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Why Do Volcanoes Blow Their Tops?: Questions and Answers about Volcanoes and Earthquakes
     

Why Do Volcanoes Blow Their Tops?: Questions and Answers about Volcanoes and Earthquakes

by Melvin Berger, Barbara Higgins Bond (Illustrator), Gilda Berger
 

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From simple questions like "Where are volcanoes found?" to more complex ones like "What makes a volcano erupt?," this book delivers the answers kids want.

Whether children hear about volcanoes and earthquakes on television, learn about them at school, or live in vulnerable areas, they are amazed by and afraid of volcanoes and earthquakes. Kids want to know more

Overview

From simple questions like "Where are volcanoes found?" to more complex ones like "What makes a volcano erupt?," this book delivers the answers kids want.

Whether children hear about volcanoes and earthquakes on television, learn about them at school, or live in vulnerable areas, they are amazed by and afraid of volcanoes and earthquakes. Kids want to know more about them, both to satisfy their curiosity and to ease their fears. This book explains everything about these natural disasters, from what happens just before a quake or eruption to how natural disasters help renew nature's landscape.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Readers will quickly find the answers to such questions as¾"Do all volcanoes look alike? What is the largest active volcano on Earth? Where do earthquakes usually occur? Did humans ever cause an earthquake?" They will also learn the correlation between volcanoes and earthquakes. The magenta-colored questions are followed by clear and succinct answers in black type. The authors discuss the causes, what happens during the occurrence, and the effects. Full page colored drawings relate to the questions posed on the opposite page. A cutaway view shows how a volcano erupts. The section on earthquakes contains maps showing the San Andreas Fault line and a plate map of the world. The index allows the reader to quickly find specific information about topics such as a tsunami, specific volcanoes, or the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Part of the well-designed "Scholastic Question and Answer" series, this title is appropriate for researchers. Browsers, too, will enjoy it and will be fascinated to learn such facts as how the eruption of the uninhabited volcanic island of Krakatau killed 36,000 people. 2000, Scholastic,
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Information on topics of great interest in a format that is sure to appeal. The questions, set in large-print, color type, cover the whys, hows, and wheres of their subjects. The concise answers are set in smaller black type. The queries are either superimposed over attractive, colorful illustrations or face them. While children will enjoy browsing through these titles, the extensive indexes also make them useful for reports. They're particularly accessible for younger or reluctant readers who might have problems with multi-paragraphed, wordier texts.-Eunice Weech, M. L. King Elementary School, Urbana, IL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
paper: 0-439-14878-2 The Bergers present another solid and readable title in the Question and Answer Series, giving brief answers to tough questions about volcanoes and earthquakes: Where do they occur? What causes them? How do we measure them? Can we predict them? Do all volcanoes look alike? How often do earthquakes occur? Competent illustrations extend the text throughout, showing the reader the difference between a crater and a caldera, for instance, or mapping major plates of the earth's crust, and illustrating three kinds of volcanoes and three different types of eruptions. There are the predictable"disaster" illustrations, as well: San Francisco on fire in 1906 and earthquake damage in Alaska in 1964. One minor concern with the format is that some of the questions appearing in red type on a blue background are hard to read. The brief text is factual and somewhat understated. For example, the authors say,"Number 1 on the Richter scale can be seen on a seismograph, but can't be felt. Number 5 on the Richter scale is about as powerful as the explosion of a nuclear bomb. Anything over 8 means total destruction, usually with much loss of life." They do not explain, however, that an increase of one whole number on the scale indicates a ten-fold increase in the magnitude of the quake. Nor do they make clear how a nuclear bomb causes less than total destruction. No sources or notes are given for the information included. Still, there's a lot of information in this glossily bound package. With the glowing red volcano on the cover, clear white spaces, snappy question-and-answer format, and brief index, this title will have wide appeal for science readers andbrowsers.(Nonfiction. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439148788
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
11/01/2000
Series:
Scholastic Question & Answer
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
9.97(w) x 7.94(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Melvin and Gilda Berger are the authors of more than two hundred books for children. Their books have recieved awards from the National Science Teachers Association, the Library of Congress, and the New York Public Library. The Bergers live in New York.

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