×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Wild Moments: Reveling in Nature's Signs, Songs, Cycles, and Curious Creatures
     

Wild Moments: Reveling in Nature's Signs, Songs, Cycles, and Curious Creatures

5.0 1
by Ted Williams, Verlyn Klinkenborg, Connie Isbell
 

See All Formats & Editions

For more than 30 years Ted Williams has been hailed as one of the foremost nature writers in the United States. Wild Moments is a collection of Williams's beautifully crafted seasonal observation columns complemented by the illustrations of award-winning artist John Burgoyne.

Williams explains the weather conditions that bring out the brightest reds

Overview

For more than 30 years Ted Williams has been hailed as one of the foremost nature writers in the United States. Wild Moments is a collection of Williams's beautifully crafted seasonal observation columns complemented by the illustrations of award-winning artist John Burgoyne.

Williams explains the weather conditions that bring out the brightest reds in autumn leaves, when to watch for the massive migration of northern flickers, how hungry wolf spiders catch their prey, and why American goldfinches wait until July or August to build a nest and start breeding. Although Williams lives in Massachusetts, his columns describe the natural world all across North America, with forays to other parts of the globe. So readers will learn why there are so many aspens in Yellowstone National Park and the extent of the burrowing owl's habitat (from southwestern Canada to Argentina).

Written in an inviting, accessible, and entertaining style, these concise columns are beautifully written and packed with in-depth information. Anyone who loves the natural world will find this book irresistible.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Did you know that bumblebees are native to the North American continent—but honey bees are not? Can you name the marsupial with a 12 ½ day gestation period? And, do you know where to get a yummy sapsickle? Within these one hundred and ninety-two pages, are the answers in one-page sketches of beast and bloom that start in winter and move through the seasons. Differing from many nature books, the author covers the Pacific Northwest, the desert southwest through the prairies, the Midwest, and the East Coast. He is intimate friends with damselflies, Jills-in-the-Pulpit, and fairy diddles and he spins images that puts you next to him in the field: "In flight, puffins resemble badly thrown footballs..." While this book is marketed to adults, I can easily imagine sending small ones to the land of sugar plum fairies with images of fairy shrimp, the Leonids, or woolly bears. Williams contributes to Audubon and Fly Rod & Reel magazines and is the author of The Insightful Sportsman. Lastly, if you enjoy nature, how could you not invest in a publisher who announces on the copyright page: "The mission of Storey Publishing is to serve our customers by publishing practical information that encourages personal independence in harmony with the environment." 2004, Storey Publishing, Ages Adult.
—Chris Gill

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781603424851
Publisher:
Storey Books
Publication date:
11/11/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
File size:
5 MB

Meet the Author

Since 1980, Ted Williams has been editor-at-large at Audubon magazine, writing the acclaimed "Earth Almanac" and "Incite" columns. He is the conservation editor of Fly Rod&Reel and the author of The Insightful Sportsman. Williams lives in Grafton, Massachusetts.
Verlyn Klinkenborg is the author of The Last Fine Time, Making Hay, and The Rural Life. His articles have appeared in many magazines, including The New Yorker, Harper's, Audubon, Smithsonian, and The New Republic. He teaches creative writing at Harvard University.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Wild Moments 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One needn't travel to distant worlds to encounter the exotic and astounding. One need only have eyes to see what has been before us all along. Williams is the lens through which we glimse wonders and exquisite beauty still abounding in the often cruelly damaged wild world in which we live. In these brief essays, collected from his Earth Alamnac column in Audubon Magazine, he reveals secrets of the commonplace--creatures and plants we may have glanced at many times without really seeing. The entries are like prose poems in crystalized language which make one stop again and again and say, ah . . . From the sublime: 'sweet pepper bush fills the air with a fragrance that freezes the fleeting hours of August, drugs the droning bee, and transports aging wanderers of the woods to a time when summer never ended and one's only commitments were to fish, frogs, and turtles . . .' to the ridiculous: 'tufts of silk protrude from the sun-split pods (of milkweed) like stuffing from puppy ripped pillows. . .' And don't forget the magic: 'Since this theory (that circular growths of fungus are set by dancing fairy feet) cannot be disproved, why hasten its extinction when you are afield with young companions?' If you know an environmentalist, give her this book. It will cheer her darkest hours and energize her crusade. If you know someone who is not an environmentalist, give her this book. It will convert her as surely as a full-immersion baptism. And keep your own copy to read and re-read . . .