Woman on the Edge of Time

Woman on the Edge of Time

by Marge Piercy
3.5 17

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Overview

Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

Connie Ramos, a woman in her mid-thirties, has been declared insane. But Connie is overwhelmingly sane, merely tuned to the future, and able to communicate with the year 2137. As her doctors persuade her to agree to an operation, Connie struggles to force herself to listen to the future and its lessons for today....

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780449232088
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/12/1981

About the Author

Marge Piercy has written seventeen novels including the New York Times bestseller Gone to Soldiers, the national bestsellers Braided Lives and The Longings of Women, and the classic Woman on the Edge of Time, as well as He, She and It and Sex Wars; nineteen volumes of poetry including The Hunger Moon: New and Selected Poems 1980–2010, The Crooked Inheritance, and Made in Detroit; and the critically acclaimed memoir Sleeping with Cats. Born in center city Detroit, educated at the University of Michigan and Northwestern, and the recipient of four honorary doctorates, Piercy is active in antiwar, feminist, and environmental causes.

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Woman on the Edge of Time 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Woman on the Edge of Time' is not meant to be science fiction so much as a comment on the nature of power in US society. Some of the negative reviews on this site seem to respond more to the politics of author Marge Piercy's criticism of late 20th century institutions of authority. In my opinion as a former mental health worker and lifelong social critic, and a reader of much of Piercy's work, this is among Piercy's most ambitious novels,and one of her strongest. It is bitingly political without resorting to polemics it is a highly readable and engaging story about despair, power, love, and violence of many types. The protagonist is a woman striped of legitimacy in society: a Mexican-American living in New York City who has been labeled as mentally ill. She has lost her much-loved daughter to the child protection system and her lover, the tender blind pickpocket, to the penal system in which he has died. And her version of the truth about the world in which she lives, where her niece is being abused by a pimp, is discounted by all - after all, she is a mental patient and a convicted 'child abuser.' Somehow, she is contacted by a utopian agrarian non-hierarchical society in the next century who treat her far better than anyone has or will treated her in her everyday life. These people are themselves in danger from invasion from a parallel-universe dystopian group. Their struggle to survive mirrors Connie's more personal battles,and she becomes a heroic figure while fighting for her own dignity in a system that is designed to strip her of exactly that. Woman on the Edge of Time is a moving tale with the ring of authenticity about psychiatric power and its devastating effects of the poor and marginalized, alongside its science-fiction elements. This book was written decades ago, and its environmental and human rights messages ring at least as true today. Highly recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is possibly the best book ever written in the context of future societies, utopia/distopia and warning the possibility of a bleak period for humanity. The truly frightening thing about this book is that the political/economic/military/social factors all seem to be coming into formation for a New Technological Dark Ages to occurr, with the military expansionism of the 'war on terrorism', the eroding of civil liberties with the USA PATRIOT ACT, the rise of the Christian Fascist movements of Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell and how these forces are a major pillar of backing and influence in the Bush Administration. What has not fully come into formation like the plot of Marge Piercey's book is the resistance to this new technological Dark Ages, that is urgently needed in order to end the oppression of women and help liberate humanity.
CJ1952 More than 1 year ago
I read this book about 25 years ago and loved it. Upon reading it again, I wondered why I loved it so much. I decided that back then I was discovering myself, and this is a book of discovery as well as mystery. It was written in the throws of the "women's movement" (but then again we are always in the throws of the "women's movement"), and that rings loud and clear. It's a harsh look at a world of sadness and pain that I admit, I am not familiar with. I suggested it for my book group, and for the few of us who read the entire book, we had a great discussion. It's difficult to read subject matter wise, but easy to read style wise. I'm a big sci-fi reader, so this doesn't totally fit the bill. It's futuristic which to me can be different from my normal sci-fi need. For me sci-fi is totally "The Matrix" or "Avatar" which of course are futuristic as well. I just like technology and aliens in my sci-fi. Am I glad I read it again? Sure...it's worth the read and I love Marge Piercy's intellect and knowledge. Read her poem "Barbie Doll"...it's my favorite...go figure.
Rhonda Barovsky More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite books of all time!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Loved it!! Woman on the Ege of Time has been my favorite book since I first read it in the mid-1980s. I re-read it at least once a year and always find something new to think about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was introduced to this book through a friend for Women's History Month - Women Writers. It is now my all time favorite book and I am giving gift copies of it to everyone I know for the Holidays - women and men alike.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don't let the first pages stop you, this is a great story with very interesting ideas in it about our society. The ideas about education and child care are surprising. Try it, you'll like it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Boring
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is not to say I wont read anymore Marge Piercy. I have read alot of her poems which are really good and so is her book So You Want to Write. As for Woman On the Edge of Time...some parts were really interesting but the more I read it the more boring it became. I could't get into the charactars from the future. I'm not sure if it is because of their names or the way they were described. I didn't even realize White Oak was a female until the end of the novel. I kept mixing her up with Bee and Jackrabbit. There way of life was interesting but some of it was just weird and too unrealisitc...like the way the babies had three mothers and the way they were born. The book was more interesting when Connie was in the hospital. And I really like Sybil's character. But the future scenes were too unrealistic. The book started off with a bang and then it dragged on and on. If I ever re-read this book it will be a long time from now. I wouldn't recommend this book unless your into futuristic novels but I do intend to read her other books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would have to say that although there were a few original ideas the characters were all extremely stereotypical and the behavior of people was rather unbelievable in the extreme. The science behind the time travel was also vague and unsatisfactory. This book panders to people who have already made up their mind that men are the cause of all evils on earth. If only life were really that simple. I prefer reading something that is a little more balanced and credible and interesting. In short if you are a man hater you will probably love this book. For everyone else I would suggest reading something more entertaining and realistic, like maybe the back of a cereal box. There are actually many extremely talented women science fiction authors out there so I believe it would be a disservice to women everywhere to praise a mediocre author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i liked it better the first time when it was written by kurt vonnegut, JR. and called Slaughter House Five