What Are You Doing Here?: A Black Woman's Life and Liberation in Heavy Metal

What Are You Doing Here?: A Black Woman's Life and Liberation in Heavy Metal

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781935950059
Publisher: Bazillion Points
Publication date: 01/08/2013
Edition description: Original
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author


Laina Dawes is a music and cultural critic and opinion writer from Toronto, Canada. She is an active public speaker and contributor to CBC Radio, current affairs columnist for Afrotoronto.com, and contributing Editor (for race, ethnicity and culture) for Blogher.org.

Skin formed Skunk Anansie in 1994, releasing the albums Paranoid and Sunburnt, Stoosh, Post Orgasmic Chill, Wonderlustre, and Black Traffic. She has provided vocals for albums by Sevendust, Tony Iommi, and a number of soundtracks. Skin is also a DJ, and she currently resides in London.

Table of Contents


“Who Put That Shaven-Headed Black Woman on the Stage?” Foreword by Skin

Introduction, by Laina Dawes

I. Canadian Steel

II. Metal Can Save Your Life (or at Least Your Sanity)

III. I’m Here Because We Started It!

IV. So You Think You’re White?

V. “The Only One” Syndrome

VI. Too Black, Too Metal, and All Woman

VII. The Lingering Stench of Racism in Metal

VIII. Remove the Barricades and Stagedive!

Epilogue

Appendix: “What Are You Doing Here?” — The Survey

Bibliography

Biographies

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

Courageous, honest, and without pretense”—Albert Mudrian, Decibel

"Laina Dawes’ What Are You Doing Here? is a strikingly more powerful, penetrating, and passionate look at metal than the one written by the guy [Tony Iommi] who arguably invented the genre...brave, engaging, and unique"—The Onion A/V Club

"What Are You Doing Here? is essential reading for those who have never felt the blow of intolerance, and for those who have felt it far too often."—PopMatters

“As the title suggests, Dawes has a compellingly idiosyncratic tale to tell about cultural identity and personal passion…[her] understandable difficulty is precisely what makes her struggle interesting.”—The Atlantic

"Dawes has done the metal scene a great service, showing everyone that there’s still a lot of work to do towards making metal truly welcoming to anyone who’s interested in the music. We’re not quite there yet, but What Are You Doing Here? is an excellent start, an important addition to every metal fan’s bookshelf."—MSN.com

“Thoughtful and inspiring”—Publishers Weekly

"Dawes uses her sociological smarts to remind us that metal isn't just disenfranchised white dudes' music—it's a way for all of us on the outside to feel the power."—Revolver (4/5 stars)

"Though focused on metal, these insights are relevant to anyone interested in how racism and sexism can impact any micro-community."—Philadelphia City Paper

"Has the force of a powerful, eloquent typhoon... What Are You Doing Here? is fearless."—Toronto Standard

“The good, the bad, and the ugly sides of being a black woman in the metal and punk scenes.”—Afro-Punk

"Excellent"—About.com

"In her debut book, music journalist and hardcore metal devotee Laina Dawes uncovers black women’s voices and stories of participation in punk and metal."—Vice

"A fantastic book."—AOL Noisecreep

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What Are You Doing Here?: A Black Woman's Life and Liberation in Heavy Metal 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a good book and a great starter for any black women interested in the metal scene
Nicole_Woolent More than 1 year ago
I truly enjoyed this book. There were a few scenarios I could relate to, such as being one of VERY few black women present at a rock show. I can remember being in the mosh pit at a Mindless Self Indulgence show a few years ago, and having a few people stare at me as if I was an alien. I think people need to break away from social stereotypes and embrace the things they enjoy, whether other people accept them or not. I love punk rock, and I'll probably be listening to it when I much older. Some people probably think this means I'm trying to be White, and I'm not. I'm proud to be a Black Woman who listens to rock, and I'm thankful for this book. It has reassured me, I'm not alone.