The Wednesday Sisters

The Wednesday Sisters

by Meg Waite Clayton
3.9 176

Hardcover(Large Print)

$32.42 $33.95 Save 5% Current price is $32.42, Original price is $33.95. You Save 5%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Wednesday Sisters 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 176 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kath, Frankie, Ally, Brett and Linda are The Wednesday Sisters. They met in a park in CA in the late 1960s and developed a close friendship which spans over 30 years. These 5 women couldn't be more different but soon realize that they share an affinity for literature and share a secret desire to write. I really identified with Frankie. I am from Chicago and grew up in the 70s so I really appreciated all of the references to the Cubs and Northwestern University but more importantly I felt that the author really captured the Midwestern 'mentality' of the era. While reading I couldn't help but be reminded of all of the hardships my mom went through as a young woman in the 60s and 70s. She divorced when I was young and was an outcast at my Catholic Elementary School. I can see why Kath stuck it out! She was not able to go to college for the same reasons as Frankie. There were times when I laughed out loud and had to hold back the tears while reading. Meg Waite Clayton really captured the bond that women have when they develop meaningful relationships and friendships. I can't wait to pass this book on to one of my Wednesday Sisters!
rizzomom More than 1 year ago
This book is the best I've read since Blue July Sky. I'm so into the characters. All five are great in their own way. I think every woman can find a part of herself in each one of the Wednesday Sisters. This is a great book. Every one should read this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you are over 60, graduated high school in 50's, graduated college in the 60's-the story of these friends is the story of your past. From picket fences, broken marriages, miscarriages, the horrors of early treatment of breast cancer, the rallies against Vietnam, the Miss American contest--it is all in this delighful read. I saw myself and friends in this. Just buy it and pass it on to your friends as I will do.
Wacky_J More than 1 year ago
The novel The Wednesday Sisters, while falling quite short of being original, does have its redeeming qualities. I'm sorry, but I'm tired of reading material from writers who only seem to be able to write about becoming writers. Am I alone in this? I know we're all told to "write what we know" but this is getting ridiculous. The characters in this character-driven novel fall flat at times. The stereotypes overwhelm. With the exception of one heart-wrenching scene, they fail to elicit much empathy. Even the ending was telegraphed. The writing style was sometimes simplistic but not without merit. The chronological cultural references were too numerous and too contritely stuffed into the novel to feel at all "real". The upside? The many truly great novels to which the the characters refer inspired me to go back and re-read several of them myself. I only wish the author had been able to capture more than a touch of their greatness.
sjh801 More than 1 year ago
I had happened upon The Wednesday Sisters quite by accident, through a quick mention from an Internet site. I am I glad that I did. The characters and story were well written with a backdrop of the America of the 60s, 70s and beyond. The development of the characters, their relationship with each other and the times, was written with an eye to the many and varied changes America has experienced. Each character was clearly defined both as an individual and as to her place in the "group". Someone once said "Who you are is where you were when". That is true with this novel. Thanks to Meg Waite Clayton for a book that lends itself to book clubs, too. I can't wait to discuss it next year in our Third Thursday Book Club. The two books which I also recommend explore individual women and their unique place in their "group" and times. Enjoy!
suzanne-hall More than 1 year ago
What happens when mothers go to a park with their children? They find other women like themselves who enjoy discussing books that they've read. These 5 women also discovered that they would all like to write and be published. So, that's what they did. They set up a time on Wednesdays when they would meet at the park and critique each other's work. Some did get published & others went to work at a publishing company. It is also historical fiction in the fact that the story started in the 1960's and a time span of 30 afterwards. These women did not work outside the home but felt the need to write, to do something with their lives other than being a mother. The 'sisters' also became best friends supporting each through pregnancy issues, becoming single mothers, cancer,and husband & wives going their seperate ways yet coming back together again. Very much like reality at its best. I read an advanced copy of the books so it had some typos and it missed some words in it, but it was a very good plotline. A very interesting discussion read for book clubs.
Rachel_Villavicencio More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book because the characters really spoke to me. They were strong individuals but also flawed. They were supportive but not pushy. They would be the kind of women that I would like to be friends with.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WHY do authors feel it is necessary to insert breast cancer themes into almost every fricking book?? Enough!! I read to esvape, not suffer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful novel for book groups. The well-written story is about true friendship. I loved how the events of the times are interwoven with the growth of the characters. I fell in love with the characters and the story really made me reflect on how much I am giving to my own friendships. Highly Recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book reminds me of the Billy Joel song 'We Didn't Start the Fire' as it progresses through the lives of these wonderful women from Bobby Kennedy being shot until now. I haven't been so engrossed in a book, as I was with this one, in a long time. This book is a clear example of the power of friendship and how it can endure over the years. I laughed with them and I cried with them and I didn't want the book to end. And when I finished, I emailed all of my best girlfriends just to tell them I love them. This book is a must read for any woman with girlfriends!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure how I feel about this book. It was kind of boring and dragged on. I couldn't get close to the people in this book which may have to do with my age being that this was all before my time. However at times I did enjoy it and it made me laugh or cry a little. I think this book would be good for an older crowd of people in their 50's or 60's because it was more their time frame.
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
A wonderful book filled completely of the relationships between women - the ups and downs. I absolutely fell in love with the group of women and was sort of jealous of their relationships. The men in their lives made an appearance, but the women held the centerpiece Most of the time these books are told from each of their perspectives, but I was absolutely thrilled that it stayed from the perspective of the one character. I think that a sequel could be made and Clayton could take the group through their next phase from another person's voice. Although, I don't tend to enjoy some of the more historical parts of books, I loved how it worked into their lives. They attended rallies and were affected by the history of the times. I really enjoyed this book, it was so easy to get into and I was sad to say goodbye to these women. The women folk would definitely enjoy this book for the relationships and the events that affect their lives.
BooksRFun More than 1 year ago
The reviews on the back of the book sounded so wonderful and the idea of the story sounded good but I was soooooo bored! I gave the book about 100 pages and just couldn't bear to read anymore when I have other books sitting on my shelf! Oh, well!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
By the reviews I thought this would be a great book. It was very boring to me and couldnt even get through it. It was a book club book and everyone else got through it but painfully. They said it didnt pick up until around page 150 but at that point it was good. So I would not recommend it.
noveladdict More than 1 year ago
Great book about female friendships. I loved it. If you have ever wanted to write your own novel, then read this one. Great story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After finishing this book I got on Facebook to track down members of my writing group. Really enjoyed pieces of women's history in this book. A great one for younger women to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I came late to sisterhood. A half-generation younger than the women in The Wednesday Sisters, many in my generation scoffed at unliberated women like them. Many in my generation sought to make their way in a man¿s world, using men¿s strategies¿strategies that felt uncomfortable and often did not serve us well. Yet, at the same time, many of us also became wives and mothers, where we were born again into the realization that the women¿s way¿generosity of spirit and the compassionate, nurturing sisterhood role model¿was the right way all along, the right way for us and for our ailing world. The Wednesday Sisters is the book I wish I had written about sisterhood. It transported me back in time to an earlier world that, at once and the same time, felt like home. I long for Meg Wait Clayton¿s next novel, for the next journey of the soul.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In the late 1960s the five young mothers meet in Palo Alto at a park. They have plenty in common as they dream of being much more than just a wife and mother while hearing tales of the counter culture and the Summer of Love. The quintet love books especially those they can escape into so they can forget their somewhat tedious lives especially the household chores, but each sees a different role for the lead female characters based on what they dream they wanted. --- Linda loves to run with the Olympics her fantasy goal. Brett literally wants to walk on the moon. Kath insists marriage is all she ever desired, but her four new pals with their aspirations make her wonder if there might be something in addition to being wife and mother. Ally, the only one without a child, wants a kid or three. The leader Midwesterner Frankie, who came to California as her husband came here to work at the fledgling computer business, hopes to be come a writer. THE WEDNESDAY SISTERS inspire each other to go after their aspirations and much more even when they seem impossible in a man¿s only world by writing and sharing their tales. --- This historical sisterhood tale is an engaging look at the beginning of the ¿You¿ve come a long way baby¿ feminist movement that brought women into many fields previously taboo epitomized by Hilary¿s run (the next one will go all the way). Each of the five women seems real due to their dreams to be more than identified through their husband and kids. Although their individual writings are too sweet even if they read valid for their place in late 1960s society, fans will enjoy this fine tale as before Sally Ride there was a real Brett out there trying to break out of the box. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go to res three to have real fun my name is lilyith.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ate her ceraal
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting set of friends and the trial and tribulations of being an adult in the 70s. I've even recommended it to my buds.