White Sands, Red Menace

White Sands, Red Menace

by Ellen Klages
4.7 17

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White Sands, Red Menace 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the first and second book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There is its called the green glass sea
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked white sands red menace better than the green glass sea. I felt the topics were really interesting as well as the green glass sea. The books are must reads and some of my favs. Totally recommended to anyone 9-10 and up!!!!!! Buy it now!!!!!!!!! Read the green glass sea first though. Read NOW!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just fineshed reading it and its amazing i wish there was a anther book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It really did a great job of continuing the story and connecting the reader to real historic events.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE THIS BOOK IT IS TOTALLY AMAZING!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Julie Harrison-Mullany More than 1 year ago
A very good book for all ages! She producesna just as great book as before she finishes with a astounding sequal!
jkr More than 1 year ago
Dewey and Suze's story (see review of "The Green Glass Sea") continues, after the Bomb has exploded and after World War II has ended. The girls are well into adolescence now, and their involvement in the larger world deepens as issues such as gender roles, race, and the political implications of science come more explicitly into focus. If that makes the book sound too heavy, or heavy-handed, for its intended audience, fear not: Klages's lovely writing and character development are still primary. While the book is serious and at times heart-breaking, appealing perhaps to a slightly older group of readers than its predecessor, the messages never overwhelm the people or their stories. In fact, to my taste the best part of the book was the depiction of Suze and Dewey's deep and complex friendship as they support and nurture (and sometimes envy and come into conflict with) each other's very different talents and characters. This is a thoroughly worthwhile sequel, and I have no hesitation in recommending both books to any young (or older) reader capable of engagement with material of this intelligence and depth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mother-Daughter-Book-Club More than 1 year ago
It's such a pleasure to read a sequel that lives up to and possibly even surpasses the original. White Sands, Red Menace, Ellen Klages's follow up to The Green Glass Sea is a wonderful continuation of Suze Gordon and Dewey Kerrigan's story. When The Green Glass Sea ends, Dewey's dad has died and the Gordons have taken her in. With World War II over and the atom bomb no longer a secret, they move from Los Alamos to Alamogordo, New Mexico, where Suze's dad is one of the General Electric scientists working with the Army to perfect a rocket that can go into space and carry a nuclear bomb. After seeing the results of their work in Los Alamos, Suze's mom, Terry Gordon, works to let the world know of the dangers of atomic bombs. She's fighting a rising tide of Americans' fascination with all things atomic. Suze and Dewey are starting all over again at a new school and hoping to fit in better than they did at Los Alamos. They have each other, but they hope to make new friends as well. Klages has done a masterful job of capturing the time period and the small town in New Mexico in which the story takes place. It was a time when kids had a lot of freedom to roam, time on their hands and not a lot of money or electronic attractions. This often meant they had to get creative to kill their boredom. Dewey's interest and ability in science pairs well with Suze's interest and ability in art. In their attic room, they go to work on a wall that showcases both their talents. The story moves at a leisurely pace that's somewhat like the slow summer days the girls experience at the beginning of the book, and I found myself matching my reading pace to their exploits. I also found myself dreaming of a time that was simpler in many ways and more complicated in others. There are also plenty of family dynamics for mothers and daughters to discuss: the tension between Suze's parents as her mom becomes more pacifist and her dad is caught up in the atomic craze. The tension between the two girls over parental love and attention and what makes a family. The tension between whites and those of Mexican descent in this small New Mexican town. It all adds up to a great book to read and talk about.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Rocket this. Atomic-powered that. They are all the rage in the United States during the post-War era.

Dewey and Suze have moved with Suze's scientist parents to New Mexico. Phil, Suze's dad, works endlessly on a new project -- a rocket that could eventually land on the moon while Terry, Suze's mom, obsesses over her mission against the Bomb which both she and Phil created.

Dewey and Suze love working on "the wall" in their new bedroom. They tinker, build, and add more and more to the carefully constructed contraptions, even though girls aren't supposed to be interested in things like that. When Dewey's long-lost mother shows up, Dewey struggles to understand the meaning of family.

Take a trip back in time and be fascinated by people and events that created history and helped shape the world as we know it.