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Windows PowerShell Unleashed
     

Windows PowerShell Unleashed

5.0 2
by Tyson Kopczynski, Pete Handley, Marco Shaw
 

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PowerShell gives Windows administrators immense power to automate and customize virtually any administrative task–saving time, increasing productivity, and giving you unprecedented flexibility. PowerShell 2.0 adds important new features that offer even greater control over Windows environments. Windows PowerShell Unleashed will not only give you deep

Overview

PowerShell gives Windows administrators immense power to automate and customize virtually any administrative task–saving time, increasing productivity, and giving you unprecedented flexibility. PowerShell 2.0 adds important new features that offer even greater control over Windows environments. Windows PowerShell Unleashed will not only give you deep mastery over PowerShell but also a greater understanding of the features being introduced in PowerShell 2.0–and show you how to use it to solve your challenges in your production environment.

The authors begin by systematically illuminating PowerShell’s core concepts and techniques, helping you leverage whatever Windows scripting experience you may already have. Next, using complete, easy-to-adapt examples, they show how to use PowerShell to manage file systems, permissions, the Registry, WMI objects, Active Directory, Exchange Server, and many other elements of the Windows environment.

More than half of this edition’s material and examples have been completely rewritten for PowerShell 2.0, and the authors have added seven entirely new chapters–covering security, PowerShell application development, Systems Center Operations Manager 2007, and much more. Whatever Windows systems you manage, Windows PowerShell Unleashed contains the scripts and techniques you need to manage them far more effectively.

  • Install, configure, and customize PowerShell 2.0 and master its command line interface
  • Discover proven best practices for PowerShell scripting
  • Make the most of PowerShell cmdlets–especially the new cmdlets included in PowerShell 2.0
  • Leverage PowerShell’s deep .NET Framework integration
  • Secure your scripts using code signing, execution policies, and PowerShell’s built-in security
  • Use custom script functions to manage permissions more efficiently
  • Control the registry locally and remotely and use PowerShell’s powerful new registry transactions
  • Use PowerShell as a management interface
  • Automate Exchange Server 2007 administrative tasks
  • Automate the management of Microsoft’s new System Center Operations Manager 2007
  • Preview the forthcoming Graphical PowerShell scripting environment
  • Understand how to manage Active Directory using PowerShell
  • Master using PowerShell with WMI
  • Learn PowerShell 2.0 remoting

Download all examples and source code presented in this book from informit.com/title/9780672329883.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672329883
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
12/19/2008
Series:
Unleashed Series
Edition description:
Second
Pages:
510
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

Well, we are back for yet another PowerShell Unleashed book. However, unlike just a simple revision of the existing book, which most likely would have resulted in only just a few updated chapters, I decided to instead treat this release in the series as almost a completely new book. Granted, the Community Technology Release (CTP) of PowerShell 2.0 did help drive the need to update all aspects of this edition. Nonetheless, there was also a lot of feedback (some positive and some negative) about how the first book could be improved.

So, based on this feedback and the looming PowerShell 2.0 feature list, I set about making a major revision to the book. To start off right, I decided to address how the PowerShell language was covered in the series. After all, the first book in the series was script heavy, but lacking when it came to explaining some of the basics about the PowerShell language. Additionally, we wanted to go into greater detail about how PowerShell could be used to manage Windows resources while further addressing some of the finer technical details of PowerShell’s architecture. Needless to say, all of these changes required a reorganization to not only the layout of the book, but also its size.

The bottom line, in this new edition, there are six completely new chapters with the rest of the existing chapters either being extensively rewritten or updated. With all this extra content, the book needed additional authors to jump on board and help pound out the book’s technical prose. Thus, joining me on this book as coauthors were Marco Shaw (PowerShell MVP) and Peter Handley (contributing author from the first book). Together, Marco and Peter made great additions to this book and infused fantastic ideas together with even better content—all while writing their chapters.

Finally, the primary goal of this book was to start down the path of explaining the features found in the future 2.0 release of PowerShell. After all, with the 2.0 CTP release late last year, the PowerShell product team ignited our imaginations with the possibilities for what might come down the road (remoting). So, we simply had to do our best to explain the new features. However, given that the 2.0 version is still just a CTP and not a beta, we also walked down a slippery slope, considering that some of these features may not exist in the PowerShell 2.0 RTM. Naturally, like a good reporter might do, we did our best. In the end, we tried to include 2.0 content where applicable while also dedicating an entire chapter to only 2.0 features deemed too important to ignore or voted most likely to survive the beta.

We hope our efforts result in a more comprehensive PowerShell book that can act as both a reference for the current PowerShell 1.0 release while also providing insight into where PowerShell might go with the 2.0 release.

Who Is This Book’s Intended Audience?

This Unleashed book is intended for an intermediate level of systems administrators who have invested time and energy learning Windows scripting and want to translate those skills into PowerShell skills while learning how it can meet their real-world needs. This book has been written so that anyone with a scripting background can understand what PowerShell is and how to use it, but by no means is it meant to be a complete PowerShell reference. Instead, think of it as a resource for learning how PowerShell can be applied in your own environment. Therefore, the structure of this book reflects that focus by including numerous command examples and working scripts.

How This Book Is Organized

The book is divided into the following three parts:


  • Part I, “Introduction to PowerShell”—In this section, you are introduced to PowerShell and some of its internal workings. Topics covered include items such as why PowerShell came into existence, general concepts about PowerShell and how it is constructed, and an in-depth review of PowerShell security.
  • Part II, “Using PowerShell”—In this section, you learn more about the PowerShell scripting language, how to use PowerShell to manage Windows resources, and important best practices to follow when using PowerShell. Specific topics covered range from working with the Windows file system, the Registry, permissions, strings, and Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) to understanding PowerShell language concepts such as loops, functions, arrays, and so on.
  • Part III, “Managing Microsoft Technologies with PowerShell”—In this section, you learn how PowerShell can be used to manage Microsoft technologies. Topics covered include using PowerShell to manage Active Directory, Exchange Server 2007, and Systems Center Operations Manager 2007. Additionally, you learn how to programmatically use PowerShell to manage systems and gain insight and understanding into important PowerShell 2.0 features.
    Conventions Used in This Book

    Commands, scripts, and anything related to code are presented in a special monospace computer typeface. Bold indicates key terms being defined, and italic is used to indicate variables or for emphasis. Great care has been taken to be consistent in letter case, naming, and structure, with the goal of making command and script examples more readable. In addition, you might find instances in which commands or scripts haven’t been fully optimized. This lack of optimization is for your benefit, as it makes those code samples more intelligible and follows the practice of writing code for others to read.

    Other standards used throughout this book are as follows:

    Black Code Boxes

    These code boxes contain commands that run in a PowerShell or Bash shell session.

    Gray Code Boxes

    These code boxes contain source code from scripts, configuration files, or other items that aren’t run directly in a shell session.

    Please note that although PowerShell can display text in multiple colors, all script output from the examples is printed here in black and white. If you run one of the example scripts on your lab system, the text will be displayed in color.

    CAUTION - Cautions alert you to actions that should be avoided.

    NOTE - Notes give you additional background information about a topic being discussed.

    © Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.


  • Meet the Author

    With more than nine years of experience in the information technology sector, Tyson Kopczynski has become a specialist in Active Directory, Group Policy, Windows scripting, Windows Rights Management Services, PKI, and information technology security practices. Tyson has been a contributing author for such books as Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2004 Unleashed and Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Unleashed (R2 Edition). In addition, he has written detailed technical papers and guides covering various in-the-field technologies he works with extensively. As a consultant at Convergent Computing (CCO), Tyson has been able to work with the next generation of Microsoft technologies since their inception and played a key role in expanding scripting and development practices at CCO. Tyson also holds the SANS Security Essentials Certification (GSEC), Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) Security certification, CompTIA Security+ certification, and SANS Certified Incident Handler (GCIH) certification.

    Pete Handley has more than 15 years of experience in IT, including extensive knowledge of Active Directory, Microsoft Exchange, Novell GroupWise messaging, and Novell Directory Services. He has been a contributing author for Microsoft Exchange 2003 Unleashed, and Windows PowerShell Unleashed. Pete specializes in Visual Basic and PowerShell scripting and is a subject matter expert on the integration and migration of Novell technologies to Microsoft technologies. Pete holds the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer 2003 (MCSE) certification, the Microsoft Certified Information Technology Professional (MCITP) certification, the Novell Certified Directory Engineer (CDE) certification, and the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification.

    Marco Shaw is an IT system analyst for a Canadian telecommunications company. He has been working in the IT industry for more than ten years, and he recently received a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) award for his involvement in the Windows PowerShell community. He is the assistant community director of the new PowerShell Community Web site at http://www.powershellcommunity.org. His primary blog site is http://marcoshaw.blogspot.com. Marco holds a RedHat Certified Engineer (RHCE) certification, Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) certification, and a bachelor of science degree from the Université de Moncton in New Brunswick, Canada.

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    Windows PowerShell Unleashed 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    While this came out during the PowerShell 2.0 Beta, it is still a comprehensive look at the power behind the 2.0 shell script. I would highly recommend purchasing this if you have any desire to learn more about the finer points in shell scripting.
    INDEPENDENTREVIEWER More than 1 year ago
    How can PowerShell be applied in your own environment? If you want to know, then this book is for you! Authors Tyson Kopczynski, Pete Handley, and Marco Shaw, have done an outstanding job of writing a book that is intended for intermediate level system administrators who have invested time and energy learning Windows scripting and want to translate those skills into PowerShell skills while learning how it can meet their real-world needs.


    Authors Kopczynski, Handley and Shaw, begin with an introduction to PowerShell and some of its internal workings. Then, the authors show you how to use the PowerShell scripting language; how to use PowerShell to manage Windows resources; and, important best practices to follow when using PowerShell. Finally, they also show you how PowerShell can be used to manage Microsoft technologies.


    This most excellent book has been written so that anyone with a scripting background can understand what PowerShell is and how to use it. Perhaps more importantly, think of this great book as a resource for learning how PowerShell can be applied in your own environment.