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What Is There to Say?
     

What Is There to Say?

5.0 1
by Gerry Mulligan
 

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The last of the pianoless quartet albums that Gerry Mulligan recorded in the 1950s is one of the best, featuring the complementary trumpet of Art Farmer, bassist Bill Crow, and drummer Dave Bailey along with the baritonist/leader. This recording is a little skimpy on playing time but

Overview

The last of the pianoless quartet albums that Gerry Mulligan recorded in the 1950s is one of the best, featuring the complementary trumpet of Art Farmer, bassist Bill Crow, and drummer Dave Bailey along with the baritonist/leader. This recording is a little skimpy on playing time but makes every moment count. Virtually every selection is memorable, with "What Is There to Say," "Just in Time," "Festive Minor," "My Funny Valentine," and "Utter Chaos" being the high points. Highly recommended both to Mulligan collectors and to jazz listeners who are just discovering the great baritonist.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/04/2009
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886974927426
catalogNumber:
749274
Rank:
34347

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What Is There to Say? 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
DonnieTheB More than 1 year ago
This album is one the best pieces of jazz history to own. Sometimes it's hard to believe so much sound is coming out of only 4 musicians. It also makes you wonder why Dave Bailey (Drums) and Bill Crow (Bass) aren't more fondly remembered for their tight-swinging drive behind this group. The interaction between Art Farmer and Gerry Mulligan rivals and sometimes exceeds that shown between Chet Baker and Mulligan in the earlier incarnation of Gerry's cool jazz quartet. As to the musicianship of the two horn men, Farmer is more accurate than Baker was and these sessions brought out the best in him. Gerry Mulligan, meanwhile, almost never plays an inappropriate phrase - certainly not on this album. He is in fine form here - the unequalled master of the baritone sax. If you're a Mulligan or Farmer fan - you have to have this one. If you're curious about either artist, I can't think of a better place to start. And if you're a fan of small combo, cool jazz - this is right up your alley. This is one of the easiest, no question about it, 5 star ratings I've given. (Are 6 stars available?) You should also check out "Night Lights". Another version of the hauntingly beautiful "Festive Minor" is heard there.