come to see and deal with yourself, in Unfinished Marriage with your significant other and now the richness of a wonderful sharing friendship. Joan has again struck a chord and I will share this book with friends as I have with the first two books. I look forward to my 2nd Weekend by the Sea retreat in 3 weeks and hearing Joan talk about this book more.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I waited eagerly for the release of A Walk On The Beach, and was rewarded with another beautifully written book by Joan Anderson. Joan has a way of connecting with her readers as if they were sitting across from her, talking like old friends. I highly recommend A Walk On The Beach.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anderson's latest literary work is one of her best to date. Full of imagery, humor, and wisdom, A Walk on the Beach will touch your senses and awaken your true self in ways you thought might not happen. As her mentor, Joan Erikson reminded the author, the importance of continuing to learn, grow, change and play as one ages, as well as to be surprised by life and where it leads are the keys to a fulfilling and enriching life. Not just for women, it is a book for all who struggle at times with thoughts and feelings of purpose and significance.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The theme of Joan Anderson's books about being an 'unfinished women,' carries over to A Walk on the Beach, her third book about her year by sea on Cape Cod. Joan Anderson shares the wisdom of her friend, Joan Erikson, inspiring all that read this book. The message tells us to identify what we want. Also,the necessity to find purpose in our lives. And as we age, to be in a position where we have a sense of things not ending, but freshly beginning. This book is a beautiful read about friendship, and mentoring by someone who tells you what the matter is. Then inspires you to reach beyond your self-imposed limits to risk breaking out of the mold. I loved the way Joan let the reader peek into her relationship with the person that made such a difference in her life. I'm buying it for my friends of all ages. I loved this gem of a book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An easy read yet full of great insights. It was almost like the reader could become the third friend. I was reminded of several key friendships with other strong women that I have had in my life. One review I read mentioned that married women would like it. I am not married and yet found it an outstanding book to read. It continues to enforce the idea that when a woman takes the time to connect to nature and themselves it increases the value of what they offer to others in their lives.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a former manager of an independent bookstore, Joan Anderson's books, especially Year by the Sea practically jumped into our customer's arms. We sold thousands of copies of her books and Joan's readers were not disappointed. Some of our customer's attended her Weekend by the Sea (including myself) and returned changed for the better. I had my highlighter ready and used it generously while reading A Walk on the Beach. The friendship between Joan Anderson (age 50) and Joan Erickson (age 90) is powerful, exciting, magical, invigorating, and there is much wisdom imparted. It's hard to believe Joan Erickson is 90. She has such a zest for life which hasn't diminished just because she's old. She enjoys each day, has fun and is playful and most importantly she believes in sharing what you know. Like A Year by the Sea, A Walk on the Beach can be read and then reread. You'll always learn something new. This book belongs on every woman's bookshelf.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I LOVED A Walk on the Beach. The friendship between Joan Anderson and Joan Erickson is magical. I was amazed at the energy, vitality and zest for life 90 year old Joan Erickson had and shared with Joan Anderson. I was underlining on almost every page. Great words of wisdom, thoughts on life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have thoroughly enjoyed all 3 of Joan Anderson's books sharing her 'intimate and life altering' experiences by living alone for a year, her ongoing challenges in keeping her marriage alive, and the chance meeting of a great friend and mentor in Joan Erikson. Joan Anderson not only is a talented writer, but also one can only admire the courage it took to write down intimate details of her closest relationships. A Walk on the Beach has impacted myself on the importance of 'keeping life alive' every day.