We Were Dancing on a Volcano: Bloodlines and Fault Lines of a Star-Crossed Atlanta Family 1849-1989

We Were Dancing on a Volcano: Bloodlines and Fault Lines of a Star-Crossed Atlanta Family 1849-1989

by Joseph Gatins

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940011100314
Publisher: Joseph Gatins
Publication date: 08/05/2010
Sold by: Smashwords
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 4 MB

About the Author

Joseph Gatins for many years was a reporter and special projects editor with The Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Virginia. He put that experience to good use in researching and writing the non-fiction family biography, We Were Dancing on a Volcano: Bloodlines and Fault Lines of a Star-Crossed Atlanta Family, 1849-1989. Gatins grew up in Paris and Atlanta, and is bilingual in French. He was graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with an undergraduate degree in English and French. He served in Vietnam as a U.S. Army intelligence analyst during 1969-70, and awarded a Bronze Star for that service. He’s now retired to the mountains of north Georgia. Gatins is the first certified organic grower in Rabun County.

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We Were Dancing On A Volcano Bloodlines And Fault Lines Of A Star-Crossed Atlanta Family, 1849-1989 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
( NO) are u not going to punish me my lord i did betray my kind
Dr_Wilson_Trivino More than 1 year ago
In our daily grind of activity we forget of those that were here before us. Especially those of our family, our roots and those nameless people in old vintage black and white photographs that hover on the walls filled with smiling folks. After his father's death, Joseph Gatins found one such photo. One of a one armed man holding a baby. Partly because of his curiosity and because of his journalistic background, Joseph Gatins went on a quest to discover his family's past. What he discovered was one on intrigue, drama, and success. In Atlanta, the Gatins have left a lasting imprint in the Georgian Terrace Hotel which is celebrating its centennial celebration this year. The hotel was constructed by his Great-Grandfather Joseph Francis Gatins, Sr., a successful business man. Weaving the Gatins men through the prongs of history is intriguing look of high society and the outside forces that shaped them. The women were not to be discounted, the author's mother was a Colombian born woman who grew up in France. She was a hit in the burgeoning heart of Dixie. Told in as a historical novel, this book moves quickly as the family grew and evolved. Because the Gatins had the tradition of giving firstborn sons the same first and middle names the dialogue in parts can be a bit confusing. This tale of the Gatins family tree is a rich illustration of a world long gone and how Atlanta history is their own.