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What's Next?: The Problems and Prospects of Journalism
     

What's Next?: The Problems and Prospects of Journalism

by Robert Snyder (Editor)
 

The future of journalism isn't what it used to be. As recently as the mid-1960s, few would have predicted the shocks and transformations that have swept through the news business in the last three decades: the deaths of many afternoon newspapers, the emergence of television as people's primary news source and the quicksilver combinations of cable

Overview

The future of journalism isn't what it used to be. As recently as the mid-1960s, few would have predicted the shocks and transformations that have swept through the news business in the last three decades: the deaths of many afternoon newspapers, the emergence of television as people's primary news source and the quicksilver combinations of cable television, VCRs and the Internet that have changed our ways of reading, seeing, and listening.

The essays in this volume seek to illuminate the future prospects of journalism. Mindful that grandiose predictions of the world of tomorrow tend to be the fantasies and phobias of the present written large-in the 1930s and 1940s magazines such as Scribner's, Barron's, and Collier's forecast that one day we would have an airplane in every garage-the authors of What's Next? have taken a more careful view.

The writers start with what they know-the trends that they see in journalism today-and ask where will they take us in the foreseeable future. For some media, such as newspapers, the visible horizon is decades away. For others, particularly anything involving the Internet, responsible forecasts can look ahead only for a matter of years. Where the likely destinations of present trends are not entirely clear, the authors have tried to pose the kinds of questions that they believe people will have to address in years to come.

While being mindful of the tremendous influence of technology, one must remember that computers, punditry, or market share will not ordain the future of journalism. Rather, it will be determined by the sum of countless actions taken by journalists and other media professionals. These essays, with their hopes and fears, cautions and enthusiasms, questions and answers, are an effort to create the best possible future for journalism. This volume will be of interest to media professionals, academics and others with an interest in the future of journalism.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Essays examine current trends in journalism, especially American journalism, and ask where they will take us in the future. They look at demographic trends to venture some predictions on who the journalists of the next century will be; discuss prospects of magazines, network and cable television, and newspapers; analyze the role of business news in defining the face of international reporting; and explore the intersection of radio and the Internet and its consequences for international news. Originally published in the , spring/summer, 1999. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780765807090
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
04/30/2000
Series:
Media Studies Series
Pages:
163
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.56(d)

Meet the Author

Robert Giles is editor-in-chief of Media Studies Journal, senior vice president of the Freedom Forum, and executive director of the Media Studies Center. Formerly the editor and publisher of The Detroit News, he is the author of Newsroom Management: A Guide to Theory and Practice. Robert W. Snyder is managing editor of the Media Studies Journal, a historian, and co-author of Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and Their New York. He has taught at Princeton University and New York University.

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