Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet

Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet

by Matthew Lyon, Katie Hafner
3.7 19

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Overview

Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet by Matthew Lyon, Katie Hafner

Twenty five years ago, it didn't exist. Today, twenty million people worldwide are surfing the Net. Where Wizards Stay Up Late is the exciting story of the pioneers responsible for creating the most talked about, most influential, and most far-reaching communications breakthrough since the invention of the telephone.
In the 1960's, when computers where regarded as mere giant calculators, J.C.R. Licklider at MIT saw them as the ultimate communications devices. With Defense Department funds, he and a band of visionary computer whizzes began work on a nationwide, interlocking network of computers. Taking readers behind the scenes, Where Wizards Stay Up Late captures the hard work, genius, and happy accidents of their daring, stunningly successful venture.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780684872162
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 08/19/1999
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 699,435
File size: 542 KB

About the Author


Katie Hafner is a technology correspondent at Newsweek and coauthor of Cyberpunk: Outlaws and Hackers on the Computer Frontier. Matthew Lyon and Katie Hafner are married and live in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Where Wizards Stay Up Late, by Hafner and Lyon, is an excellent source of history about the birth of the Internet. Many people have surfed the Net or sent email, but not all of those who use these technologies know the reasons for its existence. Hafner and Lyon provide the answers to questions of the Internet¿s existence and it does so in a very understandable way. It uses the actual accounts of the research scientists who were responsible for the research and design of interconnecting computers. The purpose of this interconnection was to make four different computers using telephone lines in four different places to communicate and transfer information. Thus forming the ARPANET. The people involved with this fascinating discovery were members of the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA), which was a division of the Defense Department. The story begins in the 1950¿s as a result of an indirect request by President Eisenhower to use scientific research to help improve the nation¿s defense and continues through the 1960¿a with the first ever connection of distant computers. The authors also mention how well known corporations, such as the U.S. Postal Service, IBM, and AT&T, denied the potential capabilities of the ARPANET. Many people believe that the ARPANET was invented to stand as a communication tool for the military that could withstand a nuclear assault. Hafner and Lyon do a fine job to clear up this presumption and provide a sense of respect for those who were responsible for ARPANET. They mention the key individuals who were with ARPA and Bolt Beranek and Newman from the beginning. This review did its best to keep away from repeating the content covered in this wonderful journey through history. Although the content does get a little wordy and technical towards the end, overall, Where Wizard Stay Up Late is an enjoyable reading experience for those interested in the origins of the ever flowing and growing Internet. Yes, it is a history lesson, but it unveils the history in an interesting way.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Where Wizards Stay Up Late by Katie hafner and Matthew Lyon is an account of some of the most important late twentieth century technological inventions and advances. The majority of the book takes place in Washington D.C., where President Eisenhower spearheaded America’s leap into military science and technology after the launch of Sputnik II. The book covers topics from the creation and debugging of the first IMP in 1969 to the e-mail and why it begun. Where Wizards Stay Up Late describes in detail the process scientists went through to connect both the east and west coast with one single network and how their process was hindered by the Vietnam War. The book frequently incorporates aspects of not only scientific history but world history as well, emphasizing how certain historical events catalyzed the advance of technology in the US. Fascinating topics such as the exploration of e-mail in 1972 by the ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network). Most interesting of all is the events leading up to the creation of the internet in the last chapter. It shows that the most popular forms of modern day technology were not all invented to serve the purpose they do now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"I know. Abd I wish I could spend more time here. My brother, in other words, me, I say my brother becuase thats my camo in a way, is going to ethics, so I will dissapear.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Daddy" she sniffs
samSC More than 1 year ago
This book to me was not very interesting. It had a lot of good information in it, but I am not a technology person. The author is a very good writer, but it was not interesting to me. The characters were not the most exciting characters. I did learn a lot about how the computer came about, and how the ARPANET works. The internet is an extremely big achievement for these people. If you are a technology person, this is the book for you. Sami C
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Where Wizards Stay up Late is the long and full history of the formation of the modern web, or internet. The formation of the ARPANET with only an original 15 nodes was developed into the full scale modern internet we know and love today. The book's introduction is based on the background of the time period and what world events were taking place at the time. The cold war had brought about new technological developments with the pressure of the Space Race. The book covers the main contributors of the ARPANET and also tells of the reunion of the engineers 10 years later. I would recommend this book to anyone looking to see the origins of the modern internet or someone who is simply fascinated with the science behind it. (D.S.) 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet is an intriguing novel about the scientists responsible for creating the internet. Since the internet is such a big part of all of our lives, I thought this book would be a good choice for me. I expected it to be dull and boring but I was very surprised. It was much better than I could have ever imagined. The authors presented the information is such a tasteful way that I didn’t want to stop reading. I found it so inspiring how these scientists came together to create something so revolutionary. When they first created the internet, they had no idea it would be what it was today. Now it is one of the most powerful and important inventions ever made and most of the scientists who made it are barely even recognized. When one of these scientists names were said, the average person would have no idea who they are, but because I read this book I now know who they are and how important they are. By reading this book I feel more connected to the past and the computer science industry in general. I also learned a lot about computers and technology. Another reason I liked the book was because of the struggles the scientists had to encounter. The way they found breakthroughs within these mishaps showed me how to find positive messages in the mishaps of my life. This book was much more than I expected, and I highly recommend it!
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Studmuffin34 More than 1 year ago
This book was a great read. I loved it. It was extremely informative about how the Internet was first created and how it grew and expanded from the small, with only 15 nodes, ARPANET, to the world wide web that links millions of computers around the globe. Hafner and Lyon have created a great read that captures the history and the awesomeness of the origins of the Internet. These men will forever be remembered of the fathers of the web, they have changed technology forever and have greatly bettered the world by doing so. This book takes readers behind the scenes of all the hard work, long hours, genius, and the "happy accidents of the successful ordeal. Some of the characters are great too. Some of them are even college students when they first created the ARPANET. I think that is amazing, but it just goes to show you that anyone can do anything no matter how old. Everyone in the world ho cares about where the @ symbol comes from on email addresses, or the "www" in front of a website, should definitely go out to there local bookstore and purchase this book! It's no surprise it was "one of Library Journal's picks for best Sci-Tech book of the year."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book to do some research for a paper I am writing. I downloaded the free sample and it worked fine. So I bought it and as soon I tried to download it onto the barnes and noble e-reader on my laptop, the e-reader quit. I have tried this multiple and each time I the little message "Barnes & Noble eReader quit unexpectedly." and then in small print..."Click to reopen. This report will be sent to Apple automatically."
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was very informative. I kept me on the edge when I read it. Each moment the story gave me the feeling of what were the characters going to do to get over the next 'hurdle' that came thier way. It leaves the reader asking for more up until the last page!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book provides a very in depth look at how the Internet started, but it in a very boring way.