Windflower

Windflower

by Nick Bantock, Edoardo Ponti

Hardcover

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Overview

With the same romance and drama that put his Griffin & Sabine saga on the New York Times best-seller list for over 100 weeks, selling three million copies in 12 international editions, Nick Bantock presents an unforgettable story of one woman's journey to self-discovery. Ana, a striking young dancer, is promised in marriage to a man she doesn't love. No one understands her reluctance to wed. After all, isn't Marco a fine man? Won't the union of their two families benefit her people? And yet Guided by her heart and forces she does not yet recognize, she flees to the exotic port of Serona in search of Felix Bulerias, a man reputed to have the answers she seeks. But along the way, the attentions of four unusual men threaten to lure Ana in directions that she could never have fathomedand lead her down a path of sensuality and understanding beyond any she could ever have imagined. Bantock's compelling narrative is accompanied by over 200 masterful color collages that form a frieze throughout. Brimming with myth and intrigue, Windflower is sure to enchant Nick Bantock fans the world over.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780811843522
Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date: 09/21/2006
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 7.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 13 - 18 Years

About the Author

Nick Bantock is the author of the non-fiction works The Artful Dodger and Urgent: Second Class as well as, among other books, his famed Griffin & Sabine saga. Born in England, Nick Bantock now makes his home in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Edoardo Ponti, the son of Carlo Ponti and Sophia Loren, is a screenwriter and film director of, most recently, Between Strangers.

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Windflower 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
rmckeown on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nick Bantock has a mysterious originality in his work. His series beginning with Griffin and Sabine, allowed the reader to peek into the private correspondence of a designer of stamps who lives in the South Pacific and an artist who lives in New York. By ¿peek,¿ I mean that literally ¿ some pages have envelopes pasted to the page, and the reader must lift the flap, remove the sheet and read the letter. Fascinating, thrilling, mysterious, and completely absorbing.In Windflower, he has written a more conventional tale about Ana, a young woman forced into marriage for economic reasons by her parents. As the ceremony is about to reach its conclusion, a violent wind sweeps in, and Ana takes the opportunity to run away. Her grandfather has told Ana her destiny lies in another direction.This adult fantasy has the feel of something placed in the middle ages, but a few times we are reminded it is firmly in the present, or at least the near past. Ana suddenly has a ¿torch¿ or flashlight, and she sees then flies in an airplane. His characters are as interesting and mysterious as the story itself.Along with the wonderful mesmerizing prose, Bantock¿s illustrations have a warmth and beauty all their own. His illustrations alone make his books collectible.Except for some instances hokey, clichéd dialogue, an almost perfect piece of literature. 4-1/2 stars.--Jim, 11/22/09
LynnB on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is beautiful. It is illustrated by the author, with wonderful glossy, thick pages. It reminds me why it is so special to hold a book. Reading words on a screen will never compare.The story is as sensuous as the book's physical characteristics. At first, it seemed like little more than a drug-store romance novel, albeit a exquisite one. But as the story evolves, the real power of Ana and the other characters is revealed. Lovely, in every sense.
Osbaldistone on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Well, this is a beautifully written and beautifully produced work (Chronicle Books, 2006, ISBN 0811843521). A lovely story, nicely presented. I did enjoy it, but it seems to be striving for deep spiritual meaning but doesn't seem to deliver. Perhaps I'm not getting it, or perhaps I'm misreading the purpose. Besides, I found the 'clues' to be far too obvious early on, spoiling the surprise in the denouement. I guess I'd say if 'feels' deeper than it really is.So, from my experience, I'd say just enjoy a beautiful, warm, well written story and don't search for some deep inner truth as you read. In this manner, both the story and the presentation (with Bantock's mysterious but often unrelated illustrations/decorations on every page) are a delight.Os.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago