×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

We Want You to Know: Kids Talk About Bullying
     

We Want You to Know: Kids Talk About Bullying

by Deborah Ellis
 

See All Formats & Editions

Through her association with a community anti-bullying campaign launched in Haldimand, Norfolk, and neighboring communities in Southern Ontario, children's author Deborah Ellis asked students from the ages of nine to nineteen to talk about their experiences with bullying. The results are thoughtful, candid, and often harrowing accounts of "business as usual" in and

Overview

Through her association with a community anti-bullying campaign launched in Haldimand, Norfolk, and neighboring communities in Southern Ontario, children's author Deborah Ellis asked students from the ages of nine to nineteen to talk about their experiences with bullying. The results are thoughtful, candid, and often harrowing accounts of "business as usual" in and around today's schools. The kids in this book raise questions about the way parents, teachers and school administrators cope with bullies. They talk about which methods have helped and which ones, with the best of intentions, have failed to protect them. And some kids reveal how they have been able to overcome their fear and anger to become strong advocates for the rights of others.

This is a book for reading and sharing. Each interview is followed by questions that will encourage open discussion about the nature of bullying and the ways in which individuals and schools could deal more effectively with bullies and their victims. And additional comments from international students reveal how much kids the world over have in common in the way they experience and deal with bullies.

Editorial Reviews

Booklist
"In more than 30 hard-hitting profiles, teens talk about bullying: as victims, perpetrators, and bystanders...Shocking but never sensationalized, this is a great title for group discussion."
What If? Magazine
"Definitely the book to read if you are dealing with a bully. Each chapter offers the opportunity to help you find what you are looking for—a possible solution to your own situation. Even if you're not dealing with bullying, you can open up to any page in the book and find a story that makes you feel and think. Thanks Deborah Ellis for this inspiring book."
Southwest Ohio and Neighboring Librairies
"Should be in every junior high and high school library. This book is effective because the stories are real, and they come straight from the heart of these kids...Sections are designed to open up dialogue between students, teachers, and parents."
Southwest Ohio and Neighboring Libraries
Should be in every junior high and high school library. This book is effective because the stories are real, and they come straight from the heart of these kids...Sections are designed to open up dialogue between students, teachers, and parents.
Children's Literature - Dawna Lisa Buchanan
Here are haunting descriptions of bullying which have often left victims with permanent physical, social and emotional disabilities. Ellis organizes the interviews under five categories: You're not good enough; You're too different; You're itjust because; We want to crush you; and Redemption. Schools are not places of protection for many children. In fact, bullying is almost institutionalized. The children asked for protection repeatedly—from parents, teachers, principals, school boards and even, in some cases, the police. Although cyber bullying is acted upon, many of the physical and verbal abuses suffered in these cases were allowed to continue. Some school personnel were afraid of legal repercussions; sometimes the community was so small that everyone knew one another, which made confrontation difficult. While many parents took action on behalf of their children, they were not always successful. Some were victims themselves. Others, in frustration, acted violently or abusively which further compounded the problem. Several families in this book took their children out of school altogether or moved them. Ellis includes responses from bullies, most of whom are now remorseful, but one concludes her comments with "Who cares? I don't." (page 95) One of the most shocking patterns is that when students continue to be bullied, it is perceived as the victim's problem. "I told the principal on Monday, and she said, "Many times you have lied, Adam, so why should I believe you now?" (page 21) Ellis includes discussion questions at the end of each interview, which could be used to initiate important conversations. Black and white photographs punctuate the text, and resources for parents, kids and teachers are listed at the back, along with the index. Proceeds from the book go to Name It 2 Change It Community Campaign Against Bullying. Reviewer: Dawna Lisa Buchanan
VOYA - C. J. Bott
Ellis's words are minimal as she lets fearful, tortured, powerless, and reclaimed voices speak about their painful experiences. Each chapter begins with a brief introduction followed by personal stories of those who have been bullied, as well as a few who were bullies. These young people believe the school staff did little to help protect them, and the antibullying assemblies and programs did not change the environment. Each section ends with "What Do You Think?" questions, and sidebars highlight statements from kids around the world: Angola, California, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Uganda, and more. This book can be used with all young people and adults, as it deals with a problem that touches all of us and seems to evade solutions. So many emotions rise from these pages that the reader cannot remain untouched. Subaru Yokota from Japan assigns us all a mission to act: "You must embrace courage and have absolute determination that you are going to stop bullying. You can't just see the prey get hunted by the predator. You have to stop it. You have to be heroes.". Reviewer: C. J. Bott
School Library Journal
Gr 4–9—As part of her work with an anti-bullying campaign in her local Canadian community, Ellis interviewed young people between the ages of 9 and 19 about their experiences. In honest, straightforward prose, she shares their stories, many as targets and some as perpetrators or bystanders. The essays are loosely organized around a few themes, such as bullying based on some form of difference, whether real or perceived, and being targeted "just because." The final chapter, "Redemption," highlights those kids who have managed to rise above bullying and find strength. The selections in which students talk about experiencing repeated psychological and/or physical abuse and educators who turn a blind eye to the problems or subversively encourage or participate in the behavior are particularly distressing. Each story is written from the first-person point of view, some with real names and photos, providing an intimacy and immediacy that are critical with these kinds of issues. Readers will find at least one or two stories they can relate to, and educators should be able to use many of the narratives to jumpstart conversation. A good choice for schools stepping up their efforts to address bullying.—Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550504637
Publisher:
Coteau Books
Publication date:
09/01/2011
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
11 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Deborah Ellis is the internationally acclaimed author of more than twenty-five books for children, including the Breadwinner trilogy; The Heaven Shop; I Am a Taxi; Lunch With Lenin; No Safe Place, We Want You to Know: Kids Talk about Bullying, and No Ordinary Day (recently nominated for Governor General Award). A peace activist, feminist, and humanitarian, Deborah has won many national and international awards for her books. Deborah lives in Ontario, Canada.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews