With Music and Justice for All: Some Southerners and Their Passions

With Music and Justice for All: Some Southerners and Their Passions

by Frye Gaillard

Hardcover

$71.96 $79.95 Save 10% Current price is $71.96, Original price is $79.95. You Save 10%.
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Monday, February 24
MARKETPLACE
9 New & Used Starting at $8.47

Overview


For nearly forty years, Frye Gaillard has covered the American South as a journalist, historian and writer of memoir. With Music and Justice for All is a collection of Gaillard's most compelling work, one writer's odyssey though a time and place. There are stories here of the civil rights movement, a moral, social and political upheaval that changed the South in so many ways. Gaillard has captured the essence of that drama by giving it a face--telling the stories of the ordinary people, as well as the icons. In the course of these pages, the reader not only meets Dr. Martin Luther King, but also the lesser known heroes such Perry Wallace--the first African American basketball player in the Southeastern Conference and Thomas Gilmore, the first black sheriff in one of the toughest counties in the Alabama Black Belt, a man of non-violence, who refused, in deference to the fallen Dr. King, to carry a gun during the thirteen years he served as sheriff.


But Gaillard examines the South from other angles as well--the religious heritage, for example, that once led Flannery O'Connor to write about a "Christ-haunted" South. We meet Billy Graham, the greatest evangelist of his time, who admitted in the course of interviews with Gaillard that his ministry represented a "very narrow gift." There are profiles here of the Southern Baptist renegade Will Campbell and former President Jimmy Carter, whose commitment to his own understanding of Christianity has sometimes led him into controversy. Gaillard writes also about the revealing power of Southern music--how the great Johnny Cash, for example, became a force for reconciliation in America. In the final section of the book we meet some of the characters Gaillard has covered through the years, including John T. Scopes, whose final public appearance Gaillard wrote about as a young reporter in Nashville.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780826515889
Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press
Publication date: 03/24/2008
Pages: 240
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

About the Author


Frye Gaillard, writer-in-residence at the University of South Alabama, is the author of seventeen other works of non-fiction, including Prophet from Plains: Jimmy Carter and His Legacy; The Dream Long Deferred: The Landmark Struggle for Desegregation in Charlotte, North Carolina; Cradle of Freedom: Alabama and the Movement That Changed America; and Watermelon Wine: The Spirit of Country Music.

Table of Contents


Part I A Change is Gonna Come
1 Deliverance: The Greensboro Four
[FRANKLIN MCCAIN, JOE MCNEILL, JIBREEL KHAZAN]
2 The Power and the Glory of a Tuna Fish Sandwich
[CHARLES JONES]
3 Perry Wallace: The Long Road Home
[PERRY WALLACE]
4 The Sheriff Without a Gun
[THOMAS GILMORE]
5 RFK: A Night at Vanderbilt
[ROBERT KENNEDY]
6 Free at Last, Free at Last
[LEWIS BALDWIN]

Part II Amazing Grace
7 The Gospel According to Will
[WILL CAMPBELL]
8 The Double-Edged Legacy of Billy Graham
[BILLY GRAHAM]
9 Charlotte's Holy Wars: Religion in a New South City

10 The Lonely Crusade of Karen Graham
[KAREN GRAHAM]
11 Koinonia: The Birth of Habitat for Humanity
[MILLARD FULLER]
12 The Lion's Den and Jimmy Carter
[JIMMY CARTER]

Part III Soundtracks
13 The Man in Black
[JOHNNY CASH]
14 Southern Rock: The New Good Ole Boys
[CHARLIE DANIELS]
15 Old-Fashioned Notions of Love and Music
[SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS]
16/17 Country Queens: Cowgirl's Prayer & Sweeter with the Years
[EMMYLOU HARRIS, MARSHALL CHAPMAN]
18 With Music and Justice for All
[SI KAHN]

Part IV Characters
19 A Visit with John T. Scopes
[JOHN T. SCOPES]
20 James Baldwin's First Journey South
[JAMES BALDWIN]
21 The Many Crusades of Tipper Gore
[TIPPER GORE]
22 The Education of Robert Howard Allen
[ROBERT HOWARD ALLEN]
23 Pride and Prejudice
[DR. C. ERIC LINCOLN]
24 The Last Confession
[PALMER GAILLARD, ROBERT CROSHON]

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

With Music and Justice for All: Some Southerners and Their Passions 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
crazy4reading on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
With Music and Justice for All is the first book I have read about the South. I found myself intrigued by the Southern History and Culture with this book.I was educated on events that I thought I knew about and some that I knew nothing about. The book, With Music and Justice for All, covers many aspects and people from the South. Some are names you recognize and think you know a lot about them. Others are lesser known yet they contributed in some way to the history and culture of the south.My reading choices have now been expanded by reading With Music and Justice for All.
thornton37814 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a collection of essays by the author who is serving as writer-in-residence at the University of South Alabama according to the book's dust jacket. The author has given us a very readable collection of essays on many Southern subjects. The book is divided into four sections. The first section deals with the Civil Rights era. This is probably my least favorite of all the sections, but I confess that I believe far too much is written on this era while other eras of Southern history (with the exception of the Civil War era) are largely ignored by historians. The second section focused on religion -- everything from Will Campbell to Billy Graham to Carlyle Marney to Operation Rescue and a few other topics thrown in as well. The third section's focus was music -- Johnny Cash, Southern Rockers (Marshall Tucker Band, Charlie Daniels Band, Allman Brothers), and others. I was disappointed that some of the religious music traditions were omitted because these have played an important part in Southern music. The final section was called "Characters" and consisted of essays on persons who didn't quite fit the other categories -- people like John T. Scopes of the famed "Monkey Trial" and Tipper Gore. Gaillard is a very capable writer. I doubt that the book will have a large audience, but those who do read it will likely enjoy it.
KWoman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Bringing the reader into the middle of the deep south, the author provides an inner workings of the traditions, troubles, religion,and music. The book grabs you from the beginning page to the last page throughout. This knowledge was not in our high school history books!!
richardderus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Essays are like bonsai: Small, manicured versions of things that could, possibly even should, be larger. The thing bonsai'd matters greatly, but only to the most superficial of observers; the bonsai itself is reward enough for the more disciplined, receptive viewer.I could, I suppose, review each essay with comments on its individual stylistic merits and demerits, but that sort of reader-response review makes me itch (sort of like Tipper Gore, a profilee herein, does) because it's so off the point (also like Mrs. Gore). What does this group of essays MEAN? Why do they exist between two covers in the first place? Does the author/editor achieve some of their goals in the collection?So...what does this collection mean. Well, now, it's all about the South (note capital) and Southerners (again). It's about what change meant and means to the people and places profiled. It's about cusps and edges, personal and societal, and so it's about moments of truth. Does it MEAN something more than that?Not that I can see.As to why the collection of essays exists between two covers in the first place, well...tricky to say...no new ground gets broken here, and the essays that have the highest probability of being new takes on a subject have already been turned into books by Gaillard himself (eg, "Deliverance: The Greensboro Four" became "The Greensboro Four", and "The Lion's Den and Jimmy Carter" is also "Prophet from Plains").So why? Hey, why not? It's good stuff in here.Does the author/editor achieve his goal in selecting the collection? Since we're not acquainted, I go with Gaillard's words: "In a sense, the book represents the evolution of one writer's career, but more than that it is intended to be a portrait of a place, or at least a collection of verbal snapshots." (Preface, p. ix) Well...how much of an evolutionary trend is likely to be in a collection wherein the pieces, per the author, are often "recast" into new forms? Is it a portrait of a place? Depends...Nashville, Charlotte, maybe, but the whole South? Ummm...don't really think that's an achieveable goal.And yet, and yet...there are two profiles in here that, in my never-very-humble opinion, should be widely read. The first is "The Education of Robert Howard Allen," a poet infuriatingly underknown, whose amazing, incandescent book "Simple Annals" belongs on your shelves whether you like poetry or not. It is simply staggering that a story like Allen's could BE in the 20th Century. A child of poverty whose formal education began at thirty-two, when he went off to college in 1978, Allen learned to read by studying comic books with an elderly relative. He progressed to reading his great aunt Ida, the matriarch of the house, the Bible. The local library, four miles away, was run by a remarkably astute and gifted librarian whose guidance was the rest of his education.When you read his poetry, you'll understand just how astonishing this is. Go on now, go to the book-buyin' website of your choice and order up "Simple Annals." I'll wait.There. You'll feel better when you've got the book and read some of its clean, burnished lines, which I can't stop myself from quoting one: "Because he whispered to her/The common secrets of an honest heart,/Death, because his finger/Traced words he could not write upon her cheek, death,/..." It's from "Elias Butler" and it's quoted in Gaillard's essay and it's just a small sample of this remarkable poet's beautiful work.The second essay I'd like everyone who reads this review to read is "The Gospel According to Will." It's about a contrary ol' cuss called Will Campbell, a Baptist preacher since he was 14, and you know something weird and wonderful is happening if I, a bitterly anti-Christian activist/former Catholic, am urging one and all to read this! I can't imagine a better endorsement for an essay than this: I came away filled with admiration for this plain-spoken, no-BS, truly good follower of a usually malignant creed. I know there are good Christian
ReaderRichard More than 1 year ago
Essays are like bonsai: Small, manicured versions of things that could, possibly even should, be larger. The thing bonsai'd matters greatly, but only to the most superficial of observers; the bonsai itself is reward enough for the more disciplined, receptive viewer. What does this group of essays MEAN? Why do they exist between two covers in the first place? Does the author/editor achieve some of their goals in the collection? So...what does this collection mean. Well, now, it's all about the South (note capital) and Southerners (again). It's about what change meant and means to the people and places profiled. It's about cusps and edges, personal and societal, and so it's about moments of truth. Does it MEAN something more than that? Not that I can see. As to why the collection of essays exists between two covers in the first place, well...tricky to say...no new ground gets broken here, and the essays that have the highest probability of being new takes on a subject have already been turned into books by Gaillard himself (eg, "Deliverance: The Greensboro Four" became "The Greensboro Four", and "The Lion's Den and Jimmy Carter" is also "Prophet from Plains"). So why? Hey, why not? It's good stuff in here. Does the author/editor achieve his goal in selecting the collection? Since we're not acquainted, I go with Gaillard's words: "In a sense, the book represents the evolution of one writer's career, but more than that it is intended to be a portrait of a place, or at least a collection of verbal snapshots." (Preface, p. ix) Well...how much of an evolutionary trend is likely to be in a collection wherein the pieces, per the author, are often "recast" into new forms? Is it a portrait of a place? Depends...Nashville, Charlotte, maybe, but the whole South? Ummm...don't really think that's an achieveable goal. And yet, and yet...there is a profile in here that, in my never-very-humble opinion, should be widely read. "The Education of Robert Howard Allen," a poet infuriatingly underknown, whose amazing, incandescent book "Simple Annals" belongs on your shelves whether you like poetry or not. It is simply staggering that a story like Allen's could BE in the 20th Century. A child of poverty whose formal education began at thirty-two, when he went off to college in 1978, Allen learned to read by studying comic books with an elderly relative. He progressed to reading his great aunt Ida, the matriarch of the house, the Bible. The local library, four miles away, was run by a remarkably astute and gifted librarian whose guidance was the rest of his education. When you read his poetry, you'll understand just how astonishing this is. Go on now, go to the book's page and order up "Simple Annals." I'll wait. The essays on music are, to me at least, the weakest ones, though I am a fan of most of his profilees. Emmylou Harris, Marshall Chapman, Si Kahn, Johnny Cash, Marshall Tucker...all excellent performers, but I don't know anything after reading these...appreciations, let's call them...that I didn't walk in knowing. Still, I can't help myself. This collection is very nicely written, and the heights are high. I recommend it.