Walk Through Darkness

Walk Through Darkness

by David Anthony Durham
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Hardcover(LARGEPRINT)

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Overview

Walk Through Darkness by David Anthony Durham

When he learns that his pregnant wife has been spirited off to a distant city, William responds as any man might—he drops everything to pursue her. But as a fugitive slave in Antebellum America, he must run a terrifying gauntlet, eluding the many who would re-enslave him while learning to trust the few who dare to aid him on his quest.
Among those hunting William is Morrison, a Scot who as a young man fled the miseries of his homeland only to discover even more brutal realities in the New World. Bearing many scars, including the loss of his beloved brother, Morrison tracks William for reasons of his own, a personal agenda rooted in tragic events that have haunted him for decades.
Following up on his award-winning debut, Gabriel’s Story, David Anthony Durham presents another riveting tale, a brilliantly drawn portrait of America before the Civil War, and a provocative meditation on racial identity, freedom and equality.

Author Biography:

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781587242427
Publisher: Cengage Gale
Publication date: 07/02/2002
Edition description: LARGEPRINT

About the Author

David Anthony Durham earned an M.F.A from the University of Maryland. His first novel, Gabriel’s Story, was published to wide acclaim in 2001. He has won several awards, including the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Fiction Award, a First Novel Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association, and a Legacy Award. His short fiction appears in Gumbo: An Anthology of African American Writing. Durham lives with his wife and two children in rural Scotland.

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Walk Through Darkness 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Walk Through Darkness is an outstanding novel. I read it before the New York Times Review, but in reading that it got me thinking about the book even more. Not only is the story itself engaging and action packed and the writing superbly poetic... But also I agree with the notion that the author has 'formed his own inclusive and original version of American society, nourished by a nuanced understanding of history and an intuitive, almost spooky feel for the inner lives of its inhabitants'. That's exactly on the money, although I wouldn't have found the words to put it that way myself. Great book. And it's specifically NOT like other novels dealing with slavery. This is not Roots you all, but something very different.
token787 More than 1 year ago
Anthony Durham writes a beautiful novel called Walk Through Darkness, it's a slave trying to desperately seek out his pregnant love that was taken to another state. Unbehold, there's also a slave tracker that's on his trail that desperately wants to nab Lewis before others do. This novel not only show u how back in times slavery was, but it tells a story of courage, desperation,family, and true love. The characters were described & entailed that the reader feel every aspect of emotion from the beginning of the novel until the last tears you wipe away. Anthony Durham this was a wonderful story told and hope to read more by u in this genre.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Walk Through Darkness is an outstanding novel. I read it before the New York Times Review, but in reading that it got me thinking about the book even more. Not only is the story itself engaging and action packed and the writing superbly poetic... But also I agree with the notion that the author has 'formed his own inclusive and original version of American society, nourished by a nuanced understanding of history and an intuitive, almost spooky feel for the inner lives of its inhabitants'. That's exactly on the money, although I wouldn't have found the words to put it that way myself. Great book. And it's specifically NOT like other novels dealing with slavery. This is not Roots you all, but something very different.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I finished this book in tears. Absolute tears. And that¿s no mean feat because I¿m normally a skeptic. I¿ve no love of sappy movies or melodramatic novels, and this is nothing like either of those. But it is about the triumph of the best parts of us. Make no mistake about it - there are brutal aspects of this book. The author sees the times with a close up, personal reality that brings the horrors home as few novels ever have (Beloved being one notable exception). But still it somehow builds with trial upon trial into a conclusion that is totally satisfying and credible and hopeful. This is a novel of many births, many quiet moments, much hope that only comes out of putting the characters through hell and seeing them fight their way out of it. I couldn¿t recommend it more: for men who love women, men who are fathers or will be, women who love men, women who¿ve given birth to children and who understand all the fears and hopes we have for our babies.