Where Futures End

Where Futures End

by Parker Peevyhouse

Hardcover

$16.19 $17.99 Save 10% Current price is $16.19, Original price is $17.99. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Thursday, September 27?   Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Shipping at checkout.
    Same Day shipping in Manhattan. 
    See Details

Overview

Where Futures End by Parker Peevyhouse

"One of the most ambitious YA novels I've ever read."—Tommy Wallach, author of We All Looked Up

Perfect for fans of innovative storytelling, like Marcus Sedgwick's The Ghosts of Heaven and David Mitchell's The Bone Clocks, Where Futures End is a collection of five time-spanning, interconnected novellas that weave a subtly science-fictional web stretching out from the present into the future, presenting eerily plausible possibilities for social media, corporate sponsorship, and humanity, as our world collides with a mysterious alternate universe.

 
Five teens, five futures. Dylan develops a sixth sense that allows him to glimpse another world. Brixney must escape a debtor colony by finding a way to increase the number of hits on her social media feed so she’ll attract corporate sponsorship. Epony goes “High Concept” and poses as an otherworldly being to recapture her boyfriend’s attention. Reef struggles to survive in a city turned virtual gameboard. And Quinn uncovers the alarming secret that links them all.
 
These are stories about a world that is destroying  itself, and about the alternate world that might be its savior.  Unless it’s just the opposite.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780803741607
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 02/09/2016
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 760,183
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Parker Peevyhouse teaches part-time at a tutoring center and a K–8 school. She loves puzzles, games, and riddles of all kinds and can't pass up a chance to take in California's amazing scenery. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family. Where Futures End is her debut novel.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Where Futures End 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
"All accidents are magic." One year from now in "When We Asked the Impossible" Dylan is desperate to believe that there is more out there and that he can be more himself if only he can get back to the tantalizing world that haunts his childhood memories. Ten years from now in "When We Were TV" Brixney is positive she can get her brother, and by extension herself, out of a debtor's colony. All she needs is more views on her social media feed. An unexpected visitor to Flavor Foam could be exactly what she needs. Thirty years from now in "When We Went High-Concept" Epony is running out of ways to save her family when their town is flooded. Soon she's forced into an impossible position, her entire online presence erased and her life inextricably altered in a bid to go high-concept. Sixty years from now in "When We Could Hardly Contain Ourselves" Reef struggles to survive while finding distraction if not comfort in the virtual game playing out across the city's streets. Until it all goes wrong. One hundred years from now in "When We Ended it All" Quinn embarks on her coming-of-age quest to find a token to bring back for a husband she isn't sure she wants. During her travels she meets a stranger. On the first day Quinn will tell her story. On the second day he will tell his story and things will begin to come together. On the third day, one of them will die. Quinn will choose who. Five people. Five stories. Two worlds. One moment they have all been moving toward in Where Futures End (2016) by Parker Peevyhouse. Where Futures End is Peevyhouse's debut novel. This ambitious novel is broken into five interconnected sections that work on their own as short stories and seamlessly come together to create a larger narrative of a world and its mutable future. Where Futures End strikes a fine balance between science fiction and fantasy as readers and characters try to reconcile a changing world with basis in scientific fact with the wondrous consequences of those changes. This eerily prescient book is filled with distinct and haunting characters as well as rich and intricate world building. Where Futures End is a smart and thoughtful book that is perfect for readers looking to completely immerse themselves in a story. Ideal for readers who enjoy tales of portal fantasies, parallel worlds or alternate universes, and short science fiction. Highly recommended. Possible Pairings: The Magicians by Lev Grossman; The Curiosities: A Collection of Stories by Maggie Stiefvater, Brenna Yovanoff, Tessa Gratton, The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick
annasmama More than 1 year ago
This is such an unusual story. The whole novel is broken down into five smaller stories where we follow a character through his or her experience to something that ultimately changes the world. As a reader, you kind of connect the dots from one story to another to understand the ending. This can be a bit of a gamble maybe? I didn't find it difficult to piece things together, and I loved that you had to draw your own conclusions about some things. My favorite part by far was the characters. In each story, the author creates incredibly complex characters that I immediately cared about. Each one has challenging relationships with loved ones and friends. I would have read the story for that alone. I always wanted to know more about each story. I definitely recommend this novel to sci-fi/fantasy fans, especially fans of stories featuring a costly moral dilemma or the end of the world.
Chancie More than 1 year ago
It had a great premise that could have wound together some interesting stories. The problem is that none of the stories get fleshed out enough, so I spent the entire time feeling lost, confused, and a little frustrated. By the time I started to understand and become interested in the story, it would end and switch to an entirely new story. Any one of these short stories could have been expanded into a full novel, and I think I would have preferred that instead. It has a solid voice and strong writing style, but there isn't enough room in any short story to see it through to the full potential. It's ambitious, yes, but it just isn't successful at what it tries to do.
SAlexander More than 1 year ago
WHERE FUTURES END by PARKER PEEVEYHOUSE is unique, refreshing and utterly compelling. Dark and gritty, the narrative pulls you through five interlinking, heart-breaking stories towards a powerful climax. Each character draws you into their story so deeply you don’t want to leave – but you have to, and that’s OK because the next character drags you even deeper into their world. There are so many layers to this book – it made me question all my questions. If I could have jumped into the book and lived with these characters, I would’ve done. The Other Place will stay with me for a long time.
Kathy MacMillan More than 1 year ago
In this twisty mindbender of a book, Parker Peevyhouse gives us five interconnected stories, each set a little further in the future – a future where our world has become intertwined with an alternate one that brushes up against it. The choices of these five teens uncover the mystery of the Other Place more and more, until a choice is made that changes the fate of one world forever. As in any good sci-fi projection of the future, the parts of the book that are most chilling are those that are the most realistic: the way that Brixney, ten years from now, moves into a debtors’ colony with her brother after their parents die in an accident. The way that Epony, thirty years from now, has to remake herself online in order to survive. The way that Reef’s livelihood is pursuing credits in a virtual reality game that overlays the city of Seattle. The way that conglomerates like Microsoft-Verizon casually take over the world and push people out of their homes as the oceans rise due to global warming. A sobering commentary on society, technology, and humanity’s penchant for making destructive choices.