Who Am I and Where Is Home?: An American Woman in 1931 Palestine

Who Am I and Where Is Home?: An American Woman in 1931 Palestine

by Andrea Jackson

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780692872383
Publisher: Andrea Jackson
Publication date: 07/11/2017
Pages: 264
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

A native of New York City and the daughter of Celia Antopolsky, Andrea Jackson practiced law for twenty years before turning to creative writing. She holds a Masters in Creative Writing from the University of Missouri - St. Louis. She and her husband have two children and five grandchildren. Website: www.andreajackson.net.

Table of Contents

Contents Chapter 1—The farthest adventure yet Chapter 2—I must fill my eyes with innocence Chapter 3—There is no rebellion among the Buffalonians (Letters from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, September 19, 1930 to October 16, 1930) Chapter 4—I can’t enjoy my spaghetti without you (Correspondence between Harry Neiman and Celia Antopolsky, September 18, 1930 to October 19, 1930) Chapter 5—Bullets in her bra Chapter 6—Dear friend of a sudden meeting (Correspondence between Harry Neiman and Celia Antopolsky, February 6, 1930 and November 1 to November 5, 1930) Chapter 7—We know how to do this Chapter 8—The most stirring speech ever made (Letters from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, October 21, 1930 to November 18, 1930) Chapter 9—If an Arab approaches you menacingly (Lillian Shapiro’s impressions of life in Jerusalem) Chapter 10—They knew they couldn’t stop us Chapter 11—Station IKE (Correspondence between Celia Antopolsky and her family, November 14, 1930 to February 12, 1931) Chapter 12—An ivory cigarette holder Chapter 13—“To see the World as Beauty” (Letters from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, November 21, 1930 to November 28, 1930) Chapter 14—Dear Boy (Correspondence between Harry Neiman and Celia Antopolsky, December ___ 1930 to February 25, 1931) Chapter 15—Shout through the streets of Zion (Letters from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, December 17, 1930 to February 26, 1931) Chapter 16—Ellis, sex, and Nietzsche (Excerpts from Celia Antopolsky’s journal, November 28, 1928 to May 25, 1929) Chapter 17—Are you too moulding dream hills? (Letters from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, January 29, 1931 to April, 1931) Chapter 18—Dearest far-away family (Correspondence between Celia Antopolsky and her family, February 12, 1931 to April 15, 1931) Chapter 19—Smug complacency and stupid egotism (Letters between Celia Antopolsky and Harry Neiman, March 12, 1931 to June 1, 1931) Chapter 20—Please, Celia—destroy this letter (Correspondence between Lillian Shapiro and Celia Antopolsky, March 20, 1931 to April 27, 1931) Chapter 21—I am sincere in my emotions (Letters from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, April 6, 1931 to July, 1931) Chapter 22—You see, we really want you to come home (Correspondence between Celia Antopolsky and her family, April 17, 1931 to September 24, 1931) Chapter 23—“Did she fall in love with someone there?” (Correspondence among Celia Antopolsky, Lillian Shapiro and Joey Marks, May 4, 1931 to August 26, 1931) Chapter 24—Languidly, I think of going back (Correspondence between Harry Neiman and Celia Antopolsky, June 23, 1931 to November 16, 1931) Chapter 25—Cable her to meet the boat (Correspondence between Lillian Shapiro and Celia Antopolsky, August 27, 1931 to December 5, 1931) Chapter 26—So full a year as we have had (Letter and telegram from Ellis Radinsky to Celia Antopolsky, December 1 and 2, 1931) Chapter 27—This is how people go out of your life (Letters from Ruth Light, a friend in Jerusalem, to Celia Antopolsky, December 3, 1931 and January 31, 1932) Chapter 28—The American girl from Jerusalem Chapter 29—Fourteen days on that boat Chapter 30—Afterword

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