When Self-Consciousness Breaks: Alien Voices and Inserted Thoughts

When Self-Consciousness Breaks: Alien Voices and Inserted Thoughts

by G. Lynn Stephens, George Graham

Paperback(New Edition)

$5.75

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262692847
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 01/24/2003
Series: Philosophical Psychopathology
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 212
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author

G. Lynn Stephens is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

George Graham is a Professor of Philosophy and Neuroscience at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Table of Contents

Series Forewordix
Acknowledgementsxi
1Introduction1
1.1Swallowing Candy1
1.2What Is This Book About?4
1.3Overview of Main Ideas7
2Voice Lessons13
2.1Conceiving Voices13
2.2What Is Inner Speech?18
2.3Mouths Wide Open20
2.4Fast Confabulation26
3The Auditory-Hallucination Model of Voices33
3.1The Prospect of a Theory33
3.2Hallucination and Perception35
3.3Reality Discrimination40
3.4Going in Circles44
4A First Tale of Hoffman49
4.1The Best of the AHM Accounts49
4.2A Touch of the Bizarre51
4.3The Input Account57
4.4The Core of Hoffman's Account59
4.5First Critiques62
4.6Cognitive Breakdown and Schizophrenia66
4.7Inspecting Nonself Attribution69
5A Second Tale of Hoffman79
5.1The Akins-Dennett Regress Objection79
5.2Another Regress Objection85
5.3Self-Attribution, Introspection, and Attitudes88
5.4Discourse Planning, Inner Speech, and the Experience of Unintendedness93
5.5Silent Radios97
5.6Reality Testing106
6Thought Insertion117
6.1Just What the Theorist Ordered117
6.2What Is Thought Insertion?119
6.3Thought Insertion and Ego-Boundary Confusion121
6.4Boundary Confusion and Multiple Personality Disorder128
6.5Frith as Motetus133
7In the Frankfurt School145
7.1Frankfurtian Externality145
7.2The Conceptual Problem of Externalization146
7.3A Frankfurtian Concept of Alienation151
8Alienated Self-Consciousness Explained157
8.1Framing the Explanation157
8.2Explaining Failure of Self-Attribution158
8.3Explaining Alienation172
8.4Concluding Compulsively176
Bibliography185
Index195

What People are Saying About This

Jennifer Radden

When Self-Consciousness Breaks is a brilliant contribution to the field of philosophical psychopathology. In analyzing and linking the philosophically and psychologically puzzling phenomena of hallucination and delusions of thought insertion, Stephens and Graham have focused on some of the defining symptoms of major mental disorder. These authors offer a discussion which unites adjacent research programs: philosophers concerned with the nature of consciousness and researchers trying to characterize the symptoms of abnormal psychology. With a sensitivity to phenomenological nuance and an impressive grasp of the literature from each of these two research fields, Stephens and Graham have written a lucid, informed, and original book, offering their own explanation of these psychopathological symptoms. As an illustration of the way abnormal psychology helps us understand normal psychology, When Self-Consciousness Breaks is a tour de force.

From the Publisher

Stephens and Graham are unique among the new-wave of philosophical psychopathologists in combining cutting-edge research in modern philosophy of mind with an authroitative command of the cognitive science literature and a finely nuanced understanding of clinical psychopathology. Their 'break down of agency' model of the remarkable symptom of schizophrenic thought insertion is a truly seminal contribution to the philosophy of psychiatry.

Professor K. W. M. Fulford , Department of Philosophy, University of Warwick; Honorary consultant Psychiatrist, University of Oxford

When Self-Consciousness Breaks is a brilliant contribution to the field of philosophical psychopathology. In analyzing and linking the philosophically and psychologically puzzling phenomena of hallucination and delusions of thought insertion, Stephens and Graham have focused on some of the defining symptoms of major mental disorder. These authors offer a discussion which unites adjacent research programs: philosophers concerned with the nature of consciousness and researchers trying to characterize the symptoms of abnormal psychology. With a sensitivity to phenomenological nuance and an impressive grasp of the literature from each of these two research fields, Stephens and Graham have written a lucid, informed, and original book, offering their own explanation of these psychopathological symptoms. As an illustration of the way abnormal psychology helps us understand normal psychology, When Self-Consciousness Breaks is a tour de force.

Jennifer Radden , Department of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts

This book is philosophically subtle and thorough, empirically sophisticated, and sensitive to the complex phenomenology of both normal and abnormal experience.

Stephen E. Braude , University of Maryland Baltimore County

This book is philosophically subtle and thorough empirically sophisticated and sensitive to the complex phenomenology of both normal and abnormal experience.

Stephen E. Braude , University of Maryland at Baltimore County

Endorsement

This book is philosophically subtle and thorough empirically sophisticated and sensitive to the complex phenomenology of both normal and abnormal experience.

Stephen E. Braude, University of Maryland at Baltimore County

Professor K. W. M. Fulford

Stephens and Graham are unique among the new-wave of philosophical psychopathologists in combining cutting-edge research in modern philosophy of mind with an authroitative command of the cognitive science literature and a finely nuanced understanding of clinical psychopathology. Their 'break down of agency' model of the remarkable symptom of schizophrenic thought insertion is a truly seminal contribution to the philosophy of psychiatry.

Stephen E. Braude

This book is philosophically subtle and thorough empirically sophisticated and sensitive to the complex phenomenology of both normal and abnormal experience.

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