The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic

The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic

by Allan Wolf

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780763663315
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Publication date: 03/26/2013
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 480
Sales rank: 206,164
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.40(d)
Lexile: 750L (what's this?)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Allan Wolf, an expert poet and storyteller, is the author of the award-winning novels NEW FOUND LAND:LEWIS AND CLARK’S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY and ZANE’S TRACE. He lives in Asheville, North Carolina.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

A masterpiece. Wolf leaves no emotion unplumbed, no area of research uninvestigated, and his voices are so authentic they hurt. Everyone should read it.
—Booklist

Wolf constructs a richly textured novel in verse that recreates the Titanic's ill-fated journey, predominantly through the voices of her passengers... Wolf's carefully crafted characters evolve as the voyage slides to its icy conclusion; readers may be surprised by the potency of the final impact.
—Publishers Weekly

Twenty-four voices-of passengers, rats and even the iceberg-evoke the human tragedy of the ill-fated voyage. Wolf brings the history and, more importantly, the human scale of the event to life by giving voice to the players themselves . . . A lyrical, monumental work of fact and imagination that reads like an oral history revved up by the drama of the event.
—Kirkus Reviews

Wolf's novel in verse gives voice, through first-person accounts, to a cross section of passengers and crew on the Titanic: how they boarded, why they're there, and how they face the disaster. . . . The themes of natural disaster, technology, social class, survival, and death all play out here.
—The Horn Book

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The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
StalkinTheBooks More than 1 year ago
The Watch That Ends the Night is a moving piece of historical fiction told in verse, with over 20 POVs. Its a haunting, often foreshadowing look at the lives of those aboard the Titanic in the days leading up to and directly following its tragic sinking. Before the start of Titanic's maiden voyage we are introduced to a massive amount of characters from all different economic and social backgrounds. With so many POVs it can be a bit confusing at first remembering who is who, especially with the crew. Thankfully most of the characters have a very particular way of talking and their own unique backstory helping to distinguish them from one another. Its hard to narrow down which characters stood out the most (Captain E.J. Smith and Margaret Brown are obvious choices) but I actually found myself connecting more with some of the lesser know passengers such as Jamila (a Lebanese refugee) and Olaus (a Norwegian immigrant). The pacing of this novel is a tricky thing because I found myself completely invested in the characters and story right from the start, how could I not be, but then it started to drag in the middle. While I wish the pace could have remained the same, I understood the need for the slower, quieter moments. The normalcy of day to day life aboard the ship made everything feel all the more real, since none of the passengers anticipated what was to come next. When Titanic collides with the iceberg the slow pace is gone in seconds and you will find it completely impossible to put the book down until you've learned the fate of all the characters on board. To say this novel is overwhelming at times would be a huge understatement. The chaos is tangible and electric making the reader feel angry and helpless. I cried while reading it and my heart broke for the crew who tried to help knowing there wasn't much they could do. For the third class passengers who couldn't speak English and didn't fully understand what was going on. For the people who were left on the ship as it sank knowing there was no where to go and for the families that were torn apart never to be reunited. The research and facts author Allan Wolf shares at the end of the novel are just as remarkable as the novel itself. 20+ pages of notes help shed light on how much of the story is fact versus fiction as well as the actually life stories of those that lived through and died in the disaster. If you're a fan of verse, historical fiction or the Titanic then this novel is a must read. If you're not, then I would still encourage you to give it a chance since I've never read a book quite like it nor do I predict that I will again. Obviously this novel left quite an impression on me, one that can best be summed up in this harrowing line written by one of the survivors. "My tears fall when I think about it, because I saw what I will never forget as long as I live."
scuzzy on LibraryThing 23 days ago
There is no bigger story than that of the Titanic. This year marked the 100 year anniversary of its sinking and in that century there have been many tales, true and fiction depicting that fateful sailing.This book is a blend of fact and fiction and makes that clear, however it is written so well that one could be forgiven for believing its authenticity. This is not a story designed to dispel or create new myths, this is no a reference to be used for 'Titaniacs', this is not a blatant means to cash in on one of history's greatest triumphs, and failures. Introducing a cast made up of (mostly) actual passengers it narrates their path of fate and experiences prior to, during, and after the voyage of Titanic and done so well you feel yourself choosing favourites and dismissing others. Even the iceberg itself is a major character in this book and shows a matyr-ish and dark side to nature vs. human. It took barely four days to complete this 400+ page book, and considering that coincided with a weekend full of rugby, hockey and babysitting while a wife was laid up with the flu could be taken as testament to the enjoyment of the book. Even the notes section at the end of the book was a fascinating read in itself with facts and figures over the complement and fascinating statistics.If I had to draw any criticism for the book (which in a way is also a plus) it is the method of both writing and printing on the pages...I guess Wolf was trying to capture the period in the way he wrote in short stanzas and paragraphs, however at times rhyming prose was used sparingly, but it made me read following chapters 'looking' for the poem which didn't exist. I may not have explained this all that well, but if you read it, and you should, you will understand what I mean.Great book.
dgmlrhodes on LibraryThing 23 days ago
This was an Interesting perspective in the Titanic disaster. The book highlights voices of passenger and crew reflecting what was happening in their lives and daily jobs. It then shifted to the disaster and highlighted the voice of the undertaker who is recovering and preparing the bodies.
RosanaSantana on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Just in time for the 100th anniversary of the sinking of Titanic, comes The Watch that Ends the Night. The books follows the days spent on the Titanic from real and fictional people on the ship through poetry. The book is heartfelt although a little too long. There are also interesting facts and data about the ship and the people on it.
lilibrarian on LibraryThing 23 days ago
A verse telling of the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. Different passengers, the iceberg and the ship rat all have distinct voices. Includes historic notes and statistics about the passengers, both survivors and killed.
Joles on LibraryThing 23 days ago
This book is my top pick for a must read! While I am a fan of the Titanic I would not nearly qualify as a Titaniac. Even so, I thoroughly enjoyed the way this book uses verse/stream of consciousness in the writing. It was easy to get through because the conversations/thoughts are like one page stories. It is clear that there was much thought and research put into this historical fiction about what transpired on the ship without getting too technical. It is an easy introduction of what the various classes and crew experienced and includes anecdotes that were fresh. I appreciate the facts at the end of the book, including the histories of the various voices we experience and that the author admits to what was fiction. I cannot recommend this book highly enough!!!
ShaEliPar on LibraryThing 23 days ago
The Watch That Ends the Night is a moving peace of historical fiction told in verse, with over 20 POVs. Its a haunting, often foreshadowing look at the lives of those aboard the Titanic in the days leading up to and directly following its tragic sinking.Before the start of Titanic's maiden voyage we are introduced to a massive amount of characters from all different economic and social backgrounds. With so many POVs it can be a bit confusing at first remembering who is who, especially with the crew. Thankfully most of the characters have a very particular way of talking and their own unique backstory helping to distinguish them from one another. Its hard to narrow down which characters stood out the most (Captain E.J. Smith and Margaret Brown are obvious choices) but I actually found myself connecting more with some of the lesser know passengers such as Jamila (a Lebanese refugee) and Olaus (a Norwegian immigrant). The iceberg itself and John Snow (the undertaker) both provide an eerie voice of patience when there's nothing to do for either one but wait.The pacing of this novel is a tricky thing because I found myself completely invested in the characters and story right from the start, how could I not be, but then it started to drag in the middle. While I wish the pace could have remained the same, I understood the need for the slower, quieter moments. The normalcy of day to day life aboard the ship made everything feel all the more real, since none of the passengers anticipated what was to come next. When Titanic collides with the iceberg the slow pace is gone in seconds and you will find it completely impossible to put the book down until you've learned the fate of all the characters on board.To say this novel is overwhelming at times would be a huge understatement since I literally cried while reading it. My heart broke for the crew who tried to help knowing there wasn't much they could do. For the third class passengers who couldn't speak English and didn't fully understand what was going on. For the people who were left on the ship as it sank knowing there was no where to go and for the families that were torn apart never to be reunited.The research and facts author Allan Wolf shares at the end of the novel are just as remarkable as the novel itself. 20+ pages of notes help shed light on how much of the story is fact versus fiction as well as the actually life stories of those that lived through and died in the disaster. If you're a fan of verse, historical fiction or the Titanic then this novel is a must read. If you're not, then I would still encourage you to give it a try since I've never read a book quite like it nor do I predict that I will again. If nothing else I will leave you with this harrowing line which sum up my feeling for the book. It was written by an actual survivor in a letter to family after being rescued. "My tears fall when I think about it, because I saw what I will never forget as long as I live."
santli on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Wow. I love historical novels but hadn't previously read any having to do with the Titanic. I love poetry, but really haven't gotten into verse novels or poetry written by Allan Wolf. I'm so glad I picked up The Watch That Ends the Night as my foray into the world of both the Titanic and verse novels. Written from the perspective of 20 different passengers on the ill-fated ship, and told over the course of approximately three weeks, you really become immersed in the lives of the passengers. What's perhaps most impressive, is that Wolf is able to pique and hold your interest in a plot where you already know the ending. After reading, I felt like I had more sympathy for captian E.J. Smith; more understanding of what it was like to be a foreign immigrant in third class like Jamila and her brother Elias; what the perspectives of specific crew members were that tried to save others and later themselves. Furthermore, the ample notes, facts and bibliography that Wolf provides at the end are impressive, adding weight to an "embellished" historical event.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago