Who Do You Think You Are?: The Essential Guide to Tracing Your Family History

Who Do You Think You Are?: The Essential Guide to Tracing Your Family History

by Megan Smolenyak, Wall to Wall Media
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Who Do You Think You Are?: The Essential Guide to Tracing Your Family History 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good read. Many times one tends to think of genealogical works as being a long list of names to be read in a research room of an historical society. Such an environment can be intimidating, even to a phd candidate. This book helps to give one a comfort level about embarking on a genealogical research adventure. One need not be "Indiana Jones" to find adventure and uncover the answers to interesting mysteries of one's family/ancestors. So, do it for yourself. Do it for your kids. Do it for posterity. A fedora is optional, but a sense of adventure is required.
jriggle1981 More than 1 year ago
This is a must for anyone researching their ancestry! I loved it, it was so helpful it clearing up some confusion in my research.
Joyachiever More than 1 year ago
"Who Do You Think You Are" is an interesting book on discovering family history. I admit that I became interested in this book due to my intent on finding my biological father and paternal grandmother. It is important for me to obtain some closure and confirm my racial heritages. I say this because my foster mother told me about my father's Puerto Rican background, and the possibility that my grandmother on his side may be African American. His physical phenotype is similar to that of musician Daddy Yankee (except with curly hair). My real mother has Native American ancestry, with straight brown hair and brown eyes (similar complexion, hair color, and eye color as Teri Hatcher). My foster mother was kind enough to tell me certain key details about my biological parents back when I was 12). She did this because of her knowledge that I last saw both my biological father and mother in person around the time I was 6. In addition, It was obvious to her that I would eventually set out to find my history. I intend to find my biological father because I sense that he would know certain information to the answers inside of me. This book has information for me to close this gap, and the following is certain data featured in this book: Obtaining Vital Records: Details are given regarding online websites for locating family history. I also like the feature of certain shortcuts to take for scouting indexes such as the Ancestry and free Family Search websites. The Ancestry website is one of the listings that I am intrigued to check out first. Magazines: This book lists essential magazines to look into for inspiring stories, case studies, and further resources on tracing family history. Information on certain specialty websites such as Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness "Who Do You Think You Are" is an important book to get for anyone ready to uncover details in researching their family background.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The draft officer asked no questions. He took in my appearance, declared me applicable, and asked me what mount I had. <p> "Hummingbird." I said, swallowing. <p> He looked up at me from scrawling on a piece of paper bark. "You nervous, kid?" <p> I gave a short nod, rocking back on my heels. <p> " 'Kay. . . You'll be in the hummingbird squadron, under the command of Captain Beryl." <p> "Okay." I said softly. I gripped Abernald's reins. <p> "Alright. Go to Magnolia Center. They'll take you to the camp from there." <p> I nodded once more and climbed onto Abernald's back. I gently tapped his side and we shot off, heading for the massive magnolia tree that housed Magnolia Center. <p> Though it was always bustling, it was simply packed today. Soldiers were herding crowds of recruits around. I landed quickly and looked around. <p> "Hey! Grunt! You joining the war?" <p> My eyes searched for the speaker. It was a burly soldier, his arms crossed and his eyes hard. <p> "Um, yes--yes, Sir. . ." I stammered. <p> He stared at me a moment longer before bursting into laughter. I watched in confusion. <p> "That never gets old." He wheezed and thumped me on the back. "Okay, kid. Who's your officer?" <p> "Captain Beryl, Sir." I responded, still a bit intimidated by him. <p> "Ol' Beryl? There's your ride to the camp." He pointed through the crowd. I had to squint to see what it was. <p> "A--a raccoon?" I asked. "Isn't that dangerous?" <p> "Ah, Bertie's a good ole' beastie. And he wears a muzzle." The soldier winked to me before walking away, muttering. <p> I licked my dry lips and led Abernald through the crowd towards the raccoon. <p> "Here. I'll take him." A new voice sounded by my head. <p> A soldier with bronze hair cropped short and tousled was watching me, holding out a hand. Behind him, a small herd of hummingbirds twittered and pecked at each other. <p> I stared at his hand blankly. <p> "The reins. The old raccoon doesn't like them on his back." He pressed. Slowly, I placed the reins in his outstretched hand. <p> "My name's Scoria. You?" <p> "Uh--Trillium. . . My name's Trillium. . ." I mumbled, my heart pounding. <p> His amber gaze studied me intently. "Trillium." He said, the l's lilting under his tongue. "That's a nice name." <p> "Thank you. . . Sir. . ." <p> "No sir." He laughed. "Just Scoria. I'm no higher in rank than you. A recruit." <p> A tenative smile crossed my face. <p> Just then, a horn blew. Scoria looked up. "That's the signal. Bertie's leaving soon. Better hurry. I'll see you around, Trillium." He gave me a two-fingered salute before walking off, leading the bickering birds along. <p> When the horn blew again, I started out of my daze and dashed to the raccoon. <p> ~ Haunted &#65430<_>mmortal
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