Winesburg, Ohio

Winesburg, Ohio

by Sherwood Anderson
3.7 52

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Winesburg Ohio 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 52 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although it begins slowly and eerily, it does eventually unfold. The stories are connected in an interesting way, and it is up to you to see it either as one big story or a bunch of little ones. It was easy to relate to most of the stories in some way, and this made for a relaxing read. I recommend this to those who have ever lived in a small town.
Daven Carlson More than 1 year ago
Anderson very creatively intertwined the characters of his fictional town. It's as if we're in a 360 degree setting. It is also intriguing how relatively open about human sexuality Anderson is, given the early 1900s time period in which it was written.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I wish I had read the book first...the audio version failed to move me. The readers, famous as they may be for their own work, are NOT performers..they were not able to bring the stories alive..they seem pretty uninterested and really untalented. Wonder how much they were paid for their individual 'performances'? Oh well... Might I suggest a REALLY good audio book? Pepys' Diary, read by Shakespearean actor Kenneth Branagh...a great example of how an audio book should be done.
Laura_at_125Pages More than 1 year ago
Original Review @ 125Pages.com Winesburg, Ohio is a series of interconnecting short stories (twenty-two in total) published in 1919. It is considered to be one of the earliest works of modernist literature and in 1998, the Modern Library rankedWinesburg, Ohio 24th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. Focusing mainly on George Willard, a young man coming of age in the early 1900’s in a small town, all the stories revolve around the citizens in the town. Stories range from tales of the local doctor, school teacher and merchant. Tales of scandal, the women who was the first to have a driver for her carriage, family, the mother who is uninterested in raising her child, and love, a brief affair concerning the town doctor, showcase the citizens of the town. Over one hundred characters are mentioned, some only once and some weave through each story. It was interesting to see that gossip about others was prevalent in that time and that jealousy regarding monetary and social statuses were also heavily in play. There were very obvious social classes and the interaction between the haves and the have nots was a primary focus. This was a very fast read at only 180-ish pages and I did enjoy it. The pacing was quick, as each story was only a few pages long. The world building was superb. Sherwood Anderson created such a complete and well fleshed out world, I could picture the streets, the stores and the houses as I read. The characters fit well in the world and even though you only got glimpses into their world, I understood their motivations and actions. While Winesburg, Ohio is not a typical read for me now, I was a classic English lit major when I started college and have read a large amount of classics in the past. It was nice to get back to my reading roots and delve into a story (in this case stories) that don’t focus on social media mishaps, love found across a bar, or a helicopter parent. Not that I don’t enjoy reads like that, but sometimes focusing on the writing itself is a welcome change. Favorite lines – In all the babble of words that fell from the lips of the men with whom she adventured she was trying to find what would be for her the true word. Little pyramids of truth he erected and after erecting knocked them down again that he might have the truths to erect other pyramids.
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Lucy-from-PA More than 1 year ago
This is a very negative "story" if that's what it could or would be called. I didn't want to finish it but I thought just maybe there would be a ray of light at the end of the horrendous tunnel. NO They style of writing was ok, northing to write home about. The story was horrible.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hola
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BuckeyeGN More than 1 year ago
I decided to read this because it sounded interesting and I had seen it on a couple must-read lists. I ended up taking about twice as long to read it as it should because I found it so horribly boring that I couldn't get myself to actually pick it up to finish it. If you are looking for an enjoyable way to pass time, I would suggest watching paint dry, watching grass grow or just counting how many people on the street have their shirts tucked in over reading this book. The stories are bland and pointless.
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The only objection I have is that is doesn't have the different sections identified in the "context"
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Bookworm705 More than 1 year ago
This book was nothing at all what I had imagined. I haven't read it all as yet, but so far, it has been somewhat interesting as a collection of very short tales of various small town people and their ideosyncrasies. The writing style is nothing like any other I have noticed before, although one might see certain resemblances in the writings of Chekhov and Katherine Mansfield. I can't say that I can relate to most of the characters or to the situations portrayed, which might be why the tales seem interesting.
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