What to Do When Children Clam Up in Psychotherapy: Interventions to Facilitate Communication

What to Do When Children Clam Up in Psychotherapy: Interventions to Facilitate Communication

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781462530427
Publisher: Guilford Publications, Inc.
Publication date: 06/30/2017
Series: Creative Arts and Play Therapy
Pages: 247
Sales rank: 576,429
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author


Cathy A. Malchiodi, PhD, ATR-BC, LPCC, LPAT, REAT, is an art therapist, expressive arts therapist, and clinical mental health counselor, as well as a recognized authority on art therapy with children, adults, and families. She has given more than 400 presentations on art therapy and has published numerous articles, chapters, and books, including Understanding Children’s Drawings and Handbook of Art Therapy, Second Edition. Dr. Malchiodi is the founder and executive director of the Trauma-Informed Practices and Expressive Arts Therapy Institute. She has worked with a variety of community, national, and international agencies, particularly on the use of art therapy for trauma intervention, disaster relief, mental health, medical illness, and prevention. She is the first person to have received all three of the American Art Therapy Association's highest honors: Distinguished Service Award, Clinician Award, and Honorary Life Member Award. She has also received honors from the Kennedy Center and Very Special Arts in Washington, DC. A passionate advocate for the role of the arts in health, she is a blogger for Psychology Today. Dr. Malchiodi is coeditor (with David A. Crenshaw) of Guilford's Creative Arts and Play Therapy series.

David A. Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S, is Clinical Director of the Children’s Home of Poughkeepsie, New York, and Adjunct Faculty at Marist College. He has taught graduate courses in play therapy at Johns Hopkins University and Columbia University and has published widely on child and adolescent therapy, child abuse and trauma, and resilience in children. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association and of its Division of Child and Adolescent Psychology, Dr. Crenshaw has received lifetime achievement awards from the New York Association for Play Therapy and the Hudson Valley Psychological Association. He is a past chair of the board of directors of the Coalition against Sexual and Domestic Abuse and a member of the professional advisory board of the Courthouse Dogs Foundation and of the Dutchess County Task Force against Human Trafficking. He is coeditor (with Cathy A. Malchiodi) of Guilford's Creative Arts and Play Therapy series.

Table of Contents


I. General Principles to Guide Practice 
1. Why Children Clam Up in Therapy, Cathy A. Malchiodi & David A. Crenshaw 
2. Resistance in Child Psychotherapy: Playing Hide-and-Seek, David A. Crenshaw 
3. A Neurosequential Therapeutics Approach to Guided Play, Play Therapy, and Activities for Children Who Won't Talk, Richard L. Gaskill & Bruce D. Perry 
II. Master Clinician Approaches
4. The Sound of Silence in Play Therapy, Anne L. Stewart & Lennis G. Echterling 
5. Play Therapy with Children Who Don't Want to Talk: "Sometimes We Talk, and Sometimes We Play," Nancy Boyd Webb 
6. Polyvagal Informed Dance/Movement Therapy with Children Who Shut Down: Restoring Core Rhythmicity, Amber Elizabeth Gray & Stephen Porges 
7. Play Therapy through the Lens of Interpersonal Neurobiology: Up and over the 
Mountain, Theresa Kestly 
8. Treating Adolescent Attachment Trauma: Ten Ways to Co-Regulate and Stay Connected, Martha B. Straus 
9. Silencing and the Culture of Sexual Violence: The “Shadow Abuser," Sarah Caprioli & David A. Crenshaw 
10. Art Therapy Approaches to Facilitate Verbal Expression: Getting Past the Impasse, Cathy A. Malchiodi 
11. Animal Assisted Play Therapy with Reticent Children: With a Little Help from Friends, Risë VanFleet & Tracie Faa-Thompson 
Index

Interviews


Clinicians working with 4- to 16-year-olds, including child psychologists; art, play, and other creative therapists; social workers; counselors; and child psychiatrists. May serve as a supplemental text in graduate-level courses.
 

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