Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha, and Mohammed Cross the Road?: Christian Identity in a Multi-Faith World

Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha, and Mohammed Cross the Road?: Christian Identity in a Multi-Faith World

by Brian D. McLaren
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Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha, and Mohammed Cross the Road?: Christian Identity in a Multi-Faith World 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
mojo_turbo More than 1 year ago
Can you be a “good Christian” without condemning members of other faiths? How should followers of Christ treat members of other religions? These are the questions that Brian McLaren tries to address in this book. I have read a lot of Brian’s books and I do appreciate him as an author and for what he brings to the table, but in a lot of ways this book felt much like his previous title A Generous Orthodoxy. In AGO, Brian tries to argue for the center of many of today’s Christian denominations and in Cross the Road, Brian now attempts to do that same thing for other faiths. If you don’t know, Brian McLaren is an author, speaker, pastor, and networker among innovative Christian leaders, thinkers, and activists. He is the author of A New Kind of Christian, A Generous Orthodoxy, The Secret Message of Jesus, and Everything Must Change.  Time magazine called him one of America’s top twenty-five evangelicals and he has been a guest on Nightline and Larry King Live. In his new book, Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha and Mohammad Cross the Road, McLaren begins each chapter with the word “how.”  How did a Muslim boy convert me? How your friends can be more dangerous that your enemies, How the doctrine of creation can create humankind(ness.) etc. Through each chapter, McLaren shows the reader “how” to navigate this culture where seemingly competing religions butt up side to side and he does it, not by showing our differences, or how other faith practices are wrong, but he does it by showing how in many ways we are similar. This book is about building bridges, not walls. McLaren argues that Christianity should be built on “benevolence and solidarity rather than rivalry and hostility.” It’s the old adage that Christians should be known for what they are “for” and not for what they are “against.” This book is an easy and simple read, McLaren’s voice is easy to listen to and compels you to keep turning pages. I think each generation calls us to reexamine our language and our methodology (not our doctrine) and certainly McLaren has a voice for this generation. I loved this book and highly recommend it. Thank you to Jericho books for a free copy for a fair and honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An excellent book every serious Christian should read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This author borders on presenting a wonderful way for Christians to live in harmony with members of all faiths which I fear can never happen in real life. In the first place, I agree that many "Christians" don't follow the teachings of Jesus. Also, I doubt that Christians can hope to follow Christ's Great Commission. Too many Christian missionaries have been and are becoming martyrs to their faith. Conservatives in many major religions are a danger to the lives and liberty of anyone who doesn't agree with them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Funny, everything this book says is the way to be, is in direct conflict with the actual word of GOD in the Bible.....