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With Her in Ourland
     

With Her in Ourland

by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
 

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all-women utopia in a secluded high valley, where 3 adventurous young men visit by airplane....

"I'm beginning to understand," she told me sweetly, "that I mustn't judge this—miscellaneous—world of yours as I do my country. We were just ourselves—an isolated homogeneous people. When we moved, we all moved together. You are all kinds of people, in all kinds

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all-women utopia in a secluded high valley, where 3 adventurous young men visit by airplane....

"I'm beginning to understand," she told me sweetly, "that I mustn't judge this—miscellaneous—world of yours as I do my country. We were just ourselves—an isolated homogeneous people. When we moved, we all moved together. You are all kinds of people, in all kinds of places, touching at the edges and getting mixed. And so far from moving on together, there are no two nations exactly abreast—that I can see; and they mostly are ages apart; some away ahead of the others, some going far faster than others, some stationary."
"Yes," I told her, "and in the still numerous savages we find the beginners, and the back-sliders—the hopeless back-sliders, in human progress."
"I see—I see—" she said reflectively. "When you say 'the civilized world' that is just a figure of speech. The world is not civilized yet—only spots in it, and those not wholly."
"That's about it," I agreed with her. "Of course, the civilized nations think of themselves as the world—that's natural."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940148949688
Publisher:
Hillside Publishing
Publication date:
01/13/2015
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
174 KB

Meet the Author

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (July 3, 1860 – August 17, 1935) was a prominent American sociologist, novelist, writer of short stories, poetry, and non fiction, and a lecturer for social reform. She was a utopian feminist during a time when her accomplishments were exceptional for women, and she served as a role model for future generations of feminists because of her unorthodox concepts and lifestyle. Her best remembered work today is her semi-autobiographical short story, "The Yellow Wallpaper", which she wrote after a severe bout of post-partum depression. Source:Wikipedia.
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