Walking in This World

Walking in This World

by Julia Cameron
4.4 7

NOOK Book(eBook)

$9.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Walking in This World: The Practical Art of Creativity 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book so long ago but still reference it often. This book explains how to live with many universal feelings and experiences of being a writer/artist. Cameron's writing has helped me make crucial decisions, bolstered me when motivation waned, taught me that insecurity comes with the territory, shown me to contain my work until it's ready to withstand critiques, when group support is not supportive, and how to set boundaries to improve productivity. I'm grateful to Cameron's generosity in teaching many things I didn't have to stumble over myself until I figured them out. The struggle to become your best artist-self can be difficult, if not heart-breaking, in a society that often does not honor its artists with sensitivity or an income. Yea, Julia. You've save me from drowning in confusion many times. If I had one book on my shelf to guide my work, this would be it.
Richard_Szponder More than 1 year ago
Walking In This World, the second in The Artist's Way Trilogy by creativity prophet Julia Cameron, brings more of her signature inspiration and activities focused on unblocking artists of all mediums: painters, writers, sculptors, musicians, and actors. Based in Cameron's philosophy that creativity is a divine and spiritual practice, the practitioner of the techniques in Walking In This World begins to see how creativity is inherent and healing. Humans, if created in the image of God (referred to by Cameron as The Great Creator), are obligated themselves to tap into a higher consciousness and bring about their own creations in service of others. While The Artist's Way is strongly tailored toward beginners, those whose desires to be creative have somehow eluded them perhaps for years, this second installment assumes that the reader has achieved some level of creative practice. Although the artist has most likely not made a career of his or her art at this point, anyone attempting these exercises should be somewhat established in their own practice of their form of art. Cameron presents essays and exercises dealing with expanding creative horizons, identifying your own identity, evaluating your origins as an artist, and finding ways to use emotions such as anger as fuel for driving your creativity forward. Taking a bolder, more direct approach in Walking In This World, Cameron deals plainly and bluntly with those individuals the artist may encounter along the way who will attempt to latch onto the budding artist, may not understand the creative personality, or may even attempt to sabotage certain creative endeavors. While still uplifting and motivational, Walking In This World explores the darker side of a life within the arts. Additionally, Cameron tackles topics of creative exhaustion, road blocks along the way, and how to experience resiliency from such negative experiences as worry, fear, restlessness, insecurity, self-pity, and doubt of one's own abilities. These essays are particularly powerful, and the tasks that accompany the essays are groundbreaking in their assistance in dealing with these difficult times. Cameron is committed to her idea that creativity and art is a community event, and as was the case in The Artist's Way, she makes sound recommendations as to the types of people to both seek out and avoid when making a commitment to creativity. She refers to these people as "before, during, and after friends," and she explains how to balance receiving support while at the same time giving support to other budding artists whether they be in need of encouragement, praise, or a reality check. In Walking In This World, Cameron daringly touches upon topics that could easily fall into the realm of the metaphysical. Those uncomfortable with teachings of higher consciousness, God, angels, psychics, and spirit guides may have some difficult accepting Cameron's premises. While not so direct in her explanation of these concepts and their influence on art, anyone familiar with the metaphysical sciences will recognize those elements here.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago