The White Wolf and Other Fireside Tales

The White Wolf and Other Fireside Tales

by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781540823946
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 12/05/2016
Pages: 270
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.57(d)

About the Author

Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch ; (21 November 1863 - 12 May 1944) was a British writer who published under the pen name of Q. He is primarily remembered for the monumental Oxford Book Of English Verse 1250-1900 (later extended to 1918), and for his literary criticism. He guided the taste of many who never met him, including American writer Helene Hanff, author of 84, Charing Cross Road and its sequel, Q's Legacy; and the fictional Horace Rumpole, via John Mortimer, his literary amanuensis.
Quiller-Couch was born at Bodmin in Cornwall to the union of two ancient local families, the Quiller family and the Couch family, and was the third in line of intellectuals from the Couch family. His younger sisters Florence Mabel and Lilian M. were also writers and folklorists. His father, Dr. Thomas Quiller Couch (d. 1884), was a noted physician, folklorist and historian. His grandfather, Jonathan Couch, was an eminent naturalist, also a physician, historian, classicist, apothecary, and illustrator (particularly of fish) in the style of the time. His son, Bevil Brian Quiller-Couch, was a war hero and poet, whose romantic letters to his fiancée, the poet May Wedderburn Cannan, were published in Tears of War. He also had a daughter, Foy Felicia, to whom Kenneth Grahame inscribed a first edition of his The Wind in the Willows attributing Quiller-Couch as the inspiration for the character Ratty.

He was educated at Newton Abbot Preparatory College, at Clifton College, and Trinity College, Oxford and later became a lecturer there. On taking his degree in 1886 he was for a short time classical lecturer at Trinity. After some journalistic experience in London, mainly as a contributor to the Speaker, in 1891 he settled at Fowey in Cornwall.

In Cornwall he was an active worker in politics for the Liberal Party. He was knighted in 1910, and in 1928 was made a Bard of Gorseth Kernow, taking the Bardic name Marghak Cough ('Red Knight'). He was Commodore of the Royal Fowey Yacht Club from 1911 until his death.

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