What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets

What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets

by Michael J. Sandel
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Audiobook(CD - Unabridged)

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Overview

What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets by Michael J. Sandel

Should we pay children to read books or to get good grades? Should we allow corporations to pay for the right to pollute the atmosphere? Is it ethical to pay people to test risky new drugs or to donate their organs? What about hiring mercenaries to fight our wars? Auctioning admission to elite universities? Selling citizenship to immigrants willing to pay?
In What Money Can't Buy, Michael J. Sandel takes on one of the biggest ethical questions of our time: Is there something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale? If so, how can we prevent market values from reaching into spheres of life where they don't belong? What are the moral limits of markets?
In recent decades, market values have crowded out nonmarket norms in almost every aspect of life—medicine, education, government, law, art, sports, even family life and personal relations. Without quite realizing it, Sandel argues, we have drifted from having a market economy to being a market society. Is this where we want to be?
In his New York Times bestseller Justice, Sandel showed himself to be a master at illuminating, with clarity and verve, the hard moral questions we confront in our everyday lives. Now, in What Money Can't Buy, he provokes an essential discussion that we, in our market-driven age, need to have: What is the proper role of markets in a democratic society—and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets don't honor and that money can't buy?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781427214928
Publisher: Macmillan Audio
Publication date: 04/24/2012
Edition description: Unabridged
Pages: 6
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 5.80(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Michael J. Sandel is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government at Harvard University, where he has taught since 1980. He is the author of many books, including Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do?, a New York Times bestseller in hardcover and paperback and a bestseller in translation in Japan and South Korea as well. He has taught his undergraduate course "Justice" to more than 15,000 Harvard students over the years, and video footage of the course were adapted into a PBS television series. Sandel graduated summa cum laude from Brandeis University and received his doctorate from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He served on the George W. Bush administration's President's Council on Bioethics. He lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

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What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
BenjaminXJackson More than 1 year ago
Anyone who is interested in in the shape and direction of our society should read this book. In What Money Can't Buy, Michael Sandel provides an interesting counter-point to the market fundamentalism that dominates our society today. In the United States we have been encouraged to let markets solve every problem, but there are limitations to the market. What Sandel asks is whether or not puttting something up for sale devalues it. Using examples including human blood, time, and civic involvement, he answers that selling something can cheapen it. I think everyone should read this book and think about what kind of society we want to live in, especially as we go through a round of elections where this discussion is being brought into sharp relief. Buy a copy or visit your library and get one. The questions in this book are some of the most important we face, and this is a side of the discussion that is too seldom heard.
mochipupalade More than 1 year ago
This was a truly great book that really made me think. I highly recommend it!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too few writers work in the area of nonmonetary quantification of value. Sandel makes this an interesting read, presenting several approaches to look at the ways society assigns importance to every part of out lives. Wonderful discussion group starter.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fascinating!