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What Floats in a Moat?: with audio recording
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What Floats in a Moat?: with audio recording

5.0 2
by Lynne Berry, Matthew Cordell
 

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A goat and a hen turn a playful exploration of physics into scientific fun that rises to the top!

Archie the Goat has a delivery to make. He has several barrels of buttermilk that the queen needs, but in order to get them to her, he needs to cross the moat.

Testing several different theories to find out what will float and what will sink, Archie

Overview

A goat and a hen turn a playful exploration of physics into scientific fun that rises to the top!

Archie the Goat has a delivery to make. He has several barrels of buttermilk that the queen needs, but in order to get them to her, he needs to cross the moat.

Testing several different theories to find out what will float and what will sink, Archie and his friend Skinny the Hen don’t succeed at first, but they do try, try, try again (and again). And with reason and persistence, they’ll get that buttermilk where it needs to be!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Well, a barrel, in this zany scientific fairy tale. The hero is Archimedes, a goat in armor; wearing a long green scarf is Skinny the Hen. In order to deliver barrels of buttermilk to the queen's turreted castle, Archie and Skinny must cross a moat. Despite Skinny's repeated suggestion to "take the drawbridge," Archie's determined to build a boat from a barrel. With much clanging and banging, heaving and shoving, they launch their creation. It sinks. Archie, the mad scientist, tries again, but this time Skinny has to drink off the buttermilk. (Skinny is getting rounder.) With more banging and clanging, the new SS Empty floats, but rolls and tips Archie right into the moat. Can they succeed? Has Archie finally discovered the secret? Eureka!—kids can cheer the newest ship, SS Ballast, as she floats serenely under a blue star-sprinkled sky. Archie and the barrel-shaped queen celebrate, but poor Skinny, who is no longer skinny, looks ready to explode. Teachers or parents can explain or demonstrate Archimedes's discovery (displacement of water) to eager readers—if help is needed, Berry has contributed an Author's Note. Reading aloud, an adult will have fun with Berry's rhymes (goat, moat, boat, float), ] both abrupt and intricate, and many moments of assonance, alliteration, and onomatopoeia. Cordell's witty ink and watercolor illustrations charm with soft colors and woody browns. Some pages contain small, busy sketches, while others display just one painting; spreads are full of drama. The smooth heavy paper has a lovely feel. Archimedes's tale holds allure for young scientists and artists alike. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—In the tradition of classic cartoon-art picture books, this gem tells a fun, slapstick story while teaching the basic physics of buoyancy and Archimedes's principle. Archie the Goat wants to devise a method of crossing the moat to the castle. His friend Skinny the Hen suggests simply taking the drawbridge, but Archie prefers a challenge and sets out to build a contraption to float. The entertaining spot art done with pen-and-ink and watercolor is full of energy and movement, drawing out the humor in the punchy text. Using barrels of buttermilk, Archie tries to make it across the moat. All day and into the night, much puzzling and experimenting results in a dripping goat and a far less skinny hen. Finally, Archie gets it right and floats across to meet a very frustrated porcine queen who wants to know what happened to the rest of her buttermilk. An author's note further explains buoyancy and wonderful barrel endpapers complete the package. This story will liven up any science class and also hold its own as a spirited pleasure read.—Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA
Publishers Weekly
Archie, a goat, and Skinny, a chicken, are trying to reach a castle. The castle has a moat around it, and Skinny suggests the obvious: “We could just take the drawbridge.” Archie, whose knight’s helmet gives him an air of crusading zeal, has bigger plans. “This is a time for science!” he proclaims. Berry (Ducking for Apples) spins her tale with lighthearted, Gilbert and Sullivan–style patter: “ ‘To cross the moat,’ pronounced the goat, ‘we build a contraption to float!’ ” Experimenting with barrels and different quantities of buttermilk—Skinny reluctantly guzzling the excess—the two discover that a full barrel will sink, an empty barrel will roll, but a boat built from a half-empty barrel (the “S.S. Ballast”) will sail. The process of discovery entertains throughout, aided by Cordell’s (Hello! Hello!) loopy ink-and-wash vignettes, which he enlivens with hand-lettered “klunks” and “splashes.” Incidentally, Berry’s exposition of Archimedean discoveries about the displacement of water gives the scientific process of trial-and-error genuine drama. Mostly, though, it’s a highly enjoyable read-aloud whose characters are both eccentric and loveable. Ages 5–9. Agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (July)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442481312
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
07/09/2013
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,069,228
Lexile:
AD400L (what's this?)
File size:
21 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Lynne Berry has published numerous poems in Cricket and Ladybug magazines, and she is the author of the picture books Duck Skates, The Curious Demise of the Contrary Cat, What Floats in a Moat?, and Pig and Pug. Lynne lives in Nashville, Tennessee.
Matthew Cordell’s work has appeared in several books, including Leap Back Home to Me by Lauren Thompson and Itsy-Bitsy Baby Mouse by Michelle Meadows. He lives with his wife outside of Chicago.

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What Floats in a Moat? 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
PAwriter4kids More than 1 year ago
It's hard to write rhyme, and it's hard to write about science. This book does both well AND combines spunky illustrations and a fun story in the complete package. The rhythm and rhyme make this a fun read aloud.
HPSeeker More than 1 year ago
<i><b>WHAT FLOATS IN A MOAT?</b></i>  OK--this book is flat-out funny :) Matthew Cordell's loose, cartoony, comical illustrations match PERFECTLY with Lynne Berry's loose, cartoony, comical story. With dappled bits of rhyme, this book of &quot;science&quot; had me smiling from beginning to end and is sure to make any child giggle--a LOT. LOVE this book!