×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

What to Do When You're Sad & Lonely: A Guide for Kids
     

What to Do When You're Sad & Lonely: A Guide for Kids

by James J. Crist
 

All kids feel sad and lonely sometimes. Growing numbers of children are living with depression, a disease often mistaken for sadness. This reassuring book offers strategies and tips kids can use to beat the blues and blahs, get a handle on their feelings, make and keep friends, and enjoy their time alone. The second part focuses on depression, bipolar disorder,

Overview

All kids feel sad and lonely sometimes. Growing numbers of children are living with depression, a disease often mistaken for sadness. This reassuring book offers strategies and tips kids can use to beat the blues and blahs, get a handle on their feelings, make and keep friends, and enjoy their time alone. The second part focuses on depression, bipolar disorder, grief, and other problems too big for kids to handle on their own, and describes what it’s like to go to counseling. Includes a Note to Grown-ups and a list of resources.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
James Crist is a clinical psychologist who recognizes the difference between the normal sadness that many children experience and the deeper depression that attacks a small percentage of young people. Through this carefully organized text, children and their caregivers can come to understand when it is okay to try to help oneself and when it is necessary to get help from other sources. The �Blues Busters� section gives several viable ideas that will help children deal with short-term depression, including talking to others, getting more exercise, and focusing on the positive. The book also goes into greater detail about dealing with more serious problems, such as grief, depression, bipolar disorder, and thoughts of suicide. The presentation of these two ends of the depression continuum is necessary to help children and their adult caregivers without oversimplifying (or exaggerating) the problem. The pictures sprinkled throughout the text are cartoon figures representing both boys and girls from a variety of racial backgrounds. They are appealing and serve to break up the text, making the book more engaging and easier to read. Crist finishes the text with a note to grown ups that details treatment options and provides a list of print and online resources. Not every family will need this book, but those who have children who struggle with mild or moderate depression will find many useful tips within. Reviewer: Wendy M. Smith-D�Arezzo
VOYA - Lucy Schall
Advising his audience to read this book and work through negative feelings with an adult, Crist describes sad and lonely feelings, distinguishes them from more serious conditions such as depression, and then suggests "Blues Busters" and ways to ask for help. He focuses on common sad and lonely feelings before telling the reader how to personalize the "Blues Busters" and develop an individual plan for healthy thinking. The author encourages connecting positively with others, making and being a friend. Next more difficult problems such as grief; depression; bipolar disorder; issues such as bullying, eating disorders, drug and alcohol use, and neglect and abuse; and suicide are discussed. After a discussion of how to start and work with counseling, "A Note to Grown-ups" provides guidance and a list of additional print and non-print sources as well as professional organization phone numbers and Web sites. Crist invites feedback from his readers via his publisher and by e-mail to help4kids@freespirit.com. Because the "real-life" illustrations include nine- to thirteen-year-olds, the book's audience is middle school or younger, but Crist's clear explanations and simple techniques-especially his advice on clarifying twisted thinking-are relevant for both children and adults. Like When Nothing Matters Anymore: A Survival Guide for Depressed Teens (Free Spirit, 1998/VOYA February 1999), marketed for older teens, this short guide will help parents, teachers, and counselors encourage good mental health habits and distinguish between short-term problems and serious disorders.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781575421896
Publisher:
Free Spirit Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
11/15/2005
Series:
What to Do When Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.42(w) x 8.38(h) x 0.28(d)
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

What People are Saying About This

Renee Burdett
"Excellent . . . provides easy-to-understand coping strategies."
MD, Board Certified Child & Adult Psychiatry

Meet the Author

Dr. James J. Crist is a psychologist specializing in children with ADHD, depression, and anxiety disorders. He is the Clinical Director and a Staff Psychologist at the Child and Family Counseling Center in Woodbridge, Virginia, where he provides psychological testing and individual, couples, and family psychotherapy for children, adolescents, and adults.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews