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Wild, Cool & Swingin'
     

Wild, Cool & Swingin'

3.6 3
by Mrs. Miller
 
Capitol's Ultra Lounge series continues with in-depth profiles of some of the label's swinginest artists. Mrs. Miller: Wild Cool & Swingin features Miller's distinctive renditions of classics like "The Girl from Ipanema," "Yellow Submarine," "Moon River," "Monday Monday," "Bill Bailey (Won't You Please Come Home)" and more.

Overview

Capitol's Ultra Lounge series continues with in-depth profiles of some of the label's swinginest artists. Mrs. Miller: Wild Cool & Swingin features Miller's distinctive renditions of classics like "The Girl from Ipanema," "Yellow Submarine," "Moon River," "Monday Monday," "Bill Bailey (Won't You Please Come Home)" and more.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/08/1999
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
0724352033423
catalogNumber:
20334

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Wild, Cool & Swingin' 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Man...I'm not sure if this is real or not. But it's "real" funny. If you have a couple of minutes to kill, listen to the samples and cry yourself to sleep.
Guest More than 1 year ago
How could anyone not have some honest affection for Mrs. Elva Miller, the woman with the strangest 1960's pop recording career of all time? Brought into the recording studio as a bit of a joke by an acquaintance in the L.A. record industry who'd heard some of her amateur recordings, her bizarre, offkey, off tempo, yowling rendition of "Downtown" soon became a most unexpected international hit. Soon, she found herself & her inexplicable warbling vocals on the "Ed Sullivan Program" and even touring with USO shows for the army boys in Vietnam--with whom she was quite popular. No doubt, after fighting Viet Cong all week, Mrs. Miller's screeching was considerably less frightening to the boys than the unending boom of heavy artillery. Sadly, it took awhile for this fifty-ish matronly figure to realize her career was nothing more than a novelty act and a bit of a joke. She was nothing more than that year's version of "Snoopy and the Red Baron" or "Winchester Cathedral." She was devastated when she found out, but she forged ahead through 3 more major label releases, including one now rare, campy, and utterly insane album of song covers dealing with the theme of marijuana use! The cover shows the surreal spectacle of a lovebead, psychedelic-paisley wearing Mrs. Miller offering all the kids some "special brownies." Who knows, but after enough of those brownies, Mrs. Miller might have actually sounded like Nancy Sinatra. Then, a quick fadeout from the public scene and a long series of quick camera shots of her sitting in one of the front rows of the old "Mike Douglas" show, where he always made a gentlemanly effort to point her out to the crowd and welcome her aboard, a beloved but faded star. ...Then, something odd happened, thanks to Dr. Demento and other odd and bad music aficonados: Mrs. Miller made a comeback that finds her with almost as many fans as she had back in the mid-1960's. So, in the end, awful singing but a good heart won out. When will Hollywood recognize a heartwarming biography when they see it?
Guest More than 1 year ago
While it'd make a particularly creative April Fool's Day gift, it's a bit like listening to a "Make Your Pet Howl In Fits of Agonizing Pain" contest featuring particularly creative pet owners. Definitely not a title for the faint of heart or people that enjoy music. The best thing about this album is that it ends, and, if you keep your receipt, you can get your money back.