ISBN-10:
3030004368
ISBN-13:
9783030004361
Pub. Date:
06/27/2019
Publisher:
Springer International Publishing
Wine Tourism Destination Management and Marketing: Theory and Cases

Wine Tourism Destination Management and Marketing: Theory and Cases

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Overview

The book provides a holistic approach to wine destination management and marketing by bringing together wine tourism research with research in wine and destination management. Chapters are contributed by numerous international authors offering an international and multidisciplinary perspective. The book combines fresh research approaches with international industry examples and case studies in the following key topics: understanding demand of wine destinations; New approaches and practices of wine destination marketing; innovation and design of wine destination experiences and wine routes; planning and development of wine destinations. The book analyses wine destination management and marketing issues from the perspectives of the various stakeholders of wine destinations (e.g. tourists, cellar doors, wine tourism firms, destination managers, wine associations and networks). The book is equally valuable to researchers and industry professionals alike.


Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783030004361
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Publication date: 06/27/2019
Edition description: 1st ed. 2019
Pages: 621
Product dimensions: 5.83(w) x 8.27(h) x (d)

About the Author

Marianna Sigala is Professor of Tourism at the University of South Australia, Australia.


Richard N.S. Robinson is Research Development Fellow at the University of Queensland Business School, Australia.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Wine destination management and marketing: critical success factors

PART 1 WINE TOURISTS: Who are they and what do they want from wine destinations?


Introduction to Part 1: Richard N.S. Robinson



2 Understanding the wine tourist markets’ motivations, travel constraints, and perceptions of destination attributes: a case study of winery visitors in Sardinia, Italy


Aise KyoungJin Kim, University of South Australia, Australia


Giacomo Del Chiappa, University of Sassari, Italy


Ester Napolitano, University of Cagliari, Italy



3. Wine tourist’s perception of winescape in Central Otago, New Zealand


Joanna Fountain, Lincoln University, New Zealand


Charlotte Thompson, Lincoln University, New Zealand

The image of a wine tourist and impact on self-image congruity


Marlene Pratt, Griffith University, Australia



5. Seeking the typical characteristics of wine tourists in South Greece


Panagiotis Tataridis, Pan-Hellenic Union of Registered Oenologists (PANEPO) Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Greece


Kanellakopoulos Christos, Pan-Hellenic Union of Registered Oenologists (PANEPO)



Kanellis Anastasios, Pan-Hellenic Union of Registered Oenologists (PANEPO)


Gatselos Lazaros, Pan-Hellenic Union of Registered Oenologists (PANEPO)



6. Motivations of wine travellers in rural Northeast Iowa


Oksana Grybovych Hafermann, University of Northern Iowa,


Samuel V Lankford, California State University,



PART 2 WINE DESTINATION MARKETING: New Approaches and Practices


Introduction to Part 2: Marianna Sigala & Richard N.S. Robinson



7. E- Storytelling and wine tourism branding: insights from the “Wine roads of Northern Greece”


Christina Bonarou, Hellenic Open University, Greece
Paris Tsartas, Harokopio University of Athens, Greece


Efthymia Sarantakou, Hellenic Open University, Greece



8. Building a wine tourism destination through coopetition: the business model of Ultimate Winery Experiences Australia


Marianna Sigala, University of South Australia, Australia




9. Developing and branding a wine destination through UNESCO World Heritage listing: the case of the Mount Lofty Ranges Agrarian Landscape


Marianna Sigala, University of South Australia, Australia



10. Effects of the World Heritage Label in Champagne Region


Fabrice Thuriot, University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France



PART 3 DESIGNING EXPERIENCES: Developing and innovating wine destinations


Introduction to Part 3: Marianna Sigala



11. Wine and Food Events: experiences and impacts


Donald Getz, The University of Calgary, Canada



12. Pouring new wines into old wineskins? Sub-regional identity and the case of the Basket Range Festival


Jonathan Staggs, University of Queensland, Australia


Matt Brenner, University of Queensland, Australia




13. Wine Tourism: balancing core product and service dominant strategies


Bonnie Canziani, University of North Carolina Greensboro



14. Wine Tourism Experiences and Marketing: the case of the Douro Valley in Portugal


Alexandra I. Correia, Polytechnic of Viana do Castelo, Portugal


Raquel Cunha, Polytechnic of Viana do Castelo, Portugal


Olga Matos, Polytechnic of Viana do Castelo, Portugal


Carlos Fernandes, Polytechnic of Viana do Castelo, Portugal



15. Managing and marketing wine destinations with and through art: a framework for designing wine experiences


Marianna Sigala, University of South Australia, Australia



16. Developing a destination within a destination: The d’Arenberg Cube, the iconic monument of experiences that synergise wine, tourism and art


Marianna Sigala, University of South Australia, Australia


Ruth Rentschler, University of South Australia, Australia


Georgian wine museum is making a strategic decision


Natalia Velikova, Texas Tech University, USA


Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva, KEDGE Business School



18. How to Design a Wine Museum: Insights from La Cité du Vin in Bordeaux


Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva KEDGE Business School, France


Frédéric Ponsignon, KEDGE Business School, France


François Durrieu, KEDGE Business School, France


Jacques-Olivier Pesme, KEDGE Business School, France



19. “OINOXENEIA”: A wine tourism event in Aigialeia, Peloponnese


Athanasia Charitonidou, Cultural Εvents Programme Coordinator, Municipal Welfare Business of Aigialeia.


Maria Tsoukala, President, Municipal Welfare Business of Aigialeia


Sotirios Bolis, Consultant, Project manager, Municipal Welfare Business of Aigialeia



PART 4 DESIGNING AND MANAGING WINE ROUTES: packaging and partnerships


Introduction to Part 4: Richard N.S. Robinson



20. Life cycle of wine routes: North Portugal’s perspective


Darko Dimitrovski, University of Kragujevac, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), Portugal


Susana Rachão, INNOVINE & WINE project at UTAD, Portugal


Veronika Joukes, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), Portugal



21. Wine routes and tourism potential in Turkey


Sibel Oncel, Anadolu University, Turkey


Medet Yolal, Anadolu University, Turkey



22. Wine trails in the Czech Republic


Martin PROKEŠ, Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic



23. Supporting tourists’ mobility in wine destinations: the hop-on hop-off bus in Swan Valley, Western Australia



Marianna Sigala, University of South Australia, Australia



24. Seeking Differentiation: Queensland Australia’s ‘Strangebird Wine Trail’.


Richard Robinson, The University of Queensland



PART 5 DESTINATION PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT: Collaboration and horizons


Introduction to Part 5: Marianna Sigala



25. Wine Industry and Wine Tourism Industry Collaboration: A Typology and Analysis


McGregor, Arwen, Queensland Wine Industry Association


Robinson, R.N.S., The University of Queensland



26. Wine plus Tourism Offers: It is not all about wine. Wine Tourism in Germany.


Axel Dreyer, University of Applied Sciences, Germany


The future of wine tourism in the Okanagan Valley: a Delphi method survey


Michael Conlin, Okanagan College, Canada


Alan Rice, Okanagan College, Canada



28. Wine Tourism in South Africa: Valued Attributes and Their Role as Memorable Enticements


Robert J. Harrington, Washington State University, USA


Michael C. Ottenbacher, Kansas State University, USA


Byron Marlowe, Washington State University, USA


Ulrike Siguda, Heilbronn University, Germany



29. Wine tourism destinations across the Life-Cycle: A qualitative comparison of Northern Greece, Peloponnese and Crete


Maria Alebaki, Agricultural Economics Research Institute (AGRERI), Hellenic Agricultural Organization DIMITRA, Athens, Greece


Alex Koutsouris, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece



Wine tourism in an emerging destination: the Côte Chalonnaise, Burgundy


Joanna Fountain, Lincoln University, New Zealand


Laurence Cogan-Marie, Burgundy School of Business, France



Importance of Tasting Room Activities and Staff Training in Emerging Wine Regions: the Case of Northern Virginia


Jennifer L. Blanck, Burgundy School of Business, France


Laurence Cogan-Marie, Burgundy School of Business, France


Lara Agnoli, Burgundy School of Business, France



Wine Tourism and Regional Economic Development: Of Mimesis and Business Models


Donna Sears, Acadia University, Canada


Terrance G. Weatherbee, Acadia University, Canada




Positioning the Current Development of China’s Wine Tourism Destinations: A Netnography Approach


Bob Duan, Griffith University, Australia


Charles Arcodia, Griffith University, Australia



Emily Ma, University of Massachusetts, USA



The role of networks, synergies and collective action in the development of wine tourism: The case of ‘Wines of Crete’


Anna Kyriakaki, University of the Aegean, Greece


Nikolaos Trihas, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Greece


Efthymia Sarantakou, Hellenic Open University, Greece



Economic impacts of a developing wine tourism industry in Iowa


Oksana Grybovych Hafermann, University of Northern Iowa, USA


Samuel V Lankford, California State University, USA




A vehicle for destination development? The case of the Wolfville Magic Winery Bus

Donna Sears, Acadia University, Canada


Terrance G. Weatherbee, Acadia University, Canada



Metsovo as a wine tourism destination


Maria Dimou, Katogi Averoff S.A., Greece



Epilogue


An ecosystems framework for studying wine tourism: actors, co-creation processes, experiences and outcomes


Richard N.S. Robinson


Marianna Sigala

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